Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Yes, Be Very Worried Over Growing Polarization

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Defining Ideas
Friday, October 19, 2018

Beware a fetish for 'data' and faux statistical exactitude.

Featured

Area 45: Is The Republican Party The “Party Of Trump?” With Lanhee Chen

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia Area 45
Friday, October 19, 2018

The Republican Party and President Trump: A marriage of convenience or an alliance?

Featured

Remaining In The EU: Now We Have A Chance

by Timothy Garton Ashvia Drugstore Culture
Sunday, October 21, 2018

To my dying day I shall never forget seeing the Duke of Wellington’s house at Hyde Park Corner surrounded by a vast sunlit crowd waving the European flag. Saturday’s breathtaking demonstration for a People’s Vote may yet prove a turning point, the beginning of the end of Brexit. It was, in any case, a great democratic moment.

Featured

Hoover’s Traitel Building Honored For Architectural Design

Monday, October 22, 2018
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Hoover Institution’s David and Joan Traitel Building won an award on Wednesday for its unique and original interior architectural design.

News
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Wolves In Wolves’ Clothing

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, October 21, 2018

If the New Democratic Party was smart, it would do what the old Democratic Party did long ago: always sound centrist if not conservative in the last weeks of a campaign, get elected, then revert to form and pursue a left-wing agenda for a year or two—and then repeat the chameleon cycle every two to four years.

Analysis and Commentary

When A Venture Capitalist Enters California’s Political Matrix: Innovation Meets The Status Quo

by Tim Drapervia Eureka
Monday, October 22, 2018

I wonder if we still have a democracy in California.

Analysis and Commentary

Ran Abramitzky On The Mystery Of The Kibbutz

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, October 22, 2018

Economist and author Ran Abramitzky of Stanford University talks about his book, The Mystery of the Kibbutz, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Abramitzky traces the evolution of the kibbutz movement in Israel and how the kibbutz structure changed to cope with the modernization and development of the Israeli economy. The conversation includes a discussion of how the history of the kibbutz might help us to understand the appeal and challenges of the socialism and freedom.

Analysis and Commentary

The Education Exchange: Lowering College Costs By Offering Credits For Free

by Paul E. Petersonvia The Education Exchange
Monday, October 22, 2018

There are plenty of college-level online courses available for free, but students who want college credit for an online course may have to pay up to $1,000 per credit, or $30,000 per year. Modern States Education Alliance has come up with a way to combine college-level online learning with free college credit. Students take specially designed courses aligned with tests offered by the College Board. These tests are accepted by over 2,900 U.S. colleges and universities for college credit.

Analysis and Commentary

From Report Cards To Parent-Teacher Conferences, Schools Must Do A Better Job Of Telling Families How Their Kids Are Doing

by Michael J. Petrillivia The 74 Million
Friday, October 19, 2018

“Parental engagement” is one of those self-evidently appealing ideas for improving education. Who doesn’t want to engage parents? What child isn’t well served by more of it? Yet doing it well is hard, because it means shooting straight with parents about how their daughters and sons are performing, and committing to making hard changes and expending real resources to help those children do better. It’s not a program. It’s a promise: to be honest and do right by all kids.

Analysis and Commentary

The Concern About Subgroups In ESSA Accountability Systems May Be Overblown

by Michael J. Petrillivia Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Friday, October 19, 2018

A recent analysis by uber-wonk Anne Hyslop and her colleagues at the Alliance for Excellent Education adds to a long list of reports expressing concern that many states’ accountability systems are turning a blind eye to the performance of disadvantaged students and students of color. The analysis finds that, under the Every Student Succeeds Act, “Many states fail to include student subgroups meaningfully across two of the law’s most important accountability provisions: (1) school ratings and (2) the definitions used to identify schools for targeted support and improvement.”

Analysis and Commentary

Biography Of Christopher Sims

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Sunday, October 21, 2018

One of Sims’s earliest famous contributions was his work on money-income causality, which was cited by the Nobel committee. Money and income move together, but which causes which? Milton Friedman argued that changes in the money supply caused changes in income, noting that the supply of money often rises before income rises. Keynesians such as James Tobin argued that changes in income caused changes in the amount of money. Money seems to move first, but causality, said Tobin and others, still goes the other way: people hold more money when they expect income to rise in the future.

Interviews
Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson On The Larry O’Connor Show

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia The Larry O'Connor Show
Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses the political atmosphere and current issues in the US.

Interviews

Kevin Warsh: Ex-Reagan Advisor: ‘Future Safety’ Of My Kids Depends On Whether US And China Are Friends Or Enemies

interview with Kevin Warshvia CNBC
Friday, October 19, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Kevin Warsh discusses the US-China relationship and the implications for the economy.

In the News
In the News

Former Secretary Of State Talks US-China Relations

featuring Condoleezza Ricevia The Spectator
Thursday, October 18, 2018
Seattle University and more than 100 venues across the U.S. and China participated in an interactive webcast with former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice on the current state of our two countries’ relationship as part of the annual CHINA Town Hall hosted by the National Committee on U.S. China Relations (NCUSCR).
Saudi Arabia Flag
In the News

Jamal Khashoggi Participated In Stanford Panel To Advocate Political Reform In The Arab World

quoting Larry Diamondvia ABC 7 News
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

According to Stanford University, Jamal Khashoggi participated in a September 2017 panel, co-hosted by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. The Washington Post writer also spoke at a seminar titled "Saudi Arabia: Can Economic Reform Succeed without Political Change?" in November 2017.

In the News

Trump Is Forcing China To Reassess Its Strategy

quoting Niall Fergusonvia National Interest
Saturday, October 20, 2018
Trump’s seeming unpredictability, and penchant for muscular showdown, has dramatically altered China’s risk calculations, forcing Beijing to constantly revisit its strategic assumptions.
In the News

Salazar’s New Gig: Avenatti -- Cox Divorce Raises Questions -- 2020 Move? Harris Proposes Middle-Class Tax Break -- Facebook’s Got A 'War Room'

quoting Bill Whalenvia The Politico
Friday, October 19, 2018
“In California’s Central Valley, A Supersize Fight For A Senate Supermajority” by Bill Whalen for the Hoover Institution: “As such, it makes for this oddity in California’s 2018 election: in a state of 40 million residents, the 340,000 registered voters in the 12th State Senate District hold enormous sway over what transpires in the near term in the state capitol.”
In the News

Is Sen. Kamala Harris A Contender For President In 2020?

quoting Lanhee J. Chenvia ABC 7 News
Friday, October 19, 2018

We haven't even hit the midterms yet, but many eyes are on 2020 and the race for president. Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., is already considered a potential contender, but could her candidacy succeed in what's expected to be a crowded Democratic primary field?

In the News

No Visa Necessary To Hear Music Of 'Banned Countries' With Kronos Quartet

quoting Abbas Milanivia KQED
Saturday, October 20, 2018

The Kronos Quartet has a long history of performing music with a political edge. Music for Change: The Banned Countries, coming up Saturday at Stanford’s Bing Concert Hall, is no exception. After the Trump administration issued executive orders limiting travel from majority-Muslim countries last year, the director of Stanford’s Iranian Studies program, Abbas Milani, was upset. "It's shameful on a human basis. But it's also destructive to the fabric of culture in this country. And, I would submit, to the long-term strategic interest of this country," Milani says.

In the News

Report Of The Joint Expert Panel On USS September 2018

mentioning Joshua D. Rauhvia John Ralfe Consulting
Friday, October 12, 2018

As pension experts and economists from the UK, Australia, Canada, Cyprus, The Netherlands and the US, we are writing to you about the USS JEP Report on the 2017 Valuation.