Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

The Dangers Of Medicare For All

by Scott W. Atlasvia The New York Times
Monday, March 9, 2020

It is pure fantasy to believe that the access and quality Americans enjoy today would hold if private insurance were abolished.

Featured

‘Network Effects’ Multiply A Viral Threat

by Niall Fergusonvia The Wall Street Journal
Sunday, March 8, 2020

This isn’t merely a bad flu season. Covid-19 is spreading far faster than most Americans realize.

Featured

The Case For Transferring Federal Lands Back To Native Americans

by Terry Andersonvia The Hill
Friday, March 6, 2020

A proposal by Sen. Steve Daines (R-Mont.) to transfer the National Bison Range – 18,800 acres – to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) has run into opposition on the grounds that it is simply another part of the Republican Party’s federal land “give away” program. Such claims are nonsense.

Featured

California Is A Cruel Medieval State

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, March 8, 2020

The Golden State has become a cruel and unusual place because callousness and narcissism were redefined as caring and compassion.

Featured

Hoover Institution Fellows Feature In “Intelligence Squared” Debate About How To Deal With Iran

Wednesday, March 4, 2020
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Hoover Institution’s Hauck Auditorium was the venue for the nationally broadcast series Intelligence Squared US, which brings together the country’s top thinkers and practitioners for civil Oxford-style debates on the major issues facing America today.

News
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Area 45: Dave Brady: The State Of The Democratic Presidential Race . . .

interview with David Bradyvia Area 45
Friday, March 6, 2020

The State of the Democratic presidential race . . . why the ground suddenly shifted in Biden’s favor.  

Analysis and Commentary

How The Economy Differs For Workers, Consumers And Savers

by James Manyika, Michael Spencevia Business Mirror
Tuesday, March 10, 2020

While the economic gains for many people in advanced economies are significant in some respects, in others they have been eroded by unexpected challenges. We examined a range of economic indicators, such as employment and wage growth, benefits, prices for basic and discretionary goods and services, and savings for retirement, and found that outcomes for individuals in three roles—workers, consumers and savers—present a more nuanced picture than the aggregate data might suggest.

Analysis and Commentary

Richard Davies On Extreme Economies

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, March 9, 2020

Economist and author Richard Davies talks about his book Extreme Economies with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. The conversation explores economic life in extreme situations. Examples discussed are the Angola State Penitentiary in Louisiana, two Syrian refugee camps in Jordan, the rain forest in the Darien Gap in Panama, and Kinshasa, the largest city in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Analysis and Commentary

The Education Exchange: Long-Run Trends In The Achievement Gap

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Monday, March 9, 2020

The Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow in Education at the Hoover Institution, Eric Hanushek (pictured), joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss new findings on the gaps in educational achievement by socio-economic status. Hanushek and Peterson are co-authors of “Long-Run Trends in the U.S. SES-Achievement Gap,” with Laura M. Talpey and Ludger Woessman.

Analysis and Commentary

The Serious Innumeracy Of Some Mainstream News Outlets

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Sunday, March 8, 2020

You’ve probably heard about a tweet by Mekita Rivas last week. She wrote: Bloomberg spent $500 million on ads. The U.S. population is 327 million. He could have given each American $1 million and still have money left over. I feel like a $1 million check would be life-changing for most people. Yet he wasted it on ads and still lost.

Analysis and Commentary

Put “Whole Language” On Trial

by Michael J. Petrillivia EducationNext
Monday, March 9, 2020

Anxiety about America’s approach to reading instruction is all around us once again, making its cyclical appearance like a plague of 17-year cicadas. Much of this is due to journalist Emily Hanford, whose radio documentaries on the science of reading and our schools’ unwillingness to embrace it have earned her awards and accolades while placing the issue of early literacy back near the top of the education-reform conversation.

Analysis and Commentary

Lorna Collier On The Universal Basic Income

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Saturday, March 7, 2020

Lorna Collier wrote a post on the Universal Basic Income that appeared yesterday. She interviewed me for it, but didn’t use anything I said. That’s alright because she took the arguments I made, fashioned them into a short op/ed by me, and gave me veto power. 

Analysis and Commentary

The Brief Case Against Government Banks

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, March 6, 2020

My letter to the local Monterey County Weekly was the lead letter yesterday. Here it is: A bank owned and run by government is a bad idea (“Efforts to establish a public bank for the Central Coast are underway,” Feb. 27-March 4). There is no reason to think that a government owned bank would have lower costs. In fact, the opposite is the case.

Interviews
Interviews

Frank Dikötter: How Do Dictators Seize Power? The Malevolent Careers Of Eight 20th-Century Leaders Explained

interview with Frank Diköttervia History Extra
Monday, March 9, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Frank Dikotter discusses his recent book Dictators: The Cult of Personality in the Twentieth Century.

Interviews

Tim Kane: Is There Too Much Fear Over The Coronavirus?

interview with Timothy Kanevia CNBC
Friday, March 6, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Tim Kane discusses the fear being generated by the coronavirus and whether the general public is overreacting.

Interviews

Lanhee Chen On Armstrong And Getty (25:18)

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia Armstrong and Getty
Monday, March 9, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Lanhee Chen discusses Joe Biden's surge as well as the state of the Democratic presidential race.

Interviews

John Yoo On The Ricochet Podcast: My Corona

interview with John Yoovia Ricochet
Friday, March 6, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow John Yoo discusses the Democratic presidential race as well as the coronavirus.

Interviews

Jack Goldsmith On The Lawfare Podcast: Joseph Nye On "Do Morals Matter?: Presidents And Foreign Policy From FDR To Trump"

interview with Jack Goldsmithvia Lawfare
Monday, March 9, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Jack Goldsmith talks with Joseph Nye to discuss his new book, Do Morals Matter?

In the News
In the News

Former Secretary Of State Condoleezza Rice And Millennium Challenge Corporation Chief Sean Cairncross Discuss Incentive Approach To American Foreign Aid Strategy

Thursday, February 27, 2020
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Thomas and Barbara Stephenson Senior Fellow Condoleezza Rice led a conversation about how the United States can best leverage foreign aid to assist partners and allies in hedging the global ambitions of the People’s Republic of China, as well as to empower fledgling countries to establish thriving economies and governing practices responsive to the needs of their peoples.

News
In the News

How Networks Help Diseases Spread

featuring Niall Fergusonvia WNET Communications
Monday, March 9, 2020

"Niall Ferguson’s Networld" premieres on Tuesday, March 17 from 8-11 p.m. on PBS.

In the News

The Coronavirus Recession Will Be Unusually Difficult To Fight

quoting John H. Cochranevia The Atlantic
Monday, March 9, 2020

Global markets are volatile. Supply-chain disruptions are piling up. Economists are slashing forecasts. Investors are fleeing to the safety of bonds. The coronavirus epidemic is a public-health crisis, and it is morphing into an economic crisis, too.

In the News

Tribalism Is Killing Liberalism

quoting Jonathan Roddenvia Foreign Affairs
Thursday, March 5, 2020

In an interview with the Financial Times last year, Russian President Vladimir Putin glibly proclaimed Western liberalism to be “obsolete.” Self-serving as his remark may have been, Putin was tapping into a global sentiment. Illiberal populism is on the rise on virtually every continent, even in places that not long ago seemed headed the opposite way.

In the News

Walmart Offers Lessons For Market-Based Health Reform

quoting Thomas Sowellvia The Sun
Friday, March 6, 2020

When I needed new glasses, I went to an optometrist for an exam, picked out some dorky black frames, paid my portion and my insurance picked up the rest. Then, by chance, I walked into one of those ubiquitous Walmart optometry centers and realized I could have had the exam and the glasses for little more than the price of the copay.

In the News

Prez Primary Price: How Much Each Candidate Spent In California

quoting Bill Whalenvia CALmatters
Friday, March 6, 2020

What do the top two spenders, Michael Bloomberg and Tom Steyer, have in common? Both are billionaires and both are no longer in the race.

In the News

Coronavirus Could Halt The World’s Emissions Growth. Not That We Should Feel Good About That.

quoting Elizabeth Economyvia The Washington Post
Friday, March 6, 2020

Humans have seemed unable to get a handle on climate change, with global emissions of greenhouse gases continuing to grow every year. But a microscopic pathogen, so structurally simple that it does not even have a single cell and is arguably not even alive, may be capable of accomplishing what our political leaders thus far cannot.

In the News

If Biden’s The Nominee, Might He Pick Michelle Obama As His Vice President?

mentioning Hoover Institutionvia National Review
Sunday, March 8, 2020

The good news for Democrats is that the chance that Bernie Sanders will be their nominee in the fall has receded. The bad news is that Joe Biden is no prize as a candidate, which adds urgency to the discussion about who can juice up his ticket as the vice-presidential choice. Party leaders are now hotly debating the topic.

In the News

Eisenhower Memorial Dedication Set For May. Here's Who Will Speak At The Ceremony.

mentioning Condoleezza Ricevia Washington Business Journal
Friday, March 6, 2020

The new D.C. memorial to President Dwight Eisenhower will be formally dedicated May 8, the 75th anniversary of the day Allied forces declared victory in Europe during World War II. It’s a date planners have long targeted for the memorial’s opening.

In the News

The Spring 2020 Issue Of Education Next Is Here!

mentioning Michael J. Petrillivia EducationNext
Friday, March 6, 2020

In the cover story, Eliot Cohen argues that to the detriment of American citizens, civic education has been unmoored from history in higher education, where the teachers of tomorrow are trained.