Hoover Daily Report
Analysis and Commentary
Latino students in class
Analysis and Commentary

The Way Forward on Immigration

by Condoleezza Rice, Haley Barbour, Henry Cisneros, Ed Rendellvia Politico
Thursday, August 15, 2013

It's easy to conclude, with Congress seemingly gridlocked on so many issues, that comprehensive immigration reform will be yet another casualty of today's divisive politics. But where some may see conflict, we see real progress. What is most striking to us are not the differences, but the similarities, in many of the views expressed by...

Analysis and Commentary

Losing the War on Drugs

by George P. Shultzvia Defining Ideas (Hoover Institution)
Thursday, August 15, 2013
Analysis and Commentary

Obama’s Middle East Mess

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review Online
Thursday, August 15, 2013

When we don’t support our potential allies and encourage constitutional rule, Egypt is the result.

Analysis and Commentary

The True Nature of a Coup Revealed

by Fouad Ajamivia Wall Street Journal
Wednesday, August 14, 2013

It is an uncomfortable truth: Dictatorship often rests on a measure of consent. A people acquiesce in their own servitude, forge their own chains.


Nuclear bomb's tell-tale mushroom cloud
Analysis and Commentary

The End of a Nuclear Era

by James Goodbyvia New York Times
Wednesday, August 14, 2013

U.S. arms control policies have been overly preoccupied with negotiating with Russia.

Analysis and Commentary

Don't Know Much About Geography

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Tribune Media Services
Wednesday, August 14, 2013
Analysis and Commentary

Genetic Engineering Produces A Genuine Monstrosity

by Henry I. Millervia Forbes.com
Wednesday, August 14, 2013

It turns out they were right: Government regulation has run amok and threatens advances in agriculture.

Interviews
Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson on Garrison Radio

with Victor Davis Hansonvia Garrison (WIBC)
Wednesday, August 14, 2013
In the News
In the News

Obama Golfs, Kerry Lectures, Egyptians Die in Droves

with Samuel Tadrosvia Washington Post
Thursday, August 15, 2013

The president has no policy for Egypt -- and the result is chaos.

In the News

The Dangerous Life of Christianity in Egypt

with Samuel Tadrosvia Corner (National Review Online)
Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Samuel Tadros is a research fellow at the Hudson Institute’s Center for Religious Freedom and author of the new book Motherland Lost: The Egyptian and Coptic Quest for Modernity. A son of Egypt whose family has been active in the Coptic revival there, he talks about the unfolding events with National Review Online. KATHRYN JEAN LOPEZ: What are you thinking as you watch events in Egypt? SAMUEL TADROS: It is obviously a sad moment on a personal level. A combination of anger, sadness, fear and frustration. With the exception of my wife and daughter, all the rest of my family and friends are still there. So I am worried for them and for the direction the country is heading. LOPEZ: Not only protesters and journalists, but Churches are being attacked. Whats happening to the Coptic Christians? TADROS: Copts are facing very difficult times. They are especially vulnerable in the villages in the south of the country, where local hatreds have been brewing for decades. Even before the coup, pro-Morsi marchers had made a habit of passing through largely Christian areas, chanting derogatory slogans and writing curses on the walls of churches. In some cases, this is mixed with longstanding local tension and leads to a pogrom such as the one we saw in a village near Luxor. The Egyptian police have proven both unwilling and incapable to stop such acts and protect Copts. LOPEZ: Who are the Coptic Christians and why are they so hated? TADROS: The word Copt is derived from the Greek word for Egypt, which is itself derived from the pharaonic one, so the best answer would be that they are Egyptian Christians. The church of Alexandria was one of the pillars of Christendom in the early centuries. Monasticism was born in Egypt at the hands of St. Anthony, and Egyptian church fathers such as St. Athanasius and St. Cyril shaped what it means to be Christian. The Coptic Church did not accept the decisions of the Council of Chalcedon in 451 over the nature of Christ and has since been separated from the rest of the Christian world. It belongs to a group of churches called Oriental Orthodox, which also includes Armenia, Syria, and Ethiopia. Under the rule of Islam, Copts have fared poorly. Their numbers deteriorated throughout the centuries. Various forms of differentiation and discrimination were imposed upon them under their Dhimmi status. While most of the official restrictions against them were removed in modern times, the social aspects of Dhimmitude remain. Islamists continue to frown upon any attempt by Copts to act as equals, viewing it as an affront to Islam’s supremacy in its land. Even the liberals were largely anti-Coptic, as they viewed Coptic identity as a threat to the emerging Egyptian nationalism they were formulating. LOPEZ: In addition to the human-rights issues, why are the Copts important to Egyptian culture? TADROS: They are not a passing minority. They have been there for over 2,000 years and have contributed enormously to the country’s development. It is impossible to ignore men such as Louis Awad or Salama Moussa when one thinks of Egypt’s great intellectuals or Makram Ebeid or Boutros Boutros Ghali when one thinks of its politicians. LOPEZ: Have you tried to have that conversation with the Muslim Brotherhood? TADROS: Personally, no. Call me a skeptic on the possible transformation of the Muslim Brotherhood. Anti-Christian sentiments are at the heart of the Brotherhood’s worldview. When Hassan El Banna established his movement in 1928, fighting foreign missionaries was on the top of his agenda. The Brotherhood continues to use the most hateful language against Copts. LOPEZ: Is there any realistic hope for the future of Copts in Egypt? TADROS: It’s a tough question. I would go back to the Middle Ages and the story of Copts under the rule of Islam. You can look at those years with a sense of despair at the continuous decline of the Coptic Church, but you also see endurance. Remember, of all the great Christian centers in North Africa, only Alexandria stands. It has been severly beaten, it has been wounded, but it still stands. The last 50 years have witnessed a tremendous revival in the Coptic Church and the church is flourishing outside the boarders of Egypt.

In the News

George Shultz: A Republican Who Accepts the Reality of Global Warming

with George P. Shultzvia Slate
Wednesday, August 14, 2013

When I write about attacks on reality, I wind up shining a light on Republicans more than Democrats. That’s mostly because although there’s plenty of anti-science to pin on the far ends of the political spectrum, the right has made it more of a party platform than the left. As...