Hoover Daily Report
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Featured

A Breakfast Policy Discussion With Secretary Of State Michael R. Pompeo

Monday, January 13, 2020
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Hoover Institution hosted "A Breakfast Policy Discussion With Secretary Of State Michael R. Pompeo" on Monday, January 13 at 10:15 a.m. PST.

Event
Featured

American Citizenship Is Eroding

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Highland County Press
Saturday, January 11, 2020

Today, many condemn the idea of nationalism by connecting it to race hatred (e.g., white nationalism). But historically, the modern nation-state has proven uniquely suitable to preserving individual rights. The American nation in particular was successful in uniting individuals of different races, ethnic backgrounds and creeds into one people based on shared principles, a unique physical space, and a common national story. 

Featured

Wealth And Taxes, Part V

by John H. Cochranevia Grumpy Economist
Friday, January 10, 2020

So if wealth is not the answer to "how big is inequality," by any sensible measure, and if the wealth tax is not the answer to "what's the best way to raise money, or to redistribute income," if in fact wealth and wealth taxes are terrible answers to these questions, what is the question to which the wealth tax is the answer, and alarmist measures of wealth inequality to buttress it the pathway?

Featured

The Trump Family And The Corleone Doctrine

by Niall Fergusonvia Boston Globe
Monday, January 13, 2020

It is certainly no cause for glee that the most powerful man in the world should aspire to be a mafioso. Yet there may be worse figures to imitate than Vito Corleone.

Featured

The Odds On A Contested Convention, And A Tie On Nov. 3

by Bill Whalenvia Real Clear Politics
Sunday, January 12, 2020

Although a single vote has yet to be cast in Iowa or New Hampshire, it’s tempting to ponder a pair of summer and autumnal spectacles that probably will go unmentioned in next Tuesday’s debate in Iowa, the seventh such gathering of President Trump’s challengers: a brokered Democratic National Convention, come July, and a “hung” presidential jury – 269 electoral votes for each candidate – come November.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Wealth And Taxes -- Overview

by John H. Cochranevia Grumpy Economist
Saturday, January 11, 2020

I thought that "wealth and taxes" would be a short blog post. It turned in to a 5 part series. Here's an overview, or table of contents in case the whole thing looks a bit intimidating. The most important one, really I think is Part V, "it's all political." The others build bit by bit, well, this can't be the answer and that can't be the answer, so what is the answer, and Part V finds it.

Analysis and Commentary

Remembering The Farming Way

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, January 12, 2020

We need to pause sometimes and remember who these dinosaurs were and what they have contributed. For a while longer, a few are still with us, a sort of collective keyhole through which we can look back into a now unremembered American past, whose codes and mores we simply abandoned—and to our great and present loss.

Analysis and Commentary

Will Lagarde Conquer The ECB's German Image Problem?

by Melvyn B. Kraussvia Financial Times
Monday, January 13, 2020

Since the region’s economic crisis broke out, the eurozone’s central bank has continually found itself at odds with the economic and political establishment of the region’s most powerful country. They have lambasted almost every policy move the ECB has taken, with the central bank regularly on the receiving end of criticism in the mainstream media.

Analysis and Commentary

Adam Minter On Secondhand

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, January 13, 2020

Journalist and author Adam Minter talks about his book Secondhand with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Minter explores the strange and fascinating world of secondhand stuff--the downsizing that the elderly do when they move to smaller quarters, the unseen side of Goodwill Industries, and the global market for rags.

Analysis and Commentary

The Education Exchange: Increasing Teacher Diversity In Massachusetts

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Monday, January 13, 2020

Melanie Rucinski, a doctoral student in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss her new paper, “Racial Diversity in the Teacher Pipeline,” which looks at how Massachusetts might make the teaching workforce better reflect the student population.

Analysis and Commentary

The Tragic Rationality Of Europe’s Iran Policy

by Josef Joffevia American Interest
Sunday, January 12, 2020

In the latest U.S.-Iran clash, the EU has acted rationally. Burned so often by American hauteur, a strategic lightweight like the EU cannot but resort to suasion, mediation, and de-escalation to evade entrapment in a conflict it cannot control.

Analysis and Commentary

China In The Mediterranean

by Gordon G. Changvia Strategika
Friday, January 10, 2020

China believes it should rule the world, so of course it thinks it has every right to control the Mediterranean. In a few years, it will do so, if we extrapolate even just a little. Beijing’s dominate-the-Med strategy begins at the water’s edge, where it has embarked on an impressive ports-buying spree.

Analysis and Commentary

Policy Uncertainty In Japan & Its Effects

by Elif Arbatli Saxegaard, Steven J. Davis, Arata Ito, Naoko Miakevia Japan Economic Foundation
Monday, January 13, 2020

Economic policy uncertainty has taken center stage in recent years. According to an aggregation of newspaper-based indices for 21 countries by Steven J. Davis (“An Index of Global Economic Policy Uncertainty”, Macroeconomic Review, 2016), global economic policy uncertainty has increased considerably since 2015 and reached historically high levels.

Analysis and Commentary

Loury And McWhorter On The 1619 Project

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, January 10, 2020

I rarely watch a whole 1-hour plus podcast but there have been 2 exceptions lately. One is the 84-minute bloggingheads conversation between Brown University professor Glenn Loury and Columbia University professor John McWhorter. It’s on the New York Times‘s famous (infamous?) 1619 project from this summer.

Analysis and Commentary

State Capacity Versus Libertarianism

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Thursday, January 9, 2020

In a recent blog post, George Mason University economist Tyler Cowen writes a tribute to what he calls “State Capacity Libertarianism.” I use the word “tribute” advisedly because Cowen doesn’t really make a case. Instead, he claims that libertarians should be State Capacity Libertarians, and settles for eleven assertions about what State Capacity Libertarianism is, while putting minimal flesh on the bones. 

Football in motion over grass
Analysis and Commentary

College Football: America’s Red-State Game

by Bill Whalenvia Forbes
Sunday, January 12, 2020

As I write this, my niece and nephew-in-law are somewhere in New Orleans — and in something of a progressively impaired state, I’m guessing, thanks to the French Quarter’s willingness to allow revellers to take the party into the streets.

Analysis and Commentary

If Harry And Meghan Move To Southern California, They May Be Royally Disappointed

by Bill Whalenvia The Washington Post
Friday, January 10, 2020

Here’s a question for Britain’s famed bookmakers: Where will the Megxiteers land? Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, have announced plans to spend part of the year in North America, with speculation favoring Canada. But Meghan is from Los Angeles, her mother lives there and the New York Post reports that the couple’s friends Oprah Winfrey and George and Amal Clooney have advised them on living in Southern California.

Analysis and Commentary

The Husband Formerly Known As Prince

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Thursday, January 9, 2020

The royal life proves too constraining for Meghan Markle’s New World sensibilities.

Analysis and Commentary

Some Recollections About G. Warren Nutter

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Saturday, January 11, 2020

At the midcentury mark, economist G. Warren Nutter (1923–79) provided one of the lone dissenting voices to challenge what had become a matter of conventional wisdom among Sovietologists. Whereas others perceived vibrancy and vitality in the socialist society’s industrial growth, Nutter recognized its long-term economic decline concealed behind a politically crafted veneer of propaganda about socialist industrial prowess.

Interviews
Interviews

Richard Epstein On The John Batchelor Show (Part 1)

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Friday, January 10, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses his Defining Ideas article "California Wrecks Its Gig-Economy."

Interviews

Richard Epstein On The John Batchelor Show (Part 2)

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Friday, January 10, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses his Defining Ideas article "California Wrecks Its Gig-Economy."

Interviews

Former RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan Says India Needs ‘Significant Reforms’ To Keep Young Job Seekers Employed

interview with Raghuram Rajanvia CNBC
Sunday, January 12, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Raghuram Rajan notes that India needs to implement significant reforms to revive its flagging economic growth and put more young job seekers to work.

Interviews

Abbas Milani: What Happens Next In Iran? (2:00)

interview with Abbas Milanivia KCBS (CA)
Friday, January 10, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Abbas Milani discusses Iran's missile attack on Iraqi bases as well as whether this chapter in US-Iran hostilities is coming to a close.

Interviews

John Yoo On The Ricochet Podcast: One Hit Wonders

interview with John Yoovia Ricochet
Monday, January 13, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow John Yoo discusses the impeachment of President Donald Trump as well as the legal issues surrounding the Iran crisis.

Interviews

Bruce Thornton On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Bruce Thorntonvia The John Batchelor Show
Friday, January 10, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Bruce Thornton discusses his Front Page Magazine article "The Iran Cringe of the Progressives."

In the News
In the News

Will Democrat Resisters And Coup Leaders Pay A Price

cited Victor Davis Hansonvia KROC
Monday, January 13, 2020

Anti-Trumpers in the Democrat House impeachment hearings and in the Deep State realms of the FBI, intelligence agencies, and State Department, seem to believe that President Trump is not to supposed to make or change domestic and foreign policy. Only the opposition party and non-elected federal bureaucrats can do that.

Stanford Oval
In the News

Stanford Experts Express Concern For Far-reaching Implications Of Strike On Qasem Soleimani

quoting Abbas Milani, Michael McFaulvia Stanford Daily
Monday, January 13, 2020

From Obama-era officials to eminent Middle East scholars, Stanford international affairs experts convened on Friday to discuss escalating tensions between the U.S. and Iran. The panel provided historical context to the Jan. 3 U.S. drone strike that killed Iranian major general Qasem Soleimani. 

In the News

TV’s New Golden Age Predicted By Economists

cited Michael Spencevia KRWG
Sunday, January 12, 2020

Critics have designated this the new Golden Age of Television. The list of recent great TV shows is long starting with the “Sopranos” continuing with “Breaking Bad,” “Mad Men,” and going on to “Game of Thrones” and “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel..” Add to this list “Walking Dead,” “Stranger Things,” “Fringe” and “Arrow”—there is something great for everyone.

In the News

Texas A&M Professors Expand On US 'Grand Strategy'

quoting Elizabeth Cobbsvia The Eagle
Sunday, January 12, 2020

Two Texas A&M professors wrote an opinion piece in The New York Times last week that calls for United States officials to put together a cohesive and clear foreign policy “grand strategy” as the world enters a new decade.

In the News

Democrats' Milwaukee Surprise

quoting Bill Whalenvia Real Clear Politics
Sunday, January 12, 2020

When they meet this July in Milwaukee, Democrats hope they will be anointing the 46th U.S. president. Their nominee won’t be picked in any iconic “smoke-filled room,” but that’s only a certainty because convention halls are now non-smoking venues. But there may be old-fashioned horse-trading.

In the News

New Research Suggests That Secular Stagnation Is Centuries Old

cited Paul Schmelzingvia Economist
Thursday, January 9, 2020

How low can interest rates go? It is a question that worries central bankers everywhere. Since the global financial crisis of 2007-08 rates have been pushed down to unprecedented levels in order to prop up growth. With central banks’ interest rates near or below zero across much of the world, room for further cuts to combat the next downturn is limited.

In the News

Boeing's Biggest Supplier Lays Off 2,800 Workers Because Of 737 Max Production Suspension

quoting Kevin Hassettvia WKTV
Saturday, January 11, 2020

Boeing's largest supplier is laying off a significant number of its employees because of the 737 Max production suspension. Spirit AeroSystems, which makes fuselages for the Max as well as other items for Boeing, announced Friday that it is furloughing approximately 2,800 workers. Shares of the Wichita, Kansas-based company fell more than 1% in trading.

In the News

Vail Symposium Presents Program On Iran, The United States And What The Future Holds

mentioning Abbas Milanivia Vail Daily News (CO)
Friday, January 10, 2020

With Iran’s recent declaration that it will no longer follow the nuclear deal it signed with the U.S. in 2015 after the death of Iranian general Qassem Soleimani in a U.S. drone attack in Baghdad, the Vail Symposium’s program Monday couldn’t be more relevant.