Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

The 11th Hour Of The 11th Day Of The 11th Month—100 Years Ago

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Thursday, November 8, 2018

The First World War ended 100 years ago this month on November 11, 1918, at 11 a.m. Nearly 20 million people had perished since the war began on July 28, 1914. In early 1918, it looked as if the Central Powers—Austria-Hungary, Germany, Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire—would win.

Featured

Peter Berkowitz On The Prevention Of Abuses Of Power

by Peter Berkowitzvia PolicyEd
Thursday, November 8, 2018

A well-designed constitution protects individual freedoms by preventing the abuse of power by the government. Each branch of government acts to check and balance the other branches of government. The real protection of our freedoms is the prevention of abuses of power through the wise structure of the legislature, the executive, and the judiciary.

Featured

“Bad Men” And The “Better Angels of Our Nature”

by Adam J. Whitevia The American Mind
Thursday, November 8, 2018

To readers of the New York Packet, Alexander Hamilton’s Publius justified the proposed Constitution’s Electoral College as guaranteeing “a moral certainty, that the office of President will never fall to the lot of any man who is not in an eminent degree endowed with the requisite qualifications.” Unlike in state elections, Publius claimed, the presidency would not fall to men with “[t]alents for low intrigue, and the little arts of popularity” and “[i]t will not be too strong to say, that there will be a constant probability of seeing the station filled by characters pre-eminent for ability and virtue.”

Featured

Area 45: Into The Wild Blue Yonder With Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson

interview with Heather Wilsonvia Area 45
Wednesday, November 7, 2018

How does the Air Force maintain and improve weapons procurement, recruitment, military air superiority, and address the changing role of pilots in 21st Century warfare?

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

The New Supreme Court And Privacy Jurisprudence

by John Yoo, James C. Phillipsvia National Review
Thursday, November 8, 2018

This week’s election results suggest that Justice Brett Kavanaugh allowed Republicans to defy a Democratic blue wave and keep the Senate. Democratic senators in North Dakota, Indiana, and Missouri who voted against his confirmation lost their reelection bids by large margins, while the sole Democrat who voted for him held on in West Virginia. But Kavanaugh’s confirmation fight will have effects far beyond the elections to the core issues that are driving division between the parties: abortion, gay marriage, and privacy.

Analysis and Commentary

Europe's Banks

by John H. Cochrane via Grumpy Economist
Thursday, November 8, 2018

My visit to Europe resulted in many interesting conversations. There was a stark contrast between the complex regulatory vision of formal presentations and papers, and the lunch and coffee discussion reflecting experience of people involved in actually regulating banks. They seemed to be quite frustrated by the state of things. Disclaimer: this is all completely unverified gossip, and remembered through a fog of jet lag. If commenters have better facts, I'm hungry to hear them.

Analysis and Commentary

Education As A Public Good In A Time Of Choice And Diversity

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, November 7, 2018

The distinguished Stanford education historian David F. Labaree recently published a perceptive, provocative essay in the Kappan that I found myself nodding in agreement with about three-quarters of the time and shaking my head the other quarter. His thesis: Over time, American K–12 education has largely replaced its commitment to advancing the public good with a more selfish focus on securing private gains of various kinds.

US Ballot Box Image
Analysis and Commentary

The Big Story Behind The 2018 Election

by Lanhee J. Chenvia Townhall
Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Americans turned out on Tuesday in big numbers to vote in a critical and hotly contested midterm election. While Democrats were able to win control of the House, the big story is that Republicans will add to their majority in the U.S. Senate.

Analysis and Commentary

Middle Eastern Christians Are Under Threat. How Do They Feel About Jews And Israel?

by Samuel Tadrosvia Mosaic Magazine
Thursday, November 8, 2018

Unlike Western Christians, Middle Eastern Christians never warmed to Jews, but the rise of Islamism has led some to see Israel as the proverbial enemy of their enemy.

Analysis and Commentary

Are Matt Yglesias's Words That Wise?

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Co-blogger Bryan Caplan quotes Matt Yglesias, claiming that his words are wise. Here’s what Bryan quotes: Trump’s accession to the presidency alarmed liberals on two levels.

Stanford Oval
Analysis and Commentary

How A Powerful Woman Limited The Number Of Stanford Women

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Thursday, November 8, 2018

After nearly a decade of dedication to coeducation at the university, Mrs. Stanford had become alarmed. Women were a minority at Stanford, but their numbers were surging. If the trend continued, she feared, the university would soon be overwhelmingly female — the “Vassar of the Pacific Coast,” as one early observer put it. “This was not my husband’s wish, nor is it mine, nor would it have been my son’s,” she told the trustees.

Interviews
Interviews

Michael Petrilli: Much About The Midterms

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Education Gadfly
Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli discusses the midterms’ effects on education policy.

In the News
In the News

Silas Palmer Fellow Researches A Forgotten Foreign Correspondent And Journalistic Ethics In The Third Reich

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Journalists write the first draft of history, so the saying goes.  Even beyond their newspaper articles and reports, the shelves of journalism history at modern university libraries are dotted with the grandiosely titled memoirs of journalists of the 20th century. 

News
In the News

Reason Is Outshouted At The Border

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia The World
Wednesday, November 7, 2018

More than 30 years ago, I began going down to the U.S.-Mexican border on a regular basis. I was a correspondent covering Latin America, and I knew, appreciated and loved the unique beauty of its undulating rivers and mountains, and of its peoples, who then seemed to have created along the now-traumatized border a kind of naturally ordered little state of their own.

In the News

Niall Ferguson Says Trump Is A Populist Not A Fascist

quoting Niall Fergusonvia History News Network
Wednesday, November 7, 2018

British historian Niall Ferguson began his talk at the Festival of Dangerous Ideas in Sydney on the weekend by explaining his theory that Mr Trump was in fact a populist and not a fascist, like many have warned.

In the News

Here’s How A Divided Congress May Show Up In U.S. Economic Data

quoting Steven J. Davisvia Bloomberg
Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Tuesday’s election results handing Democrats control of the House and maintaining Republicans’ hold on the Senate, two years after Donald Trump’s victory as president, are likely to have subtle but not insignificant effects on the U.S. economy in the months ahead.

In the News

Would Turnout Go Up If We Didn’t Have To Vote On A Workday?

quoting Michael McFaulvia The Washington Post
Tuesday, November 6, 2018

In a recent editorial, Stanford professors Adam Bonica and Michael McFaul endorsed A Day Off For Democracy — a campaign to give Americans paid time off on Election Day. Why does America vote on Tuesdays, and what other alternatives might there be? Here are seven things you should know about the timing of Election Day.

In the News

Raghuram Rajan Says RBI Is A Seat Belt For Government

featuring Raghuram Rajanvia Live Mint
Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Once you have appointed these deputy governors and governor, you have to listen to them because that is what you have appointed them for, they are your safety belt: Former RBI governor Raghuram Rajan.

In the News

Some Issues Shouldn't Be Decided Directly By Citizens

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia The Daily Sentinel
Thursday, November 8, 2018

One of the disadvantages about writing a political column on Wednesdays is that the founders had some kind of fascination with Tuesday, and insisted that it be Election Day. This means that as I write I am not sure how the various elections across this great land turned out.

In the News

Gavin Newsom’s Future Looks A Lot Brighter If Trump Wins In 2020

quoting Bill Whalenvia San Francisco Chronicle
Wednesday, November 7, 2018

The election of Gavin Newsom as California governor has pole-vaulted the former San Francisco mayor into one of the oddest political positions in the country. “As one of the nation’s leading Democrats, Newsom will be bashing Donald Trump by day but praying for Trump’s re-election in 2020 at night — because if Trump doesn’t get re-elected, Newsom’s presidential aspirations will go up in smoke,” said Bill Whalen, a Republican strategist and research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

In the News

Democrats Eye Total Supermajority + Xavier Becerra: Phone Addict?

quoting Bill Whalenvia Sacramento Bee
Monday, November 5, 2018

We’ve all been there. We’re talking to someone when our phone buzzes. We don’t want to be rude, but we’ve got to respond. Such appeared to be the case for Attorney General Xavier Becerra during a Friday news conference with Secretary of State Alex Padilla. Less than a minute in, with Padilla discussing record-high voter registration, Becerra pulled out his phone, shook his head, and began typing.

In the News

In Bipartisan Pleas, Experts Urge Trump To Save Nuclear Treaty With Russia

mentioning George P. Shultzvia The New York Times
Thursday, November 8, 2018

Alarmed at what they see as disintegrating curbs on nuclear weapons, a bipartisan array of American nonproliferation experts has urged President Trump to salvage a Cold War-era treaty with Russia that he has vowed to scrap.

In the News

Election Fallout: Where Does U.S. Health Care Go From Here?

mentioning Lanhee J. Chenvia Center for Health Journalism
Thursday, November 8, 2018

Health care topped voter concerns in the run-up to the midterm elections, beating out the economy and jobs. And voters were right to be concerned. The midterm results have enormous implications for the future of U.S. health care policy. With the Democrats winning a majority in the House of Representatives, GOP attempts to legislatively repeal the Affordable Care Act are now thwarted.