Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

How China ‘Woke’ America

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, October 3, 2019

But did she wake up just in time or too late?

Featured

The People’s Republic Of China Was Born In Chains

by Frank Diköttervia Foreign Policy
Wednesday, October 2, 2019

The Communist Party calls 1949 a liberation. But China was far freer beforehand.

Featured

The Senate Should Change Its Rules On Impeachment

by John Yoovia National Review
Wednesday, October 2, 2019

The Constitution gives the Senate flexibility on whether and how to hold an impeachment trial.

Featured

The Difference Between Impeachment Then And Now: A California Congressman Who Didn’t Rush To Judgment

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

If presidential impeachment drama is in the cards for Congress this fall, what’s California’s role?

Obviously, the conversation begins with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. It’s her responsibility to, in effect, decide which rabbit hole for Democrats to descend—whether it’s politically sager to file a single article of impeachment based strictly upon the president’s dealings with Ukraine, or to broaden the charges to include other Democratic hobbyhorses (emoluments, Stormy Daniels, etc.).

Featured

Reflections On Allan H. Meltzer’s Contributions To Monetary Economics And Public Policy

featuring Allan H. Meltzer, Michael D. Bordo, Charles I. Plosser, John B. Taylorvia Hoover Institution Press
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Allan H. Meltzer (1928–2017), a twentieth-century macroeconomist, was an innovator in the field of monetary economics and public policy, showing how central banking could influence economic disasters. Meltzer was also a valued consultant both in the United States and overseas, championing rules-based monetary policy and free markets. Eleven prominent economists reflect on his contributions in this volume edited by David Beckworth.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Advanced Coursework Gets A Needed Boost

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Last week in Austin, at the annual “summit” sponsored by the PIE (“Policy Innovators in Education”) Network, prizes were conferred on a handful of state-based education-reform groups that had accomplished remarkable feats in the previous year, this despite the reform-averse mood that chills much of the nation.

Analysis and Commentary

The King (James) And I: Newsom Sacks The NCAA, Gets Flagged For Targeting Trump

by Bill Whalenvia Forbes
Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Breaking news out of California: lawmakers have discovered a convenient nemesis other than President Trump – namely, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

Analysis and Commentary

Matt Stoller Responds

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Thursday, October 3, 2019

Recently I posted a critique of Matt Stoller’s nasty attack on the late Aaron Director. Stoller didn’t just challenge Director’s views; he suggested not too subtly that Director changed his views because he was paid to do so.

Interviews
Interviews

Harvard Law School’s Professor Jack Goldsmith On His New Book “In Hoffa’s Shadow”

interview with Jack Goldsmithvia Hugh Hewitt
Thursday, October 3, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Jack Goldsmith discusses new book In Hoffa’s Shadow.

In the News
In the News

These 526 Voters Represent All of America. And They Spent a Weekend Together.

featuring Larry Diamondvia The New York Times
Thursday, October 3, 2019

These voters — 526 total, representative of Americans who are registered to vote — were invited to spend a weekend in a resort outside Dallas to prove that there might be a better way to disagree.

In the News

How A Weekend Of Discussing Politics Shifted The Views Of These Americans

featuring Larry Diamondvia CNN
Wednesday, October 2, 2019
If you spent the weekend talking politics and policy with a roomful of people who thought differently from you, how might it change your views of American democracy? According to an experiment called America in One Room, that experience moves Americans toward a rosier view of how American democracy works.
In the News

Don’t Let Bernie’s Craziness Distract From Warren’s Radical Tax Plans

quoting John F. Coganvia Wall Street Window
Thursday, October 3, 2019

Social Security is projected to consume an ever-larger share of America’s national income, mostly thanks to an aging population. Indeed, demographic change is why the program is bankrupt, with an inflation-adjusted cash-flow deficit of more than $42 trillion.

In the News

NCAA Likely To Fight The Fair Pay To Play Act, California Schools Voice Concerns

quoting Lee Ohanianvia UCLA Daily Bruin
Wednesday, October 2, 2019

The NCAA has unilaterally ruled over college athletics for over a century. “(It) kind of operates like the mafia,” said California assembly member Sydney Kamlager-Dove. “They make rules and regulations, they tell you to ‘honor them or else,’ and everyone else has kind of decided to obey.” Not anymore. Kamlager-Dove, a co-author of Senate Bill 206, which gives California college student-athletes the right to earn revenue from their names, images and likenesses, said the bill isn’t about the money – it’s about just treatment for underserved student-athletes.

In the News

Global Uncertainty Has Surged To A Record High And It Is Killing Growth

cited Steven J. Davisvia The Telegraph
Thursday, October 3, 2019

Markets hate uncertainty. It’s a well-worn truism that is trotted out every time the pound plunges on the latest Brexit twist or stocks swoon on another Twitter tirade from Donald Trump. But one index empirically shows that businesses and investors are facing a level of uncertainty never seen before and that could be hurting the world economy.

In the News

Promising A ‘Quick Fix’ On Brexit Has Always Been A Monstrous Con

quoting Niall Fergusonvia Evening Standard
Thursday, October 3, 2019

Boris Johnson has bet the farm on one thing, and one thing alone: boredom. When James Cleverly, the Conservative Party chairman, admitted he was “quite bored of Brexit”, he certainly spoke for party members, who can’t wait to be shot of the whole process: a sundering from the European Union that they believed (because the  Vote Leave campaign told them) would be a quickie divorce but has turned out to be a frustratingly protracted and fiddly diplomatic nightmare. 

In the News

Jon Huntsman Returns To Utah After Serving Two Years As The Ambassador To Russia During A Historically Tense Time

quoting Michael McFaulvia The Salt Lake Tribune
Wednesday, October 2, 2019

After two years lodged between Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin, U.S. Ambassador to Russia Jon Huntsman is leaving his post Thursday, returning to Utah, where he is weighing a bid to again run for governor. Huntsman, who took on the role as America’s top envoy to Russia during a tumultuous time between the two world powers, said as he departs that things could have been worse if not for diplomatic efforts to stem a further slide in the relationship.

In the News

Canadian Politicians Promise To Bring More Risk To Housing: Part One, The Liberals

quoting Charles Calomirisvia Better Dwelling
Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Canadian politicians are promising everything but the kitchen sink in the 2019 Federal Election. Although, there’s still 19 days – so don’t rule out kitchen sink subsidies. Most notable to our readers is obviously their housing platforms. A wide range of readers, from fund managers to Millennial buyers, have asked for our take on specific platforms.

In the News

Hacking Back At Nations May Be Less Risky Than We Thought, Studies Show

quoting Jacquelyn Schneidervia SF Gate
Wednesday, October 2, 2019

The United States has historically been wary of punching back in cyberspace, fearing that a digital conflict could rapidly escalate to rockets and bombs. But those concerns may be overblown. A pair of recent studies has found it's extremely rare for nations to ratchet up a cyber conflict, let alone escalate it to a conventional military exchange, and that the U.S. public may put extra pressure on leaders not to let a cyber conflict get out of hand.

In the News

The Economic Consequences Of Trump’s Twitter-Happy Ways

quoting Steven J. Davisvia Live Mint
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

The president’s use of social media to fire missives has driven policy and economic uncertainty in the US to record highs.