Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

The High Cost Of Good Intentions

by John F. Coganvia PolicyEd
Monday, September 24, 2018

Entitlements grow over time because of a force called “the equally worthy claim,” where eligibility for benefits continually expands until programs no longer resemble their initial, honorable intentions. Over time, entitlements programs have grown into a costly and complex system. Reforms should focus on preserving the programs’ original intentions and putting them back on a sustainable fiscal path.

Featured

Why The Left Is Consumed With Hate

by Shelby Steelevia The Wall Street Journal
Sunday, September 23, 2018

[Subscription Required] Lacking worthy menaces to fight, it is driven to find a replacement for racism. Failing this, what is left?

 

Featured

Quick Notes On The Rosenstein Revelations

by Jack Goldsmithvia Lawfare
Friday, September 21, 2018

There is a lot to chew over in the blockbuster New York Times story about Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein’s erratic behavior in his first few weeks on the job, just after President Trump fired FBI Director Jim Comey on May 9, 2017.

Featured

Obama Won

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, September 23, 2018

By traditional metrics, Barack Obama’s presidency was mostly a failure. The economy, in a new first, never hit annualized growth of 3 percent. His signature domestic policy—Obamacare—caused chaos. Millions lost their coverage and doctors, and paid far more in deductibles and premiums. The stagnant recovery after the 2008 recession was the worst in 50 years.

Featured

Perspectives On Policy: Hoover Institution Launches New Video Series

Monday, September 24, 2018

The Hoover Institution is releasing a new series of videos, Perspectives on Policy, that feature its scholars accompanied by visuals that enliven and emphasize key points of their research and analysis. The metaphors and illustrations create an engaging narrative to bring policy scholarship to life, especially for audiences that are less receptive to charts, graphs, and conventional depictions of data. 

News
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Is Germany Slouching Toward Weimar Again?

by Josef Joffevia The Wall Street Journal
Sunday, September 23, 2018

[Subscription Required] No. Today’s immigration problem is much more limited than the social ills of the interwar period.

Analysis and Commentary

In The Eye Of The Kavanaugh Storm

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, September 21, 2018

[Subscription Required] Chuck Grassley, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, talks about the prospects of confirmation, the effort to give the accuser a hearing, and the #MeToo movement.

Analysis and Commentary

Econ 1, Tiger Woods, And The Crisis@10

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Monday, September 24, 2018

Today is the first day of the fall quarter at Stanford, and I begin teaching Economics 1, the introductory economics course, and the course after which this blog is named. The first day is always exciting, especially with many first-year students in class as is the case with Economics 1.

Education Image
Analysis and Commentary

Betsy DeVos's (Mostly) Strong National Constitution Day Address

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Thursday, September 20, 2018

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos doesn’t get a lot of respect. She’s recently become the object of a mean-spirited board game and an unflattering play based on her (unflattering) confirmation hearing.

Analysis and Commentary

Rodney Brooks On Artificial Intelligence

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, September 24, 2018

Rodney Brooks, emeritus professor of robotics at MIT, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the future of robots and artificial intelligence. Brooks argues that we both under-appreciate and over-appreciate the impact of innovation. He applies this insight to the current state of driverless cars and other changes people are expecting to change our daily lives in radical ways.

Analysis and Commentary

The Education Exchange: Hanna Skandera On Overcoming Divisions In Education Reform

by Paul E. Petersonvia The Education Exchange
Monday, September 24, 2018

The world of education policy has been filled with some nasty battles in the recent years. Hanna Skandera, who formerly served as education secretary in New Mexico, hopes to change that by promoting civil discourse around education.

Analysis and Commentary

Wages Have Grown More Than Many Of Us Thought

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, September 21, 2018

Standard wage data show that between the spring of 2017 and the spring of 2018, real wages in the U.S. increased only 0.1%. But there are three major problems with these data. First, they don’t account for fringe benefits, which are an increasing proportion of employee pay. Second, standard wage data use an index that overstates the inflation rate. Third, each year the composition of the workforce changes, as older, higher-paid workers retire and young, lower-paid workers enter the workforce.

Analysis and Commentary

They Do Care: An Interview With William Damon And Anne Colby On Moral Development

by William Damon, Anne Colby, Pamela Ebstyne Kingvia PhilPapers
Monday, September 24, 2018

What follows is an interview with William Damon and Anne Colby, pioneers in the fields of moral psychology and education. Throughout their careers, they have studied, moral identity, moral ideals, positive youth development, purpose, good work, vocation, character development in higher education, and professional responsibility. In their words, they are interested in the ‘best of humankind’—not only the competencies, but also the character necessary for living a good life—not only for the sake of the individual, but also for society. They have received numerous academic and civic awards and honors.

Analysis and Commentary

Chinese Agents Posed As Journalists In US. And The US Just Did Something About It

by Markos Kounalakisvia McClatchy DC
Friday, September 21, 2018

China’s television network and news wire service have long worked as intelligence gathering operations around the world and in the United States. The American government just did something about it.

Analysis and Commentary

The Incredible Shrinking Senator Grassley

by Alvin Rabushkavia Thoughtful Ideas
Sunday, September 23, 2018
Senator Grassley appears to be taking his cue from President Obama’s Syrian “Red Line” in moving the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court through the Senate Judiciary Committee. Obama laid down a marker for President Bashar al-Assad if he used gas against fellow Syrians, which Obama subsequently disregarded. How did that turn out?
Analysis and Commentary

Thinking On The Margin With Our Sick Cat

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Saturday, September 22, 2018

In December 2016, I posted about the fact that we had started giving our cat chemotherapy for his small-cell lymphoma. It seemed to work for a while, but in November 2017, it seemed to be failing. Joey, our cat, was starting to lose weight. He had been about 16.5 pounds (which was, admittedly, too much) before he got sick, but in November it was down to about 15.5 pounds, but, more important, he was vomiting a lot.

Analysis and Commentary

Without Government Intervention, Who Would Kill Our Pets?

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Sunday, September 23, 2018

As Hurricane Florence barreled toward the Carolina coast, Tammie Hedges took action to protect pets that might have otherwise been caught in the storm – a decision that led to her arrest.

Interviews
Interviews

Richard Epstein On The John Batchelor Show (Part 1)

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Friday, September 21, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses his Defining Ideas article "The Bezos Busters."

Interviews

Richard Epstein On The John Batchelor Show (Part 2)

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Friday, September 21, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses his Defining Ideas article "The Bezos Busters."

Interviews

Marko Kounalakis: The Decline Of Western News

interview with Markos Kounalakisvia World Affairs
Monday, September 17, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Marko Kounalakis talks about western journalism being in decline. With fewer foreign correspondents, international bureaus and stringer networks from US and other western news organizations around the world, the non-Western, often state-run media outlets from countries like China and Russia are filling in the gaps, growing rapidly and broadly. 

In the News
In the News

Renewing Indigenous Economies Talk By James A. Robinson

Monday, September 24, 2018
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Renewing Indigenous Economics Forum talk by James A. Robinson Professor, University of Chicago, on Why Indian Nations Fail on Monday, September 24, 2018 at Stauffer Auditorium, Hoover Institution, Stanford University. 

 

Event
In the News

Shribman's View: What To Look For As The Midterms Near

quoting Michael J. Boskinvia The Daily News
Saturday, September 22, 2018
Six weeks out, and this year’s vital midterm congressional elections finally are coming into focus.
In the News

Column: Is America More Politically Polarized Than Ever? Not Quite

quoting Morris P. Fiorinavia Chicago Tribune
Friday, September 21, 2018
Modern America is sharply polarized, battered by political furies and divided as never before. Moderation is disappearing, we are told, as Americans increasingly shun people of different views. We are split between hostile groups, each with its own TV networks, fast-food chains and sporting apparel — Fox News vs. MSNBC, Chick-fil-A vs. Chipotle, Under Armour vs. Nike.
In the News

China Knows All About Trade Wars And Arrogance: But Does Donald Trump?

quoting Niall Fergusonvia South China Morning Post
Saturday, September 22, 2018

Certainly, Qianlong made a serious blunder in choosing not to do business with the British. Because of a trade imbalance with the Chinese, the British started a lucrative opium business. The opium trade caused a flowback of silver and deep-rooted socioeconomic problems in China. You might blame the emperor’s arrogance but he did not have a global view, as his “world” was confined to China and its tributary system. In the end, China was greatly humiliated in the two Opium Wars.

In the News

Mega Bank Mergers And The Future Of Reforms

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia Livemint.com
Sunday, September 23, 2018

For a while it seemed the Modi government had a reforms plan for the banking system. But now it is left with mere optics.

In the News

When And Where Is The Next Recession Coming From?

quoting Martin Feldsteinvia MetalMiner
Friday, September 21, 2018
At a recent forum for business leaders, I was surprised the topic of conversation was not Brexit or Donald Trump’s latest tweet, or even cricket, but when the next recession would hit.
In the News

The First Time Was Farce, Too

quoting Adam J. Whitevia Powerline
Saturday, September 22, 2018
The Democrats’ current attack on Judge Brett Kavanaugh obviously recalls their failed assault on Clarence Thomas, who has gone on to a distinguished career as an intellectual leader of the Supreme Court.
Stanford Oval
In the News

Stanford Welcomes Inaugural Cohort Of Knight-Hennessy Scholars

mentioning George P. Shultz, Condoleezza Rice, Hoover Institutionvia Stanford News
Thursday, September 20, 2018
Stanford will celebrate the arrival of the first cohort of Knight-Hennessy Scholars on Saturday with Day One, an orientation program designed to introduce the students to each other and to the unique experiences that await them through its global leadership program.
In the News

Dartmouth Welcomes Secretary Mattis

mentioning Peter M. Robinsonvia Powerline
Saturday, September 22, 2018
In an unannounced visit yesterday sponsored by the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth College, Secretary Mattis spoke to Professor Michael Mastanduno’s Government 54 class (US Foreign and Military Policy), as well as Dartmouth veterans from the college and graduate schools, members of ROTC and the War & Peace Fellows of the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding.