Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Decades Of Being Wrong About China Should Teach Us Something

by Amy Zegart quoting Michael Spencevia The Atlantic
Saturday, June 8, 2019

Thirty years ago this week, I watched the news from Beijing and started shredding my bedding. It was the night before my college graduation, I had been studying Chinese politics, and news had broken that college students just like us had been gunned down in Tiananmen Square after weeks of peaceful and exhilarating democracy protests—carried on international TV. In the iconic square where Mao Zedong had proclaimed the People’s Republic decades before, bespectacled students from China’s best universities had camped out, putting up posters with slogans of freedom in Chinese and English. A “goddess of democracy” figure modeled after the Statue of Liberty embodied their hopes—and ours—for political liberation in China.

Featured

Bjorn Lomborg On The Costs And Benefits Of Attacking Climate Change

by Russell Roberts interview with Bjorn Lomborgvia EconTalk
Monday, June 10, 2019

Bjorn Lomborg, President of the Copenhagen Consensus Center, talks about the costs and benefits of attacking climate change with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Lomborg argues that we should always be aware of tradeoffs and effectiveness when assessing policies to reduce global warming. He advocates for realistic solutions that consider the potential to improve human life in other ways. He is skeptical of the potential to move away from fossil fuels and argues that geo-engineering and adaptation may be the most effective ways to cope with climate change.

Featured

Ill Winds For Democracy

interview with Larry Diamondvia The American Interest
Friday, June 7, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Larry Diamond discusses his latest book, Ill Winds, where he issues a sobering warning: democracy is retreating across the globe, and the foundations of democratic culture are eroding both at home and abroad.

Featured

Liberalism In The Progressive -- And In The Larger -- Sense

by Peter Berkowitzvia Real Clear Politics
Saturday, June 8, 2019

The term “liberalism” ranks among the most contested in our political lexicon. It should also be regarded as among the most vital. In the large sense, liberalism names the modern tradition of freedom. Liberalism so understood was the dominant strand in our nation’s founding. Appreciating the standard accusations against it and why it is worthy of defense is crucial to conserving the best of the American constitutional tradition.

In the NewsFeaturedFeatured

Women Of The Gulag: A Documentary Film Screening

Tuesday, June 11, 2019
Hauck Auditorium, Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Women of the Gulag is based on Paul Gregory’s Hoover Press book of the same name. Directed by Russian American film maker, Marianna Yarovskaya, the film tells the compelling and tragic stories of five remarkable women – among the last survivors of the Gulag, the brutal system of repression that devastated the Soviet population during the Stalin years.

Event
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

The 2020 News Cycle Will Look Very Different

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, June 9, 2019

The Russia collusion narrative and associated Robert Mueller hysteria are all but over. Mueller’s obstruction of justice narrative involving the non-crime of collusion is ending, too.

Analysis and Commentary

The Six-Day War And The Golan Heights

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Military History in the News
Monday, June 10, 2019

Fifty-two years ago, Israel vanquished its Arab opponents in the Six-Day War, waged from June 5-10, 1967. Israeli victory led to its occupation of the West Bank, Gaza Strip, Sinai Peninsula, and Golan Heights. The war and its outcome had significant implications for the future of the Middle East, and its repercussions echo to this day.

Analysis and Commentary

A Conservative Irony

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Sunday, June 9, 2019

An argument that conservatives often make against libertarianism is that libertarians are insufficiently concerned about virtue and good behavior. That argument isn’t empty. Conservatives can probably point to instances of libertarians thinking that certain behaviors should be legal but concluding, on that basis alone, that there’s nothing wrong with such behaviors.

Analysis and Commentary

Students In Large Urban Districts Making Gains

by Paul E. Petersonvia The Education Exchange
Monday, June 10, 2019

Students attending school in big cities made significant gains on NAEP in the years between 2003 and 2013 but those trend lines have flattened in recent years. Paul Peterson talks with Kristin Blagg, a research associate in the Center on Education Data and Policy at the Urban Institute, about what the data show, and about which districts made the greatest gains.

Analysis and Commentary

AER's Efficiency Problem

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, June 7, 2019

Economics has an efficiency problem. The length of papers published in top tier journals has tripled in the past 40 years, expanding to such a degree that readers often struggle to finish them.

Interviews
Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson On China

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Hillsdale College
Friday, June 7, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses China.

Interviews

Michael Spence: Can Economics Help The Fight Against Climate Change?

interview with Michael Spencevia Monocle
Sunday, June 9, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Spence discusses how economics can help fight climate change.

Interviews

Former U.S. Ambassador Michael McFaul: US-Russia Relationship

quoting Michael McFaulvia Salon
Saturday, June 8, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Michael McFaul discusses Russia's relationship with the US as well as what happened in the 2016 election.

Interviews

Jonathan Rodden: Bloomberg Pledges $500 Million To Help Eliminate Coal

interview with Jonathan Roddenvia MSNBC
Friday, June 7, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Jonathan Rodden discusses the realities behind eliminating coal and how Democratic candidates can use issues like climate change to win back rural voters.

Interviews

John Yoo And Jamil Jaffer Says The US Needs To Be On The Offensive With Russia And China

interview with John Yoo, Jamil Jaffervia Fox News
Saturday, June 8, 2019

Hoover Institution fellows John Yoo and Jamil Jaffer weigh in on rising tensions between the US and Russia, and US and China. Yoo says the US needs to be on the offensive with Russia and China.

In the News
In the News

Hoover Scholars Join Cyber Election Report

Friday, June 7, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Scholars from the Hoover Institution were among those who issued a comprehensive strategy for how to protect U.S. elections from cyber meddling, with a focus on the upcoming presidential campaign in 2020.

News
In the News

Author Takes On Race, Economic Platitudes In 'Discrimination'

featuring Thomas Sowellvia The Mercury
Sunday, June 9, 2019

Noted professor, columnist and author Thomas Sowell is 87 years old and has added another book to his impressive output: “Discrimination and Disparities.” His writings have spanned decades, and there is little in this book that he has not written about before.

In the News

The China Challenge

featuring Elizabeth Economyvia City-Journal
Friday, June 7, 2019
Elizabeth Economy offers a penetrating look at Xi Jinping’s aggressively antidemocratic regime.
In the News

Price Transparency Won’t Work Unless Patients Give A Hoot

quoting Scott W. Atlasvia Managed Care
Friday, June 7, 2019

Companies that sell computers, cloths, food, or most other items Americans buy are not required by law to post their prices. But many do anyhow because consumers are always out to save money. Except when it comes to health care, argues Scott W. Atlas, MD, in an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal.

In the News

Quotation Of The Day On The Achilles Heel Of Our Society And Western Civilization

quoting Thomas Sowellvia AEI
Saturday, June 8, 2019

Our whole educational system, from the elementary schools to the universities, is increasingly turning out people who have never heard enough conflicting arguments to develop the skills and discipline required to produce a coherent analysis, based on logic and evidence…… It is in fact the Achilles heel of this generation of our society and of Western civilization.

In the News

Governed By Imbeciles

quoting John H. Cochrane via Marianas Variety
Monday, June 10, 2019

If there was any doubt before now, there can be no doubt going forward: we Americans are today governed by imbeciles. Really. Literally. No hyperbole here. There is simply no way to explain the contents of this May 2019 U.S. Treasury report other than to recognize that it is the product of people completely untethered to economic reality and utterly ignorant of the economics of trade.

In the News

Trump’s Big Win Leaves Critics Sputtering

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia The Washington Post
Saturday, June 8, 2019

Because President Trump emerges as a clear winner from his week-long confrontation with Mexico over our neighbor’s lax enforcement of its southern border, reflexive Trump critics will scramble to find some way of containing what is a clear Trump triumph, which came with assists by Vice President Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who conducted the key negotiations.

In the News

People Are Trying To Figure Out William Barr. He’s Busy Stockpiling Power.

quoting Jack Goldsmithvia The New York Times
Sunday, June 9, 2019
Is he the operator who spun the then-secret Mueller report? Or the straight shooter who later disclosed portions that were damaging to President Trump?
In the News

Europe Is Slowly Recognizing The New Contours Of World Power

quoting Timothy Garton Ashvia The National
Saturday, June 8, 2019

Pinpointing the most significant meeting of world leaders in the northern hemisphere last week was not an easy task. The impressive gathering of western allies to mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings in Britain and France may be the first thing to spring to mind.

In the News

Tension Set To Linger Even If US And China Reach A Deal

quoting Steven J. Davisvia Straits Times
Saturday, June 8, 2019

Even if a trade deal was signed between China and the United States within President Donald Trump's current term, certain sticking points will remain for some time between the world's two largest economies, an economist has said.

In the News

Happy Anniversary, Economy! (Maybe. Sort Of. On Second Thought … )

quoting Robert E. Hallvia The New York Times
Saturday, June 8, 2019

Imagine that you’re about to celebrate a big anniversary, but start running into unnerving problems. First, you don’t know exactly when you should celebrate. Or, really, whether you should celebrate at all — and you won’t have a reliable answer for months, maybe years.

an image
In the News

John Cochrane On Currency Manipulation In Germany And Italy

quoting John H. Cochrane via Econlib
Sunday, June 9, 2019

Several people directed me to a John Cochrane post that has an amusing critique of the US government’s recent attempt to label Germany and Italy as “currency manipulators”. The most obvious objection raised by Cochrane is that neither Germany nor Italy has a national currency to manipulate—both use the euro.

In the News

How Do You Spell M-O-T-I-V-A-T-I-O-N?

quoting Thomas Sowellvia Antelope Valley Press
Saturday, June 8, 2019

This year’s Scripps National Spelling Bee was epic: For the first time ever, it ended with not one spelling champion or even two co-champions, but with eight winners. Winnowed down from 562 starting contestants, the final eight proved unconquerable through 20 rounds. “We’re throwing the dictionary at you,” said Jacques Bailly, the Spelling Bee’s official pronouncer, “and so far, you are showing this dictionary who is boss.”

F/A 18 flying over desert
In the News

ASPI Suggests

quoting Michael R. Auslinvia The Strategist
Monday, June 10, 2019

‘Asia’s premier defence summit’, the Shangri-La Dialogue, was held last weekend and was attended by defence ministers, government officials and think-tank representatives from across the region. Sam Sachdeva’s Newsroom report captured the highlights well. In his Interpreter piece, Michael Fullilove argued that while acting US defence secretary Patrick Shanahan’s performance was poor, it was his ‘plain-spoken, tough-minded and funny’ French counterpart, Florence Parly, who stole the show. 

In the News

A Party Switch That Triggered A Confirmation Landslide

mentioning Michael McConnellvia National Review
Friday, June 7, 2019

In addition to the anniversary of D-Day, June 6 also marks the date on which Senator Jim Jeffords of Vermont switched parties to hand Senate control to the Democrats.