Hoover Daily Report
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Decoding The Rules Of Baltimore

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Works and Days
Sunday, May 3, 2015

No one knows what exactly happened to the deceased Freddie Gray, except that it should not have happened. Between what is outlined in the indictments and what will be proven in court is an unknown abyss. But the more dramatic the short-term exuberance over the sweeping indictments, the more likely the long-term fury when the charges are likely to be substantially reduced or unproven in court.

Analysis and Commentary

I'm An Outside Agitator

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Sunday, May 3, 2015

When will people start coming forward and self identifying as actually wanting to exercise their liberty to work for less than the minimum wage? Even the long term unemployed don't seem to do this. Quite an extraordinary amount of ink is spilled defending a freedom that so few really seem to want to exercise. To this I have six answers.

Analysis and Commentary

Taylor On Bernanke: Monetary Rules Work Better Than ‘Constrained Discretion’

by John B. Taylorvia The Wall Street Journal
Saturday, May 2, 2015

We have had a serious financial crisis, a very deep recession, a not-so-great recovery, and now a virtually strategy-free international monetary system. This is not a good record.

Analysis and Commentary

England Must Vote To Ensure Britain’s Liberal Centre Holds

by Timothy Garton Ashvia The Guardian
Monday, May 4, 2015

This country-defining general election is also the most European one Britain has ever seen. With a pivotal role played by smaller parties, and diverging politics in different regions or nations within the state, the outcome will almost certainly be a coalition or minority government: all frightfully un-British and typically continental.

Analysis and Commentary

Three More Presidential Candidates — Plus Another 300 Or So

by Bill Whalenvia A Day At The Races
Sunday, May 3, 2015

It’ll be a busy week in presidential politics, what with three Republican hopefuls making their candidacies official in the next few days. One of the blessings (or curses) of this country is it doesn’t take much to run for the presidency. All a man or woman of proper age has to do is fill out a one-page document called the FEC Form 2 — that, and an FEC Form 1 if you plan to accept more than $5,000 in campaign contributions.

Analysis and Commentary

Michael Petrilli And Michael Brickman: Let N.D.'s Students Keep Meeting Higher Standards

by Michael J. Petrilli, Michael Brickmanvia Grand Forks Herald (ND)
Friday, May 1, 2015

Already, students statewide are taking the Smarter Balanced test, a next-generation exam aligned to the new, tougher standards. This marks a critical milestone not just for the Common Core but, more important, for the decades-long journey to improve America's schools.

Analysis and Commentary

How Sex Could Save Japan

by Markos Kounalakisvia Sacramento Bee
Saturday, May 2, 2015

Survival was the topic of Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s summit last week with President Barack Obama. It was not stated as such, but talks were about long-term economic and military survival for a Japan operating in a world of growing threats and rising powers.
 

Analysis and Commentary

Timothy Taylor On Net Debtor Nations

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, May 1, 2015

My criticism is of the language Timothy and the IMF use to talk about net international investment positions. Both the IMF and Tim claim that if foreigners own more U.S. assets than Americans own of foreign assets, then the United States is a net debtor. That's wrong.

Analysis and Commentary

A Prediction About Brookings

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Sunday, May 3, 2015

Most, and probably all, of the speakers, whatever their view on policy, will fail to make a clear distinction between equity and equality. Why do I say that? Here's what I wrote in "Economic Inequality: Facts, Theory, and Significance:" I would love my prediction to be wrong.

Interviews
Victor Davis Hanson, the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover I
Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson - The Fall Of The House Of Clinton

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Garrison (WIBC)
Friday, May 1, 2015

Hoover fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses whether the Clinton's have had one too many scandals and whether the latest scandal will derail her bid for the presidency.

Interviews

Kori Schake On The Hugh Hewitt Show (38:15)

interview with Kori Schakevia Hugh Hewitt Show
Monday, May 4, 2015

Hoover fellow Kori Schake discusses the Iran nuclear agreement as well as Senators Tom Cotton's and Marco Rubio's amendment to the agreement, which Schake sees as self-defeating.

Interviews

Jeremy Carl On The Hugh Hewitt Show (16:25)

interview with Jeremy Carlvia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, May 4, 2015

Hoover fellow Jeremy Carl discusses Baltimore and the response from the Republician candidates concerning Baltimore especially Rand Paul.

In the News
In the News

Michael O'Hare On Art Museums

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, May 4, 2015

Michael O'Hare of the University of California, Berkeley talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the management of art museums. O'Hare suggests a number of changes that would allow museums to be more effective and to justify their non-profit status--lower admission prices, selling part of their substantial unseen inventory to other museums, and broadening the activities of the museum to include educational exhibits on the creation of art and the commercial side of art.

In the News

Easing Will Wear On Bonds

quoting John B. Taylorvia Total Media
Saturday, May 2, 2015

Then-Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke introduced experimental quantitative easing in the United States in 2008, at the height of the Great Recession. Five years later, Stanford University economics professor John B. Taylor said, quantitative easing “has become counterproductive, even for countries such as the United States.”

In the News

College Tax Credits Do Little To Boost College Attendance

quoting Caroline M. Hoxbyvia Investors Business Daily
Thursday, April 30, 2015

Sure, college education is expensive, but at least government tax credits make sure that needy students get a chance to go, right? Actually, no, says a study from the National Bureau of Economic Research. The study by George B. Bulmin and Caroline M. Hoxby finds that, in fact, federal tax credits have no appreciable effects.

In the News

Hit Job: Daniel DiSalvo on Public Sector Unions

quoting Eric Hanushekvia Huffington Post
Sunday, May 3, 2015

Daniel DiSalvo doesn't like public sector unions. That is the main takeaway from Government Against Itself (Oxford University Press) DiSalvo's new book on public sector unions. He also doesn't like Social Security and Medicare. He even manages to get in a drive-by directed at Senator Elizabeth Warren.

Michael McFaul gives the Class Day lecture to the Stanford class of 2007
In the News

French Ambassador Talks Terrorism, Climate Change

mentioning Michael McFaulvia Stanford News
Friday, May 1, 2015

Michael Mcfaul, director of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, introduced Araud and described the bilateral relationship between the United States and France as “central to everything that we do.” McFaul pointed out that Araud played a key role in the writing of the economic sanctions that eventually brought Iran to the nuclear negotiations table.

In the News

Carly Fiorina Will Run For President As A Successful Tech Ceo. Silicon Valley Says That's A Fantasy

quoting Bill Whalenvia The Guardian
Sunday, May 3, 2015

Even if Fiorina’s presidential run ends as a way to the vice-presidency, campaign-watchers say her six years at HP will shape voter perceptions: “And not to her advantage,” said Melinda Jackson, a politics professor at San Jose state university. “It was a rocky tenure. I think it will haunt her.”

Milani discusses echoes of the Iranian evolution in Egypt
In the News

Former Deputy's Graft Sentence Casts Shadow On Iran's Ahmadinejad

quoting Abbas Milanivia undefined
Sunday, May 3, 2015

“If they act against Ahmadinejad not only are there more documents he might reveal, as he’s often threatened to do, but eventually people will start to ask, 'Who was behind him?'” said Abbas Milani, director of the Iranian Studies program at Stanford University. “And we all know the answer to that question - it's Ayatollah Khamenei and the IRGC’s top command,"