Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

In The Spotlight: Russia’s Future Examined, Innovation Urged

Friday, October 5, 2018
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

A top-down model of governance in Russia hinders innovation, prosperity, and freedom in a country already facing brain drain and an aging population, experts said at a recent Hoover event. On Wednesday, the Hoover Institution kicked off the Governance in an Emerging New World project led by Senior Fellow George P. Shultz. Through discussions and research papers, the effort will explore some of humanity’s most challenging issues over the course of the 2018–19 academic year.

News
Featured

Santelli Exchange: Ed Lazear On The Jobs Report And Rising Interest Rates

interview with Edward Paul Lazearvia CNBC
Friday, October 5, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Ed Lazear discusses employment versus population growth, the rise in part-time workers, average weekly hours, and yield curve steepening.

Featured

One Ford Narrative Too Many

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, October 7, 2018

In the end, the Christine Blasey Ford accusations collapsed. With them went the last effort to destroy Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the United States Supreme Court.

Featured

Hacking Academia

by Niall Fergusonvia Boston Globe
Monday, October 8, 2018

Rosa Klebb is back — as a hacker. In April, the heirs of 007’s nemesis attempted to hack the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons in The Hague, after the OPCW had exposed Moscow’s use of chemical weapons in an attempted assassination.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Neil Monnery On Hong Kong And The Architect Of Prosperity

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, October 8, 2018

Neil Monnery, author of Architect of Prosperity, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book--a biography of John Cowperthwaite, the man often credited with the economic success of Hong Kong. Monnery describes the policies that Cowperthwaite championed and the role they played in the evolution of Hong Kong's economy. How much those policies mattered is the focus of the conversation. Other topics include the relationship between Hong Kong and China and the irony of the challenges Hong Kong faced from U.S. and British protectionism.

Analysis and Commentary

Cathy Young On Putin's Russia

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Sunday, October 7, 2018

In the November issue of Reason, Russian emigre Cathy Young writes a long, nuanced analysis of Putin’s Russia. The whole thing is worth reading. It’s titled “Dissent and Disarray in Putin’s Russia.” Underneath the title is the brief summary: “The authoritarian’s hold on power may be shakier than it looks.” Young does a good job of showing the ways in which dissent is repressed and the ways in which it’s not. I can’t do justice to those nuances in a short space. That’s why I recommend reading it for yourself.

Analysis and Commentary

Self-Destructive Democrats Or Incentives At Work?

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Saturday, October 6, 2018

I’ve heard, or seen on Facebook, a number of people talking about how the Democratic Senators on the Judiciary Committee overplayed their hands with the Ford/Kavanaugh controversy. They were too hostile and too accepting of Ford’s claims at face value, goes the argument. And it backfired on them. They didn’t get their way. Kavanaugh will be sworn in to the Supreme Court today.

Analysis and Commentary

Politics In The Classroom

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, October 5, 2018

I’ve followed a number of discussions on Facebook and elsewhere on the Internet about the desirability, or lack thereof, of professors discussing politics on the classroom. My impression, although I didn’t literally count, is that virtually every professor who is somewhat libertarian and who has discussed the issue thinks it’s a bad idea to do so.

Interviews
Interviews

Law Talk With Richard Epstein And John Yoo: Here Comes The Judge

interview with Richard A. Epstein, John Yoovia Ricochet
Friday, October 5, 2018

Hoover Institution fellows Richard Epstein and John Yoo discuss the Kavanaugh confirmation: the twists and turns of the original allegations, the testimony of Christine Blasey Ford, the damage to the Court’s public standing, whether the time has come to change the confirmation process, and what changes we can expect with Kavanaugh on the court.

Interviews

Adam White On The John Bachelor Show

interview with Adam J. Whitevia The John Batchelor Show
Friday, October 5, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Adam White discusses his Weekly Standard article "The Democrats' "Flight 93" Nomination."

Interviews

Lanhee Chen: Secretary Of State Pompeo Wraps Up Fourth North Korea Trip

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia Fox News
Sunday, October 7, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Lanhee Chen discusses Secretary of State Pompeo's recent trip to North Korea, and whether North Korea is moving in the right direction.

Interviews

A Chip On A Motherboard Is Amateurish Hack, Says Jamil Jaffer

interview with Jamil Jaffervia CNBC
Friday, October 5, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Jamil Jaffer discusses chips made in China that are spying on Apple and Amazon, and gives an overall picture of the cybersecurity and governments.

In the News
In the News

Investors Feel Banks’ Lending Pinch

featuring Darrell Duffievia Top 1000 Funds
Friday, October 5, 2018

Regulation of liquidity in over-the-counter markets in fixed income, commodities and currencies is having a profound impact on funding costs. Professor Darrell Duffie explained to delegates at the Fiduciary Investors Symposium at Stanford University how OTC markets are dominated by a small number of dealers affiliated with large banks.

In the News

Congressional Hearings And The Presumption Of Innocence

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia Legal Insurrection
Saturday, October 6, 2018

The presumption of innocence for the accused in a criminal trial is one of the main pillars of our criminal law. Its importance to our liberty cannot be overstated.

In the News

Security By The Book With John J. Mearsheimer

Tuesday, October 9, 2018
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Security by the Book with John J. Mearsheimer" on Tuesday, October 9, 2018 from 5:30pm - 6:30pm EST.

Event
In the News

Cardoso ’19: In Brazil’s Upcoming Election, Nothing Less Than Democracy Is At Stake

quoting Larry Diamondvia The Brown Daily Herald
Thursday, October 4, 2018

By any metric, the past few years have not been good to liberal democracy. As Larry Diamond, a Stanford University professor of sociology who specializes in democracy, famously noted, we may be in the midst of a global “democracy recession.” Populists with autocratic tendencies have enjoyed electoral success in the past few years, and it appears that this trend is only intensifying — since just last year, over half of the countries assessed in an Economist report saw their Democracy Index rating fall.

In the News

Trump Will Meet Putin On Friday: White House

quoting H. R. McMastervia The Epoch Times
Friday, October 5, 2018

President Donald Trump will hold a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin during the G20 Summit on Friday (July 7). It was confirmed by the White House, Reuters reported.

In the News

Book In The News: A Dollop Of Secret Sauce For CEOs

quoting Niall Fergusonvia MoneyWeek
Thursday, May 10, 2018

Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin’s latest book is not her usual historical study – it interweaves stories from the lives of Lincoln, both Roosevelts and Lyndon Johnson in order to “detail leadership tips for non-political types”, says Kevin Krill on Bloomberg. The book focuses on a crisis each president faced: Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, Theodore Roosevelt and the 1902 coal strike, FDR’s first 100 days and LBJ and the Civil Rights Act. “Americans are strongly attracted to the idea that there are secret sauces,” says Niall Ferguson in The Sunday Times.

In the News

Lessons Not Learnt From The Global Financial Meltdown

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia The Navhind Times
Monday, October 8, 2018

Ten years ago, on September 15, 2008, Lehman Brothers filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy. The mayhem that followed led to the worst global financial crisis after the Great Depression. Like the latter, the 2008 financial crisis has been a matter of much discussion – from Congressional testimonies to saucy Hollywood productions leave alone the academic garbage that it generated.

In the News

2018 Will Be Known As 'The Kavanaugh Year’

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia The Hill
Saturday, October 6, 2018

The year 2018 will go down in the history of American politics as “The Kavanaugh Year.” It is the year when we finally admitted to ourselves that we are not “one nation under God.” We are not even two nations under two gods. We have, in fact, hundreds of religions and many gods. We also have many godless people who do not find that their godlessness unites them. Many godless believers find other godless folks to be heretical.

In the News

Review: America’s Deep History With South Asia

quoting Niall Fergusonvia The Wire
Friday, October 5, 2018

Srinath Raghavan's history of US involvement in South Asia – primarily India, Pakistan and Afghanistan – provides a rich backdrop of lessons for today’s US policymakers as they consider dilemmas in the region.

In the News

Brett Kavanaugh Will Bring Change To The Supreme Court, But Maybe Not What You Think

quoting Adam J. Whitevia Daily Local News
Sunday, October 7, 2018

With Brett Kavanaugh as the newest Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, things are going to be different. But how different?

In the News

Even The Economy Is Partisan

quoting David R. Hendersonvia Bloomberg
Friday, October 5, 2018

There are two partisan temptations to avoid when thinking about a strong economy: One is to assume it’s all your party’s doing; the other is to pretend it isn’t strong. Both sides are currently having difficulty resisting these temptations.

In the News

The Future Of Antitrust: Do Higher Profits Merit The Retirement Of The Consumer-Welfare Standard?

quoting Nicolas Petitvia Forbes
Friday, October 5, 2018

The consumer-welfare standard that undergirds modern antitrust enforcement is under attack. Although the standard hasn’t changed since the landmark U.S. v. Microsoft litigation, there has not been a single case brought by a U.S. antitrust agency under Section 2 of the Sherman Act against a monopolist threatening innovation in the past two decades. What explains this retreat by antitrust enforcers?