Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

The World’s Reaction To The Wuhan Coronavirus

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, March 5, 2020

Most preindustrial mass plagues were bacterial, caused by urban overcrowding and poor-to-nonexistent garbage and sewage disposal. In the disruptive aftermath of pandemics, fundamental social and political change sometimes followed—wars lost, governments ended, wealth and power reversed. 

Featured

Politically Allocated (Aka "Affordable") Housing

by John H. Cochranevia Grumpy Economist
Thursday, March 5, 2020

I've long been curious about politically allocated housing. (It's called "affordable," and "below market rate," but why should we let the left make up all the buzzwords?) A free market economist smells a rat of inefficient subsidies, and huge inequality-increasing implicit tax rates.

Featured

Bernie Took California, But All’s Not Golden In The Biggest Of Super Tuesday Prizes

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Friday, March 6, 2020

With distance comes perspective. And though it hasn’t been all that long since Californians went to the polls, here are some thoughts with regard to this week’s primary in the Golden State, one of 14 states to participate in this year’s “Super Tuesday” of voting, coast to coast.

Featured

Expect Sales To Increase In Areas Outside Travel And Leisure Amid Coronavirus Outbreak, Says John Taylor

interview with John B. Taylorvia CNBC
Friday, March 6, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow John Taylor discusses the effect of the coronavirus on markets and monetary policy.

decision 2020
Featured

Decision 2020 Report: How To Fix America’s Immigration System

Thursday, March 5, 2020
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The eighth edition of the Decision 2020 Report explores research and analysis from Hoover fellows about solutions to what many in politics and the media call a “broken” immigration system in America. Topics include the economics of combating illegal immigration; the value immigrants bring to American society; and the impact of Mexico’s economy on the flow of migrants.

News
Analysis and Commentary
The Classicist with Victor Davis Hanson:
Analysis and Commentary

The Classicist: Peak Progressivism

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia The Classicist
Friday, March 6, 2020

The Left has reached its apex — which means it’s headed for decline.

Analysis and Commentary

Pacific Century: The Coronavirus Spreads

interview with Michael R. Auslin, John Yoovia The Pacific Century
Friday, March 6, 2020

Is the coronavirus epidemic the black swan event for the Xi regime?

Analysis and Commentary

Stimulus Or Stimu-lend?

by John H. Cochranevia Grumpy Economist
Friday, March 6, 2020

Jason Furman wants stimulus: Congress should pass a simple one-time payment of $1,000 to every adult who is a U.S. citizen or a taxpaying U.S. resident, and $500 to every child who meets the same criteria. Here's a better idea. The IRS should allow anyone to borrow up to $10,000 against future tax payments, with interest. The IRS has an excellent collection mechanism.

Analysis and Commentary

Of Primary Concern: Improving This Presidential Process

by Bill Whalenvia Forbes
Thursday, March 5, 2020

This contest isn’t over. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders could stage a comeback (mostly likely, he needs former Vice President Joe Biden committing the mother of all gaffes at the next debate, which is on The Ides of March in Phoenix – two days before big votes in Florida and Ohio).

Analysis and Commentary

12 People And Things That Have Ruined India

by Tunku Varadarajanvia Politico
Thursday, March 5, 2020

Even before the riots, Narendra Modi’s India was a sectarian battleground.

Analysis and Commentary

A Missed Opportunity On Reindexing Social Security

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, March 6, 2020

The low point between the two men [President Obama and Senator Bernie Sanders] was a 2013 meeting with other Democratic senators. Obama had just put a chained Consumer Price Index in his budget, a proposal that would cut Social Security benefits by tying them to the rate of inflation. Many Senate Democrats were angry about it. 

Interviews
Interviews

Niall Ferguson: Stocks Tumble As Coronavirus Spreads In The US

interview with Niall Fergusonvia Fox News
Thursday, March 5, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Niall Ferguson discusses how the coronavirus might impact the economy.

Interviews

John Cochrane On The John Bachelor Show

interview with John H. Cochranevia The John Batchelor Show
Thursday, March 5, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow John Cochrane discusses his Grumpy Economist post "Coronavirus monetary policy."

Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson On The John Bachelor Show

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia The John Batchelor Show
Thursday, March 5, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses his National Review article "Globalization Bleeding."

Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia The John Batchelor Show
Thursday, March 5, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses his National Review article "Trump’s Chances for Reelection Are Looking Better and Better."

Interviews

Michael Petrilli: A College Education Affects Income More In Idaho Than In Other States

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Boise State Public Radio
Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli discusses a new study which shows that people with bachelor’s degrees earn more per year on average than those with only a high school diploma. The gap widens around Boise, where people with a bachelor’s degree earn almost $38,000 more per year. 

Interviews

Michael Petrilli On The Education Gadfly Show: Heavens To Betsy's Block Grant

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Education Gadfly
Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli talks about the Trump administration’s proposal to block-grant the federal Charter Schools Program.

In the News
In the News

Is This How To Educate An American?

featuring Chester E. Finn Jr., Michael J. Petrillivia Psychology Today
Thursday, March 5, 2020

A new volume edited by Michael Petrilli and Chester Finn titled How to Educate an American brings together numerous thought leaders around social policy to discuss the conservative vision of education reform. I was pleasantly surprised by this book because it does not simply rehash the same talking points but contains a number of interesting new ideas and clear expression of the themes that divide political conservatives and liberals when it comes to education reform.

In the News

The Parties Are Polarized, Not The Public

quoting Morris P. Fiorinavia The Red & Black
Thursday, March 5, 2020

Americans today are living in a highly polarized time. Elected officials are at each other’s throats, and it seems like Congress can’t agree on anything. However, it’s politicians who are driving this era of polarization, not the American public. With the primaries underway and the 2020 election on the way, it’s time politicians stop blaming one another and work together for America’s sake.

In the News

Virus Passes Scary New Milestone

quoting Niall Fergusonvia The Morning Bulletin
Friday, March 6, 2020

Coronavirus has already killed more people in seven weeks than ebola has killed in the second-worst outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo in nearly two years, according to the World Health Organisation.

In the News

Medicare For All Would Cost Patients An Arm, A Leg, And $32 Trillion

quoting Charles Blahousvia The Washington Examiner
Thursday, March 5, 2020

A new study purports to show that Medicare for All would actually save taxpayers and consumers money. Academics at three University of California campuses looked at 22 studies on the projected cost of single-payer health insurance in the United States only to find that they would likely save money in the long run.

In the News

The Classical Gold Standard Can Inform Monetary Policy

quoting Michael D. Bordo, Milton Friedmanvia CATO
Friday, March 6, 2020

Watching the frenzy surrounding Judy Shelton's confirmation hearing before the Senate Banking Committee on February 13, one is led to believe that the gold standard is a "nutty" idea, for which no serious economist or monetary policymaker could possibly have a kind word. 

In the News

Paul Schmelzing On The 'Suprasecular' Decline Of Global Real Interest Rates

cited Paul Schmelzingvia Seeking Alpha
Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Eight centuries of new data show a persistent 500-year decline in global real interest rates, challenging existing theories and raising new questions.