Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

The Right And The Moral High Ground

by Shelby Steelevia The Wall Street Journal
Sunday, March 31, 2019

As many have noted, Donald Trump’s presidency is an insurgency. Mr. Trump himself is the quintessential insurgent, doing battle with a disingenuous and entrenched establishment. This was his appeal over a field of more conventional Republican candidates in 2016. But last year’s midterm elections were disappointing, and Mr. Trump has gone wanting for political clout in the immigration fight. 

Featured

No Change In Student Achievement Gap In Last 50 Years

Monday, April 1, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

After more than fifty years of educational policies aimed at closing student achievement gaps, a large divide continues to exist between those at the top and lower rungs of the socioeconomic ladder, according to new research by Hoover scholars.

News
Featured

Operating Procedures

by John H. Cochrane via Grumpy Economist
Friday, March 29, 2019

The Fed sets interests rates. But how does the Fed set interest rates? The Fed is undergoing a big review of this question. We had a little workshop at Hoover, in preparation for the larger May 3 Strategies for Monetary Policy conference, which provokes the following thoughts.

Featured

Can The Federal Government Rescue Campus Free Speech?

by Peter Berkowitzvia Real Clear Politics
Sunday, March 31, 2019

The well-documented inability of American colleges and universities to reverse the several-decades-long curtailment of free speech on campus is a matter of considerable public interest. Whether the federal government is capable of producing effective reform is another question. President Trump seems to believe Washington is up to the task.

Featured

How Putin Outmaneuvers A Blundering United States On The World Stage

by Stephen Kotkinvia The Washington Post
Friday, March 29, 2019

The United States and its allies won the Cold War, a prolonged struggle across the globe, but news accounts nowadays give the impression that the West has lost the post-Cold War “peace” amid a resurgence of authoritarianism. Exhibit A: Russia.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

The Tables Turn In Russian Collusion Hunt

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, March 31, 2019

The irony of the entire Russian collusion hoax is that accusers who cried the loudest about leaking, collusion, lying, and obstruction are themselves soon very likely to be accused of just those crimes.

Analysis and Commentary

China’s Tide Is High, But Is It At High Tide?

by Michael R. Auslinvia Strategika
Thursday, March 28, 2019

If China’s explosive economic growth since the beginning of reform in 1979 is a unique success story, no less impressive has been the concomitant growth of its military and political power, as well as its global influence. Few could have predicted that within one generation of Richard Nixon’s visit to Beijing in 1972, China would vie with the United States for the banner of global leadership. By any measure, China’s efforts to surpass American predominance in the world must be taken seriously, and in some cases, may even seem to have succeeded. 

Black students in a classroom
Analysis and Commentary

Discriminating By Race

by John Yoovia City-Journal
Friday, March 29, 2019

New York City has a serious problem with its schools. It’s not the high failure rates, low test scores, or deteriorating buildings. Instead, mayor Bill de Blasio and chancellor of education Richard Carranza believe, it’s that the best city schools—the specialized or magnet high schools—have too many students of the wrong race and too few of the right ones. Stuyvesant High School, widely considered the city’s most selective public high school, this month offered just seven seats out of 895 to black students. 

Analysis and Commentary

Putin Stands To Be The Biggest Loser Of Ukraine's Elections

by Paul R. Gregoryvia The Hill
Saturday, March 30, 2019

On Sunday, Ukrainian voters will cast their ballots for president. Despite non-stop Russian propaganda and fake news, a disaffected electorate, dirty tricks and slander among the candidates and a dueling oligarch-controlled media, Ukraine is poised to pull off a miracle that few will appreciate.

Analysis and Commentary

Jacob Stegenga On Medical Nihilism

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, April 1, 2019

Philosopher and author Jacob Stegenga of the University of Cambridge talks about his book Medical Nihilism with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Stegenga argues that many medical treatments either fail to achieve their intended goals or achieve those goals with many negative side effects. Stegenga argues that the approval process for pharmaceuticals, for example, exaggerates benefits and underestimates costs.

Analysis and Commentary

The Education Exchange: Fixing The Culture Of Contempt

by Paul E. Petersonvia The Education Exchange
Monday, April 1, 2019

In a new book, Love Your Enemies, Arthur Brooks describes the rise of a “culture of contempt”—a habit of seeing people who disagree with us not as merely incorrect or misguided, but as worthless--and considers what we can do to bridge divides and mend relationships.

Analysis and Commentary

The Federal Minimum Wage Increase Hurt Many Low-Skilled Workers

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, March 29, 2019

We find that increases in the minimum wage significantly reduced the employment of low-skilled workers. By the second year following the $7.25 minimum wage’s implementation, we estimate that targeted individuals’ employment rates had fallen by 6.6 percentage points (9%) more in bound states than in unbound states. The implied elasticity of our target group’s employment with respect to the minimum wage is −1, which is large within the context of the existing literature.

Analysis and Commentary

The Public Good Of Protection From Asteroids

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Sunday, March 31, 2019

The Tanis site, in short, did not span the first day of the impact: it probably recorded the first hour or so. This fact, if true, renders the site even more fabulous than previously thought. It is almost beyond credibility that a precise geological transcript of the most important sixty minutes of Earth’s history could still exist millions of years later—a sort of high-speed, high-­resolution video of the event recorded in fine layers of stone.

Analysis and Commentary

Hummel On Modern Monetary Theory

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Monday, April 1, 2019

If we focus solely on MMT’s [Modern Monetary Theory’s] essential claims about money, distinct from any associated policy proposals, it is neither new nor modern. It simply justifies funding government expenditures by issuing fiat money, which, of course, all economists have long been aware is possible. MMT then attempts to downplay the potential inflationary impact of such financing with manipulations of the government and central-bank balance sheets. But it merely puts the standard analysis into different boxes.

Interviews
Interviews

Historian And Author Victor Davis Hanson Makes 'The Case For Trump'

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Fox News
Sunday, March 31, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson offers historical perspective on political outsider President Trump's election and policy wins.

Interviews

Richard Epstein On The John Batchelor Show (Part 1)

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Saturday, March 30, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses his Defining Ideas article "A Return To Economic Liberty."

Interviews

Richard Epstein On The John Batchelor Show (Part 2)

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Saturday, March 30, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses his Defining Ideas article "A Return To Economic Liberty."

Interviews

For Dems, Mueller Was A ‘Saint’ But Now Barr Is A ‘Sinner’: Victor Davis Hanson

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Fox News
Saturday, March 30, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses the release of the Mueller report.

Interviews

Thomas Sowell On The Ricochet Podcast: Sweet Sowell Music (7:48)

interview with Thomas Sowellvia Ricochet
Friday, March 29, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Thomas Sowell discusses the reissue of his classic book Discrimination and Disparities  as well as the rise of socialism, reparations, and more. 

Interviews

Niall Ferguson: A Historical Perpective On Populist Politics

interview with Niall Fergusonvia The Larry McDonald Series
Friday, March 29, 2019

[Subscription Required] Hoover Institution fellow Niall Ferguson outlines why he looks at history for its predictive ability. Ferguson also explains how populism will change Europe, and gives his view of what to make of the economic changes and trade talks with China.

Interviews

John Yoo On If The President Has Too Much Power

interview with John Yoovia CNN
Monday, April 1, 2019

Hoover Institution Fellow John Yoo notes that the president's power has expanded over time, so congress needs to increase its power and responsibility with checks on the president.

Interviews

Former RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan Speaks To Faye D'Souza

interview with Raghuram Rajanvia Times Now News
Saturday, March 30, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Raghuram Rajan says, "We need significant agricultural reform, in such a way that agriculture becomes a very productive business and becomes a growth engine for the economy."

Interviews

Doc Holliday Interviews Victor Davis Hanson About “The Case For Trump”

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Web Talk Radio
Monday, April 1, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses his new book, The Case for Trump.

Interviews

Rebecca Diamond: The Evidence Against Rent Control

interview with Rebecca Diamondvia NPR
Friday, March 29, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Rebecca Diamond discusses rent control as it returns to some communities. But evidence suggests there are better ways to keep low-income people housed.

Interviews

John Yoo: When Can The President Claim Executive Privilege?

interview with John Yoovia Constitution Center
Thursday, March 21, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow John Yoo talks about possible scenarios and examines how the president and Congress might respond—focusing on potential executive privilege claims by President Trump. Yoo also considers how President Trump might claim executive privilege in other contexts—like the House obstruction inquiry, a possible impeachment probe, attempts to prevent release of notes from his Helsinki meeting with Vladimir Putin, or in pending civil lawsuits against him.

In the News
In the News

An Inflection Point In U.S.-China Relations

featuring Michael R. Auslinvia Powerline
Friday, March 29, 2019

Michael Auslin, an Asia expert at the Hoover Institution, examines what I consider the most important foreign policy issue of our time — U.S. relations with China. Auslin believes this may be “crunch time” for these relations.

Photographic portrait of the “Great and Generous Leader,” Joseph Stalin.
In the News

‘Some People Get Sacrificed, Others Obey’: Inside The Cult Of Stalin Roiling His Georgian Hometown

quoting Norman M. Naimarkvia The Daily Beast
Friday, March 29, 2019

Stalin died 66 years ago this month, but his personality cult still looms large in the Republic of Georgia.

In the News

If Democrats Want To Protect The Rule Of Law, They Can’t Rush The Mueller Report

quoting Jack Goldsmithvia The Washington Post
Friday, March 29, 2019

Democrats demanding the release of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s complete and unredacted report on his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election should pipe down, at least if they want to preserve a reputation for consistency. They spent over two years reminding us how important the rule of law is. They, more than anyone, should know that the law does not permit Attorney General William P. Barr to give them what they desire.

In the News

Joe Biden’s Stale Postmodernism

quoting Peter Berkowitzvia Powerline
Saturday, March 30, 2019
Earlier today, John wrote about the accusation that Joe Biden touched Lucy Flores inappropriately when he campaigned for her back in 2014. I want to focus on the statement Biden’s team put out in response.
In the News

New Study Estimates Dollar Values For Free Online And Digital Goods. Does GDP Need Redesign For 21st Century?

quoting Martin Feldsteinvia AEI
Friday, March 29, 2019

I’ve written a number of times on CD about the possible limitations of official GDP accounting methods (developed in the 1930s during the Machine Age) for measuring economic activity, output and well-being in the Digital Age when so many services are now free or nearly free (Wikipedia, Facebook, Craigslist, email, Internet, cameras, videos, music, GPS/maps, etc.).

Bitcoins
In the News

The Commonality Of The 21st Century: Record Debt, Hyperinflation & Bitcoin

quoting Thomas Sowellvia Bitcoin Exchange Guide
Sunday, March 31, 2019

The grand total of US debt has reached $222 trillion dollar, 300% of the GDP which is rising at the rate f $1 trillion every year. But nobody seems to care with ‘printing’ available as a solution. But with this money creation out of thin air has already turned the currencies into dust with hyperinflation, will Bitcoin emerge as the salvation.

In the News

Education Should Teach Us How To Think: Raghuram Rajan

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia The Times of India
Friday, March 29, 2019

Former governor of the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) Raghuram interacted with high school students in a webinar organized by Krea University on Friday.

In the News

Pompeo Warns China’s Management Of Haifa Port Threatens U.S.-Israel Intel Sharing

quoting Admiral Gary Rougheadvia World Tribune
Friday, March 29, 2019

A lease agreement allowing a Chinese company to manage an Israeli port where U.S. Navy ships dock could undermine U.S.-Israeli intelligence sharing, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo warned.

In the News

‘This Is Trump’s Party’: Republicans Eager To Knock Back 2020 Challengers

quoting Bill Whalenvia The Guardian
Saturday, March 30, 2019

Republican National Committee is said to be taking extra steps to discourage “#NeverTrump” movement ahead of primary election.

In the News

‘The Lessons Of Tragedy’ Review: The Burdens Of Being A Superpower

quoting Josef Joffevia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, March 29, 2019

[Subscription Required] The United States has enjoyed an unprecedented period of prosperity and peace in the past seven decades. A principal reason for this, scholars Hal Brands and Charles Edel argue in their brilliant new book, is that following World War II and the beginning of the Cold War, American leaders and the public shared a tragic sensibility that shaped the postwar foreign-policy consensus.