Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Why The Fed Should Heed The Market

by Edward Paul Lazearvia The Wall Street Journal
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, perhaps hoping to instill confidence, said in his press conference last month, “Of course we’re always data dependent.” But which data? There are countless indicators economists can seek out to track growth, employment and inflation. Picking the right ones is half the battle in making sound predictions.

Featured

How Sweden Overcame Socialism

by Jesús Fernández-Villaverde, Lee Ohanianvia The Wall Street Journal
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Nearly half of millennials say they prefer socialism to capitalism, but what do they mean? “My policies most closely resemble what we see in the U.K., in Norway, in Finland, in Sweden,” Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez told “60 Minutes.” Yet Sweden’s experiment with socialist policies was disastrous, and its economic success in recent decades is a result of market-based reforms.

Mexican Flag
Featured

The Ironies Of Illegal Immigration

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Mexico does not explain why its citizens wish to leave their birth country — or why they are eager to enter a country ridiculed by the Mexican press and government.

Featured

California Gets A New Governor—And A Voyage Into Expensive Progressive Waters

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, January 10, 2019

We’re only four days into a new administration, and I’ll admit that I’m struggling to put California’s fortieth governor in historical context.

Featured

Eureka Issue 1901: Advice For Governor Newsom

via Eureka
Thursday, January 10, 2019

In this edition of Eureka, we focus on advice for Governor Gavin Newsom. 

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

The Libertarian: Emergency Powers And The Presidency

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The Libertarian
Thursday, January 10, 2019

Can President Trump act on immigration without Congress?

Analysis and Commentary

Rekindling Moral Education: A Worthy Challenge For Schools Of Choice

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Late December brought not one but two excellent disquisitions on moral education, both the importance of rekindling an emphasis on it in American schools and some thoughtful advice as to how to go about it. Each does a nice job of explaining why such rekindling is needed at this time—though unless you’re completely off the grid you already know why: not so much because of troubles with private morality (teenage pregnancy rates are down, etc.) but because of manifest failures in the public and semi-public squares: with honesty, integrity, and trustworthiness, both on the part of elected officials and in the small venues where we observe an excess of selfishness, cheating, laziness, and willingness to be a burden on others.

Analysis and Commentary

The Curtain Rises On The Newsom Administration

by Bill Whalenvia Eureka
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

The new year in Sacramento didn’t start with a bang, but it definitely produced more than a whimper of change.

Analysis and Commentary

Why Disparate Impact Theory Is A Bad Fit For School Discipline

by Michael J. Petrillivia Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Thursday, January 10, 2019

In 2014, in response to findings that African American students were three times as likely to be suspended as white students, the Obama Administration sent a lengthy “Dear Colleague” letter to school districts nationwide, spelling out a new policy on school discipline, motivated by disparate impact theory. It warned administrators that they could be subject to a federal civil rights investigation if their data showed significant racial disparities in the use of suspensions or expulsions, and could be found guilty of discrimination even if they had race-neutral discipline policies that were being applied even-handedly.

Analysis and Commentary

How To Get Schools To Use Practices That Work

by Michael J. Petrillivia Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Before the holiday break, I wrote a series of posts discussing how we might turn the “End of Education Policy” (as I see it) into a Golden Age of Educational Practice. It’s time to pick up where I left off. To be honest, much of what I published in late 2018 amounted to throat-clearing, a warm-up before the main event.

Interviews
Interviews

Elizabeth Economy: Trade War Adding To Mounting Pressures On China's Xi Jinping (1:24)

by Elizabeth Economyvia CNBC
Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Elizabeth Economy breaks down the potential impact of the talks between the United States and China.

Interviews

Lanhee Chen On The Armstrong And Getty Show

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia Armstrong and Getty
Thursday, January 10, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Lanhee Chen discusses President Trump's speech on border security.

In the News
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In the News

The Market For Regulation In The Internet Of Things

via Hoover IP2
Thursday, January 10, 2019

Hoover Institution Working Group on Intellectual Property, Innovation, and Prosperity conference on January 10-11, 2019.

In the News

Media, Politicians Use Russia To Distract From Their Own Failures

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia NewsMax
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

As we enter the new year, we can already see that, as in 2018, China and Russia will continue to dominate the international news cycle. This is thus a good time to pause, reflect, and understand the nature of the genuine threats to our national security.

In the News

California Lawmakers Aim At Justice But They Lack Truly Just Motives

quoting Thomas Sowellvia Daily Press
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

The super-majority Democrat California State Legislature brought us New Year’s greetings with a raft of legislation that doubtless it believes helps to alleviate or reduce injustice among our nearly 40 million inhabitants, but it fails once again. By seeking to shape a future free of discomfort despite the high price that questionable goal requires, our legislators actually do great injustice.

In the News

Students In Washington’s Charter Schools And Public Schools Learn At Similar Rates, Stanford Report Finds

quoting Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia The Seattle Times
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

The study is the first in-depth analysis of student performance for the state's young charter school network, which was granted more stable legal footing by a state Supreme Court ruling in 2018.