Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Enhancing Economic Growth Through Immigration

by Edward Paul Lazearvia PolicyEd
Thursday, January 17, 2019

Immigration has always been a vital component of economic growth in the United States, and certain types of immigrants are more likely to start businesses than others. Younger, more educated immigrants are more likely to be entrepreneurial, as are immigrants who come from countries that haven’t traditionally sent many people to America. The United States could boost its economy if it rebalanced its immigration system to give them a preferred path for green cards.

Featured

Niall Ferguson: Open Societies Can Overcome Network Disruptions If They Adapt

Monday, January 14, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Online social networks are worsening political polarization in many democracies today, says Niall Ferguson, a historian and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.

News
Teachers picket in La Habra last December
Featured

LA Teachers Strike To Preserve Their Ruinous Monopoly

by Lee Ohanian quoting Eric Hanushekvia The Hill
Thursday, January 17, 2019

Last week, 31,000 Los Angeles Unified School District teachers represented by the United Teachers of Los Angeles (UTLA) union went on strike for the first time in 30 years.

Featured

Sorry, But Trump Is Not ‘Tough On Russia’

by Michael McFaulvia The Washington Post
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

To defend himself from accusations of collusion or collaboration with Russian government officials during the 2016 presidential election and after, President Trump recently repeated a familiar claim: “I have been FAR tougher on Russia than Obama, Bush or Clinton. Maybe tougher than any other President.”

Featured

Economists’ Statement On Carbon Dividends

mentioning Michael J. Boskin, Martin Feldstein, George P. Shultz, Michael Spencevia The Wall Street Journal
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Global climate change is a serious problem calling for immediate national action. Guided by sound economic principles, we are united in the following policy recommendations. I. A carbon tax offers the most cost-effective lever to reduce carbon emissions at the scale and speed that is necessary. By correcting a well-known market failure, a carbon tax will send a powerful price signal that harnesses the invisible hand of the marketplace to steer economic actors towards a low-carbon future.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Trump’s Re-Election Chances May Be Better Than You Think

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

What are Donald Trump’s chances for re-election in 2020? If history is any guide, pretty good. In early 1994, Bill Clinton’s approval rating after two years in office hovered around a dismal 40 percent. The first midterm elections of the Clinton presidency were an utter disaster.

Analysis and Commentary

Los Angeles Teachers’ Strike: Why Isn’t The City’s Mayor Calling Balls And Strikes?

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, January 17, 2019

With all due respect to the gridlock back in the nation’s capital, there’s a far more compelling government impasse afoot.

Analysis and Commentary

A Nation At Hope (Sic)

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

The long-awaited report of the National Commission on Social, Emotional, & Academic Development is now out and will doubtless make some waves within education’s chattering classes and more broadly among practitioners. But will anyone else notice or care? Let me state up front that—aside from its abominably ungrammatical, if slightly clever, title—it’s a solid, respectable product, the sort of thing one rightly expects from the Aspen Institute, the blue-ribbon panel that produced it, and the eminent foundations that paid for it. It’s worth paying attention to. But I will also admit to a fairly serious case of déjà vu.

Analysis and Commentary

Cyberspectives: Exploring Cybersecurity And Geopolitics With Chris Bronk

interview with Chris Bronkvia Cyberspectives
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

In this episode, Chris Bronk discusses the geopolitical implications of cybersecurity, including how control of information—and misinformation—impacts international relations.

Analysis and Commentary

Reflecting On Education Week'S 10 Big Ideas Of 2019

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Education Week opened the year with a second annual special issue titled “10 Big Ideas” with, wrote editor Elizabeth Rich, “the potential to define—or redefine—education in the year ahead.” Each includes a staff-written essay accompanied by a commentary penned by an outside researcher, practitioner, or advocate.

Analysis and Commentary

Increased Workforce Participation Alone Won’t Fix Social Security Finances

by Charles Blahousvia Economics One
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Last month, Morgan Stanley published a research report projecting that US labor force growth will exceed Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projections starting in the 2020s, and also asserting that this faster growth “should” delay Social Security’s insolvency, “perhaps by decades.” Specifically, the report stated that “a faster increase in the pool of covered workers is an important factor in the Social Security Trustees’ ‘low cost’ scenario, which would delay the date at which the Social Security trust fund reserves could become depleted from 2034 to 2062.”

Analysis and Commentary

Practicing Humility When It Comes To Evidence-Based Practice

by Michael J. Petrillivia Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

As I’ve embarked on my weeks-long discussion of how to usher in a Golden Age of Educational Practice, I have heard—often on Twitter, sometimes via email—a clear and compelling message: For the love of God, mike, do not turn this call for evidence based practices into another excuse for so-called experts to tell teachers what to do, or to foist your own preferred practices upon the nation’s schools. Show some humility, man. To which I say: I hear you, my friends, I really do.

Analysis and Commentary

Does Losing Less Mean That You Are Winning?

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

I started to write a blog post critical of an article by Lawrence Solomon, in Canada’s Financial Post, titled “Remember Trump’s supposedly ‘lose-lose’ trade war? He’s winning, China’s losing.” (Financial Post, January 11, 2019.) I thought he was making a basic mistake. I was wrong. It was my mistake. But you will see why the title above is not ideal, given the conclusion I’ve now come to.

Interviews
Interviews

Jonathan Rodden On EdgeFoundationInc

interview with Jonathan Roddenvia EdgeFoundationInc
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Jonathan Rodden discusses voting, districts, and how voting districts can determine who gets represented and whose policies shape the laws.

Interviews

Michael Auslin On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Michael R. Auslinvia The John Batchelor Show
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Auslin discusses the threat from China's predatory behavior and how President Trump is the first US president to take the Chinese threat seriously.

Interviews

Jamil Jaffer On The Larry O'Connor Show

interview with Jamil Jaffervia The Larry O'Connor Show
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Jamil Jaffer discusses the confirmation hearing of William Barr.

In the News
In the News

Silence Of The Dems

featuring Victor Davis Hansonvia Powerline
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Victor Davis Hanson brings his scholarly temperament and detachment to what he calls “The new, new anti-Semitism.” The new, new anti-Semitism has manifested itself in the House of Representatives, but I seriously doubt that it will be discussed or condemned there any time soon. Professor Hanson deserves a Pulitzer Prize for commentary, but that won’t be happening any time soon either.

In the News

Trump’s Pivot To Asia

featuring Michael R. Auslinvia Powerline
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Michael Auslin of the Hoover Institution commends President Trump for his pivot to Asia. He says it’s “shaping up to be more substantive and potentially transformative than the one the Obama Administration regularly touted.”

Milton Friedman
In the News

Milton Friedman On ‘Fair’ Versus ‘Free’

featuring Milton Friedmanvia AEI
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Over a period of almost 20 years between 1966 and 1984, Milton Friedman wrote more than 300 op-eds for Newsweek. On July 4, 1977, Friedman’s weekly Newsweek column was titled “Fair versus Free.” Here’s an excerpt of that op-ed below, with some of my additions to focus Friedman’s general comments on “fair” versus “free” more specifically on the distinction between”fair” trade versus “free” trade that we’ve heard so much about recently.

Federal Reserve
In the News

Can The President Win His Fight With The Federal Reserve?

quoting Darrell Duffievia News Wise
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

President Trump’s recent attack on the Federal Reserve is a breach of protocol that both Republican and Democratic presidents have observed for decades. According to Stanford GSB finance professor Darrell Duffie, Trump is picking a fight with the Fed that he ultimately won’t win. It’s not only that the Federal Reserve has carefully created a political independence over the past half-century, says Duffie. It’s also that Fed officials recognize their jobs may become much more difficult if investors and the public suspect that the central bank could yield to political pressure.

In the News

Facebook Urged To Give Users Greater Control Over What They See

quoting Timothy Garton Ashvia Tech Crunch
Thursday, January 17, 2019

Academics at the universities of Oxford and Stanford think Facebook should give users greater transparency and control over the content they see on its platform. They also believe the social networking giant should radically reform its governance structures and processes to throw more light on content decisions, including by looping in more external experts to steer policy.

In the News

Victor Davis Hanson On Who Trump Haters Hate The Most

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia Rush Limbaugh Show
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

I’m holding a column/essay written today by Victor Davis Hanson. The title of his piece is “A License to Hate,” and it is a piece that points out and marvels at the ability of the left to engage in some of the most insultingly hate-filled rhetoric in the form of allegations against you, me, and Trump, and they never get called on it.

In the News

William Barr Emerges From Confirmation Hearing Without A Scratch, And Might Actually Get Democratic Votes, Too

quoting Jack Goldsmithvia Fox News
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Former Attorney General William Barr underwent his confirmation hearing on Tuesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee under the new chairmanship of Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and emerged without a scratch, scrape or bruise. He came across as a consummate professional and a deeply knowledgeable, capable, and very experienced attorney – someone former Attorney General Michael Mukasey has called “probably the best-qualified nominee for U.S. attorney general since Robert Jackson in 1940.”

In the News

The Record-Breaking Government Shutdown Is Putting The US At Risk Of A Major Cyber Attack

quoting Andrew Grottovia Business Insider
Thursday, January 17, 2019

The ongoing US government shutdown is putting the nation at serious risk of cyber attack, since as thousands of employees that monitor the nation's defense systems are not at work. Experts warn that the country is at greater risk of falling victim to a major attack and falling behind in the cyber arms race, as the shutdown gives those who want to target the US an advantage.

In the News

2019 Could Be A Historic Year For The Constitution’s Religion Clauses

quoting John Yoovia Townhall
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Legal experts John Yoo and James Phillips have recently argued that 2019 could be a historic year of precedent-setting Supreme Court cases because this is the first time since 1936 that the Court has had a consistent conservative majority. This Court could return us to an era of judicial restraint where the majority of the Justices affirm that it is not their place to create or change the law, only to fairly enforce the law that already exists.