Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Why Are So Many Young People Calling Themselves Socialists?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Fox News
Thursday, August 29, 2019

“Socialist!” is no longer a McCarthyite slur. Rather, the fresh celebrity “Squad” of newly elected identity-politics congresswomen – Ilhan Omar, D-Minn.; Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.; Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass.; and Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich.; – often either claim to be socialists or embrace socialist ideas.

Featured

Britain Will Be Better Off As A Junior Partner Of The United States Than An EU Vassal

by Andrew Robertsvia The Telegraph
Tuesday, August 27, 2019

[Registration Required] President Emmanuel Macron of France has stated that closer Anglo-American ties post-Brexit would come at the cost of what he has called “a historic vassalisation of Britain”. Is he right?

Featured

What If There’s A Better Way To Handle Our Democratic Debate?

by James Fishkin, Larry Diamondvia The New York Times
Thursday, August 29, 2019

Our presidential race is a poll-driven battle of teams managing superficial impressions. The public’s responses to horse race polls are based on little more than vague ideas of what the candidates are saying. When these polls surprise (like one — an outlier, to be sure — from Monmouth University released this week showing a sudden three-way tie among Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren), that drives coverage.

Featured

Resist The Drumbeat Of World War III, The War On Climate Change

by David Davenport mentioning John F. Coganvia The Washington Examiner
Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Do you hear the drumbeat of war? No, I don’t mean the threat of nuclear war with Iran or North Korea, or even the trade war with China. I’m talking about the drumbeat of liberal politicians and climate scientists who want us to go to war on climate change.

Featured

Hoover Institution Fellow Launches National Research Survey To Understand Hidden Values

Thursday, August 29, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

How valuable are the things that money cannot buy? Dr. Tim Kane, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, is running a week-long research survey to find out. This survey, in the format of an “economic beauty contest,” as described by economist John Maynard Keynes, is open to all American adults during the first full week of September. One hundred dollars in Amazon gift certificates will be awarded to each of one hundred people judged to have the most insightful answers.

News
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

The Libertarian: The Corporate Responsibility Canard

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The Libertarian
Thursday, August 29, 2019

Serving your stockholders doesn’t mean exploiting everyone else.

Analysis and Commentary

Misses Almost 45% Of Votes And Still Earns A Full Salary: Why Would Kamala Harris Ever Want To Leave The Senate?

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, August 29, 2019

We know that California senator Kamala Harris, as a Democratic presidential contender, is no stranger to the backroads of Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina.

Analysis and Commentary

The Proficiency Bar Is Inching Upward, Yes, But…

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, August 28, 2019

A dozen long years ago, when people were just beginning to take serious stock of what good and not-so-good was emerging from 2002’s enactment of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), we at Fordham, in league with the Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA), issued a 200-plus page analysis of the “proficiency” standards that states had by then been required to set and test for. 

Analysis and Commentary

End-Of-Course Exams Benefit Students—And States

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Amber M. Northernvia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Education reformers in the United States have stumbled when it comes to high schools and the achievement evidence shows it. National Assessment results in grade twelve have been flat for a very long time. ACT and SAT scores are flat. U.S. results on PISA and TIMSS are essentially flat. College remediation rates—and dropout rates—remain high. Advanced Placement (AP) participation is up, but success on AP exams is not—and for minority students it’s down. 

Analysis and Commentary

The “Left Behind” Kids Made Incredible Progress From The Late 1990s Until The Great Recession. Here Are Key Lessons For Ed Reform.

by Michael J. Petrillivia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, August 28, 2019

This summer, I’ve been trying to make sense of the sizable gains made by America’s lowest-performing students and kids of color that coincided with the peak of the modern education reform movement. Today, I wrap up the series by offering some personal reflections on what we’ve learned. But first, let’s recap the facts and acknowledge the vast amount of ground yet to cover.

Global Image
Analysis and Commentary

Update On Trees And Global Warming

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Last week I wrote an article in which I suggested planting trees as potentially a much cheaper way to slow or even reverse global warming, cheaper, that is, than a carbon tax.

Interviews
Interviews

Michael Petrilli On The Education Gadfly Show: Boosting Student Outcomes With End-Of-Course Exams

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli discusses the new Fordham report on end-of-course exams and student outcomes.

In the News
In the News

How The Taylor Rule Fits In A Zero-Bound World

featuring John B. Taylorvia Financial Review
Thursday, August 29, 2019

John B. Taylor, who authored – and gave his name to – one of the most celebrated rules in central banking over the past quarter century, says he is amazed at its resilience as a guide for policymakers.

In the News

What Is The Cost Of The Permanent Federal Regulatory Bureaucracy?

quoting John H. Cochranevia Forbes
Wednesday, August 28, 2019

It is well known that businesses constantly seek favors from government. The phenomenon is called "rent-seeking" by economists, and it gets lots of attention. Elon Musk of Tesla fame and his various subsidies are prominent in the news now, for example. Regulations, like subsidies, also transfer wealth. Some businesses like them since they can hobble rivals more.

In the News

Like The Empire Itself, The British Pound Is Not What It Used To Be

quoting Niall Fergusonvia NPR
Thursday, August 29, 2019

The British pound sterling is the oldest currency still in use in the world, dating to the time when Britain was little more than a collection of warring fiefdoms regularly plundered by Vikings.

In the News

Tulsi Gabbard Fights Back Against Big Tech

quoting Richard A. Epsteinvia 71Republic
Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Recently, Democratic presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard went on Tucker Carlson, defending her decision to sue Google for allegedly suspending her campaign ads. According to Gabbard, this move on behalf of Google constitutes “election interference.” Gabbard further went on to say that her lawsuit would underscore the extensive power of Big Tech, and shed light on its violation of free speech. Gabbard’s gripes are very reminiscent of the feelings many conservatives also have towards Big Tech.

In the News

The Power Of Purpose

quoting William Damonvia Thrive Global
Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Over twenty years ago, like many college students in the throes of existential questions, I had half-knowingly embarked on a quest for meaning. For much of the time, I felt like a castaway in uncertain seas with only gut instinct and grit as my guide. In retrospect, I can see that if I would have had better tools and guides, my disorientation, and the angst that followed in its wake, could have been dramatically reduced.

In the News

How To Replace Howard Zinn’s Communist Account Of U.S. History For American Kids

mentioning Victor Davis Hansonvia The Federalist
Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Americans' affections for and knowledge of their country need to be fed. The lovely new history 'Land of Hope' does so. Another new book, 'Debunking Howard Zinn,' provides medicine to those food cannot restore.

In the News

Melton Family’s Tribute To ‘Brave’ Polish Woman Who Survived Siberian Ordeal

mentioning Hoover Institutionvia Melton Times
Wednesday, August 28, 2019

A Polish woman who was deported with her family to Siberia as a child by the Russian army before making her life in Melton following the Second World War has died aged 94.