Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Social Safety Nets

by John F. Cogan, Edward Paul Lazear, Lee Ohanian, Daniel Heilvia PolicyEd
Thursday, July 11, 2019

The federal government spends trillions of dollars each year on social safety net programs that take many different forms. Some provide cash assistance, and others provide health care, food, or housing. With so much money being spent on so many programs, it can be difficult to comprehend the extent of the US social safety net, its effectiveness, and its shortcomings. 

Featured

Edward Lazear On The Economy: Best Indicator Of Future Growth Is The Market

interview with Edward Paul Lazearvia Fox Business
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Ed Lazear talks about the outlook for US economic growth, Federal Reserve policy, US trade talks with China, and the potential regulation of big tech.

Featured

Make Central America Great Again

by George P. Shultz, Pedro Aspevia The Wall Street Journal
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

To stanch the flow of illegal aliens, pour U.S. foreign aid into improving their home countries.

Featured

There May Not Be A Right To Civic Education, But There's Certainly A Crisis

by David Davenportvia The Washington Examiner
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

When something has been exaggerated or overdone, people often say “Don’t make a federal case out of it!” But students and parents in Rhode Island have done precisely that, taking the state and several of its officials to federal court over the failure of their schools to provide an adequate civic education. We are not taught how “to function properly as civic participants,” including voting, serving on juries and the like, say the students.

Featured

U.S.–China Trade Tensions

via Strategika
Thursday, July 11, 2019

Strategika Issue 59 is now available online. Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Demystifying Sino-U.S. Decoupling

by Michael R. Auslinvia Strategika
Thursday, July 11, 2019

“He’s a New York real estate developer,” a non-politically involved acquaintance argues, explaining that President Donald Trump knows that any deal as complex as the one he is trying to negotiate with China over trade will take time, “even years.” That explanation may be as valid as any of the ostensibly more informed takes by professional policy watchers. It also is a useful caution against placing artificial, media-driven timetables on what is turning into the most significant policy showdown between Washington and Beijing since the normalization of diplomatic ties forty years ago.

Analysis and Commentary

Democratic Candidates Are Running A Race Of Inauthenticity

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

An epidemic of false identities, massaged resumes and warped ancestries has broken out among the current Democratic presidential primary candidates.

Analysis and Commentary

Public Attitudes Toward Gifted Education: Supportive, Complacent, Incomplete

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via The Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

The Institute for Educational Advancement recently completed an elaborate survey of public views toward many aspects of the education of gifted children and the results are enlightening, sobering—and complicated.

Analysis and Commentary

California Can’t Avoid The Next “Big One” Can It Weather The Political Aftershock?

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, July 11, 2019

That California would find itself dealing with two large earthquakes over the Fourth of July weekend shouldn’t come as a surprise, as temblors have no consideration for human needs. The last giant quake to disrupt Los Angeles? It happened twenty-five years ago, at 4:31 a.m. on a Monday morning in January, leaving millions of sleep-deprived Angelenos to stumble around in the predawn dark.

Analysis and Commentary

Roberts Thwarted Trump, But The Census Ruling Has A Second Purpose

by John Yoo, James Phillipsvia The Atlantic
Thursday, July 11, 2019

The Supreme Court rejected Trump’s citizenship question, but the ruling serves a conservative counterrevolution against the administrative state.

Analysis and Commentary

David Davenport: The Elephant In The Policy Room

by David Davenportvia Townhall Review
Thursday, July 11, 2019

You would never know this listening to presidential candidates but Social Security, in crisis mode for a while, will begin paying out more than it takes in next year. The reserve fund will be depleted in 16 years, meaning seniors would face 20 percent cuts in their payments.

Analysis and Commentary

A Hypothesis: NCLB-Era Achievement Gains Stemmed Largely From Declining Child Poverty Rates

by Michael J. Petrillivia The Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

It’s long been understood that, on average, there’s a strong relationship between a child’s socioeconomic status and his or her academic outcomes. It’s also the case that when poor families become less poor—either because of more “market income” or due to social programs like the Earned Income Tax Credit—their children tend to do better in school.

Interviews
Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson: "A Western Globalized Phenomenon That Citizenship Doesn't Mean Much Anymore"

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Fox News
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses the citizenship question on the census.

Interviews

Richard Epstein On The John Batchelor Show (Part 1 Of 2)

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

(Part 1) Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses his Defining Ideas article "Nike And Kaepernick."

Interviews

Richard Epstein On The John Batchelor Show (Part 2 Of 2)

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

(Part 2) Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses his Defining Ideas article "Nike And Kaepernick."

In the News
In the News

A Modest Proposal On Housing Border-Crossers And Other Commentary

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia New York Post
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Conservative: Where To House Border-Crossers Reviewing the controversy over detention centers for illegal border-crosses, National Review’s Victor Davis Hanson proposes a tongue-in-cheek “solution” to housing people now stuck in what some Democrats call “concentration camps”: Since it’s summer, “America’s 4,000 colleges and universities have plenty of empty dorm space and underutilized ­facilities.”

In the News

Trump And Newsom Think Alike On Deadly Wildfires

quoting Terry Andersonvia The Press-Enterprise
Tuesday, July 9, 2019

On June 12 the Trump administration proposed easing environmental regulations for forest-thinning on federal land to speed up wildfire prevention. Before accusing President Trump of clearcutting California, it’s important to note that Gov. Gavin Newsom is quietly taking similar actions, an admission that environmental mandates are fueling catastrophic wildfires.

In the News

President Donald Trump Is The Chemo During These Divisive Times

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia Jewish Journal
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Disruptive? Definitely. Messy? Frequently. Unpleasant? Of course.

In the News

There's A Terrifying Trend On The Internet That Could Be Used To Ruin Your Reputation, And No One Knows How To Stop It

quoting John Villasenorvia Times Union (NY)
Thursday, July 11, 2019

In a video that surfaced about a month ago, Mark Zuckerberg blankly stared into the camera from what appeared to be an office. He made a simple request of his viewers. "Imagine this for a second," he said. "One man, with total control of billions of people's stolen data. All their secrets, their lives, their futures."

In the News

Worthless Paper: We Don’t Need No Degree!

quoting Michael Spencevia Deccan Herald
Thursday, July 11, 2019

If one rummages through economic theories, one finds three powerful ideas that show why education is important for society. Firstly, education ‘converts’ humans into human capital. This makes us productive and creative.

In the News

Accord Study Of Humanities The Priority It Deserves

quoting William Damonvia New Straits Times
Tuesday, July 9, 2019

It is evident that there is a conscious or unconscious neglect of the study of humanities which is the umbrella term for the study of religion, philosophical sciences, history, literature and liberal arts among others.

In the News

After Saying He Wouldn’t, Activist Tom Steyer Launches 2020 Campaign

quoting Bill Whalenvia Las Vegas Review Journal
Tuesday, July 9, 2019

Billionaire activist Tom Steyer announced Tuesday he is running for president — just months after he said he wouldn’t run so he could dedicate “100 percent of my time, effort and resources” to his organization, Need to Impeach.

In the News

Disinformation: An ‘Existential Threat’?

quoting Herbert Linvia CNN Fareed's Global Briefing
Tuesday, July 9, 2019
That’s what Stanford’s Herbert Lin suggests in a new paper for the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. That organization has designated two threats to humanity as “existential”—nuclear war and climate change—and Lin suggests we might count “cyber-enabled information warfare” among them, too.
In the News

America’s Political System Is Rigged Against the Left (And Always Has Been)

quoting Jonathan Roddenvia Intelligencer
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

There is a majority coalition for progressive politics in the United States — but not necessarily a winning one.

In the News

Questions About U.S. Cyberattack Blowback

quoting Jamil Jaffervia Politico
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

The U.S. has plenty to lose as it steps up aggressive cyberattacks on Russia and Iran, even though its own capabilities are more fearsome.

In the News

The Court Denied Trump’s Possible To Block Critics On Twitter

quoting Jamil Jaffervia The Gal Post
Tuesday, July 9, 2019

The habit of the President of the United States Donald trump to block critics on Twitter is at odds with the First amendment to the U.S. Constitution (guaranteeing freedom of expression and access to information). To make this decision on 9 July came a Federal appeals court in new York.

In the News

The Path To Sustainability For The Liberian Education Advancement Programme

mentioning Eric Hanushekvia Front Page Africa
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

In 2016, Liberia – one of the poorest countries in the world – embarked upon the world’s most innovative Public-Private Partnership in education. Its government was determined to improve learning outcomes for children.