Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Trump Leaves 'Little Rocket Man' Barbs At Home In Stately Un Speech

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia The Hill
Thursday, September 27, 2018

Donald Trump gave his second and much-anticipated speech before the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday to the usual response of not-so-muffled laughter, feigned shock and condescension from much of the American and English media.

Featured

Epitaph For A Dying Culture

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The Kavanaugh confirmation hearings and their endless sequelae have ended up as an epitaph for a spent culture for which its remedies are felt to be worse than its diseases. Think 338 B.C., A.D. 476, 1453, or 1939.

Featured

Are We On The Verge Of Civil War? Some Words Of Reassurance

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Defining Ideas
Friday, September 28, 2018

Recent articles here and here by Victor Davis Hanson—my colleague at the Hoover Institution--paint a frightening picture of the United States as a country teetering on the edge of civil war.  In addition to being an exceptional prose stylist, Hanson is an active combatant in today’s political wars, so his impressions are understandable. As a data guy and a noncombatant, however, I am happy to report that the available data provide grounds for feeling much more sanguine about the state of our country.  

Featured

Renewing Indigenous Economies Policy Symposium

Tuesday, October 2, 2018
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Renewing Indigenous Economies Policy Symposium" on Tuesday, October 2, 2018 from 12:00pm - 1:30pm EST.

Event
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

3 Ways That Colleges Suppress A Diversity Of Viewpoints

by John Villasenor, Ilana Redstone Akreshvia The Chronicle of Higher Education
Friday, September 28, 2018

As colleges adopt an ever-growing array of diversity programs, one form is still in woefully short supply, with little effort being directed toward a remedy: diversity of viewpoints. The lack of an array of freely voiced perspectives on social and political issues is buttressed by a strict set of largely unwritten rules constraining the opinions that can be expressed on campuses, the research that can be performed, the discussions that can be held.

The Supreme Court
Analysis and Commentary

Empathy, Accuracy, And Credibility

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Friday, September 28, 2018

It is considered taboo even to suggest that an emphatic Professor Ford at times was inexact and inconsistent in her prior written and current Senate testimonies. But the result of her sometimes-moving account still remains that she seems to have little recollection of how her still-private therapist’s notes or versions of notes ended up in the hands of the Washington Post and were to be used as corroborating evidence — even though they at times seem to have contradicted elements of versions of her allegations.

Analysis and Commentary

Noah Smith On Worker Compensation, Co-determination, And Market Power

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, October 1, 2018

Bloomberg Opinion columnist and economist Noah Smith talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about corporate control, wages, and monopoly power. Smith discusses the costs and benefits of co-determination--the idea of putting workers on corporate boards.

Analysis and Commentary

The Education Exchange: High School Grade Inflation On The Rise

by Paul E. Petersonvia The Education Exchange
Monday, October 1, 2018

A new study based on data from North Carolina finds that grade inflation increased over the last decade and that grade inflation was more severe in schools attended by affluent students than in those attended by lower-income pupils.

Analysis and Commentary

A Political Comeback At 93

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, September 28, 2018

[Subscription Required] Malaysia’s prime minister discusses his alliance with a man he once jailed, his trouble with the Chinese, and his country’s system of racial preferences.

Analysis and Commentary

Did The Ford/Kavanaugh Testimony Change Minds? For Young Men, Yes; For Young Women, Not So Much

by John Villasenorvia Forbes
Friday, September 28, 2018

Millions of people across America tuned in to see Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh testify at the September 27 Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. But did it change people’s minds? A new pair of polls conducted just before and after the hearing suggests that for young men, it did, and for young women, not nearly as much.

Analysis and Commentary

A Cure For Our Health Care Ills: The Supply Side

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Monday, October 1, 2018

We often hear that governments in the United States should regulate health care more because free markets have made it more expensive than in other countries. It’s true that medical care in the United States is usually more expensive than in other countries, even after accounting for differences in wealth. But the cause is not the free market.

Analysis and Commentary

Supply And Demand Mysteriously Explain Price Changes

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Sunday, September 30, 2018

When nearly 100 drugs became scarce between 2015 and 2016, their prices mysteriously increased more than twice as fast as their expected rate, an analysis recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine reveals. The price hikes were highest if the pharmaceutical companies behind the drugs had little competition, the study also shows.

Analysis and Commentary

The Vodnoy Paradox

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Saturday, September 29, 2018

When I was a child and young adult, my optometrist was Dr. Bernard Vodnoy. I remember his energy, curiosity, and exuberance. He had contracted polio a few months before the vaccine was available, and he was confined to a wheelchair—except it did not seem like confinement. He had rigged ramps through his office and the speed with which he moved with his wheelchair left the impression that it was his version of a skateboard. He was entrepreneurial in attitude and action, founding a small firm to make visual therapy equipment. 

Interviews
Interviews

Niall Ferguson: The Pity Of War A Century On, Was The Great War Justified

interview with Niall Fergusonvia Cliveden Literary Festival
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Niall Ferguson joins a panel discussion titled "The Pity of War, a Century On, Was the Great War justified?"

Interviews

Bill Whalen On The Kavanaugh Hearings

interview with Bill Whalenvia Breitbart
Saturday, September 29, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Bill Whalen discusses Kavanaugh and what is happening in the confirmation process.

Interviews

Lanhee Chen: Legal And Political Analysis Of The Ford, Kavanaugh Testimonies

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia KPCC 89.3 (Southern California)
Friday, September 28, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Lanhee Chen discusses the testimonies of Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh, as well as the Judiciary Committee vote.

In the News
In the News

Hoover Press Book Women Of The Gulag Featured In New Documentary

Friday, September 28, 2018

Women of the Gulag, a new film documentary based on Hoover scholar Paul Gregory’s book by that name, is now being screened. Drawing upon the 2013 Hoover Institution Press book, Women of the Gulag: Portraits of Five Remarkable Lives, the film tells five compelling and tragic stories of women who survived the Gulag— the brutal system of repression and terror that devastated the Soviet population during the Stalin dictatorship. Gregory is a research fellow who specializes in economic history, the Soviet economy, transition economies, comparative economics, and economic demography.

News
In the News

The Rage Of The Left

quoting Shelby Steelevia Patriot Post
Friday, September 28, 2018

Millions of dollars are spent on an investigation of the president without a shred of evidence produced in two years. The presidential press secretary is refused service in a restaurant. Entertainers, writers, musicians, and even public officials threaten their political opponents with violence. Young people riot over political ideas. A politically motivated sociopath attempts to assassinate several members of Congress on a baseball field. People are shadow-banned on social media or fired from their jobs for expressing certain political beliefs. A Supreme Court nominee with a lifelong record of integrity has his reputation destroyed on a rumor.

In the News

Doomsayers Begin To See Cracks In Healthy World Economy

quoting Martin Feldsteinvia The Economic Times
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Over the last decade, the world's major economies floated themselves out of recession on oceans of easy money and low, or even negative, interest rates.

In the News

NPAs: Building Blocks Of Crisis

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia Millennium Post
Saturday, September 29, 2018

India’s NPA crisis has resulted from decades of ignorance towards a crumbling system of regulation – today, we need an urgent remedy to tape the glaring loopholes of generic corruption.

In the News

Berlin Calling

quoting Josef Joffevia Politico
Friday, September 28, 2018

For nearly 30 years, a photographer named Herlinde Koelbl met regularly with Angela Merkel. The photographer asked questions and shot some pictures.