Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

A New Era For The China-Russia-US Triangle

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Thursday, October 11, 2018

Nearly a half-century ago, President Richard Nixon’s secretary of state, Henry Kissinger, established a successful U.S. strategy for dealing with America’s two most dangerous rivals. He sought closer ties to both the Soviet Union, with its more than 7,000 nuclear weapons, and Communist China, with the world’s largest population.

Featured

On China’s Western Front

by Russell A. Bermanvia The Caravan
Thursday, October 11, 2018

Problems in China’s restive northwest province of Xinjiang have long been simmering, but recent developments point to growing troubles, as news reports and statements by international organizations have significantly raised public attention.  Beijing is engaged in programmatic efforts to suppress the ethnic identity of the Uighur people, a population of 11 million, while combatting their aspirations for political autonomy or even independence.

Featured

The Danger Of Regulatory Capture

by John B. Taylorvia PolicyEd
Thursday, October 11, 2018

Regulatory capture occurs when regulatory agencies become dominated by the very industries they were charged with regulating, prompting regulators to advance the goals and interests of those industries. While regulation is necessary and can be done well, it must always be balanced against the potential for unintended consequences that harm the consumers it is intended to protect.

Featured

H.R. McMaster Warns Of “Illusion Of Progress” In Dealing With N. Korea

featuring H. R. McMastervia Pulse News
Thursday, October 11, 2018

Sanctions have proven effective in pressuring North Korea to consider surrendering its nuclear ambition, and they should be eased only on strong evidence of denuclearization, not wishful thinking, said H. R. McMaster, the 26th White House National Security Council Advisor of the Trump administration.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

The Libertarian: What’s Wrong With Administrative Law?

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The Libertarian
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

How unaccountable bureaucracies have upended the separation of powers.

Analysis and Commentary

Goodbye, Columbus? No. But Goodbye To California Debates

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, October 11, 2018

The map tells us that California’s lowest point is Death Valley’s Badwater Basin, some 282 feet below sea level.

Analysis and Commentary

The Education Exchange: Alberto Carvalho And Miami-Dade County Schools

by Paul E. Petersonvia The Education Exchange
Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Under the leadership of Superintendent Alberto Carvalho, Miami-Dade County Public Schools has won numerous awards for student performance. Carvalho sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss his strategy of empowering school leaders and reforming teacher compensation.

Analysis and Commentary

No Eclipse

by LTC Marcus Ferraravia Analysis
Tuesday, October 9, 2018

An American crisis of confidence, augmented by effective Chinese propaganda, has driven the narrative of the end of the “American Century,” replaced with a Chinese one. An analysis of such metrics as demography, social stability, geography, the environment, economics, military strength and capability, and soft power belies the concept of American decline and shows that China is beset with substantial internal and international challenges that indicate continued United States dominance in world affairs.

Analysis and Commentary

Sharing Is Caring: The United States’ New Cyber Commitment For NATO

by Trey Herrvia Council on Foreign Relations
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

An expected Pentagon announcement suggests that the United States might use cyber capabilities alongside conventional weapons with NATO allies. That's a subtle, yet significant shift in policy.

Analysis and Commentary

Sexual Violence And Mental Health Illness Plague America’s Universities

by Alvin Rabushkavia Thoughtful Ideas
Thursday, October 11, 2018

A good way to pick up the intellectual trends in vogue at American Universities is to browse the web pages of the top 20 private national universities as ranked by U.S. News & World Report.

Interviews
Interviews

Boot-Camp Wisdom: An Interview With George P. Shultz

interview with George P. Shultzvia Mount Madonna School
Monday, October 8, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow George Shultz shares the wisdom gained over his lifetime.

Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson: Could California's Decline Spread To The Rest Of America?

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Fox News
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses many of the problems in California, including homelessness, poverty, crime, taxes, and much more.

Interviews

Race Relations, With Shelby Steele

interview with Shelby Steelevia City-Journal
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Shelby Steele discusses the state of race relations in American society, the history of black protest movements, and other subjects.

Interviews

Richard Epstein: Libel, The Media, And Constitutional Legitimacy

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The National Constitution Center
Thursday, October 11, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein explains what libel is and how laws against libel and slander fit within the First Amendment’s protections of free speech and the free press. This wide-ranging discussion also delves into how facts play a role in the law and media in a “post-truth society,” how online platforms filter news, and the legitimacy of the media and the Supreme Court in the wake of heated coverage of the Kavanaugh confirmation battle.

Interviews

Michael Auslin On The Steve Cochran Show (1:43:50)

interview with Michael R. Auslinvia WGN Radio
Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Auslin discusses the resignation of Nikki Haley as well as North Korea.

Interviews

Michael Petrilli: The State Of School Choice

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Education Gadfly
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli discusses with Halli Faulkner, national policy director at the American Federation for Children, her organization’s annual school choice guidebook.

In the News
In the News

Ambassador Michael McFaul: From Cold War To Hot Peace

featuring Michael McFaulvia Commonwealth Club
Thursday, October 11, 2018

Michael McFaul served as the seventh U.S. ambassador to Russia from 2012–2014 and is one of America’s leading scholars with unparalleled insights into the Russian Federation. He offers his thoughts on U.S.–Russia relations, election interference and President Trump’s relationship with President Putin.

In the News

Rethinking Currency: Finding A Better Way To Run An Economy

quoting John H. Cochrane via Bloomberg
Thursday, October 11, 2018

Money is just so problematic, even apart from its being the root of all evil. It can disappear suddenly: A 2-year-old boy in Utah just put $1,060 of cash through a shredder while his parents weren’t looking. It doesn’t earn its keep: Apple Inc.’s returns are being dragged down by the low yield on $244 billion in cash and marketable securities that it can’t figure out how to spend. And it can seriously malfunction, as it did in last decade’s global financial crisis.

In the News

Quote Of The Day: Shelby Steele On The Left’s Hatred

quoting Shelby Steelevia Ricochet
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Shelby Steele’s September 24 Op-ed in the Wall Street Journal is worthy of being quoted in its entirety, because every sentence is quotable. But I chose a couple of the choicest parts. Steele opines that the left’s descent into hatred started in the 1960s, when: America finally accepted that slavery and segregation were profound moral failings. That acceptance changed America forever.

In the News

When Dictators Masquerade As Democrats

quoting Larry Diamondvia Leadership Nigeria Newspaper
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Democracy literally means, “Rule By People”. Democracy is a system of government where the citizens exercise power by voting. In a direct democracy, the citizens as a whole form a governing body and vote directly on each issue. In a representative democracy the citizens elect representatives from among themselves. These representatives meet to form a governing body, such as a legislature.

In the News

Governments, Institutions Struggle To Find Battle Plan For Next Recession

quoting Martin Feldsteinvia Business Times (Singapore)
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) and other institutions are grappling with potential strategies to counter any severe economic downturn. Ahead of this week's IMF meetings in Bali, the institution's second chapter in its annual report discusses its current and possible policies.

In the News

You Like Numbers? Researchers At Two Institutions That Ranked Ohio'S Fiscal Health Provide Plenty Of Them

quoting Bill Whalenvia Crain's Cleveland Business
Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Ohio Gov. John Kasich is no longer a favorite of conservatives, but he gets a pretty good grade from the libertarian Cato Institute in its 2018 fiscal policy report card on the nation's governors.

In the News

China Should Give Taiwan More International Space: Ex-Secretary Of State Condoleezza Rice

quoting Condoleezza Ricevia Taiwan News
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

China should give Taiwan more international space, while the United States continues to have the duty to defend the island, former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said Tuesday.

Condoleezza Rice
In the News

Georgia Tech To Give Condoleezza Rice Honorary Degree At Fall Commencement

featuring Condoleezza Ricevia Atlanta Journal Constitution
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

The Georgia Board of Regents on Tuesday approved a request from Georgia Tech to give former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice an honorary degree at its fall commencement ceremony.

In the News

William Nordhaus, Paul Romer Win 2018 Economics Nobel Prize

quoting David R. Hendersonvia Competitive Enterprise Institute
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Both of this year’s economics Nobel laureates have been on the short list for some time. Both are deserving, as David Henderson writes in The Wall Street Journal. Paul Romer is best known for his work on the nature of economic growth, and William Nordhaus for his environmental economics, as well as coauthoring, with fellow laureate Paul Samuelson, the 20th century’s most widely used economics textbook (a copy of the 18th edition sits on my shelf).

In the News

AP Fact Check: Trump's Dark Portrait Of Dem Health Plans

quoting Charles Blahousvia Star Tribune (MN)
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

President Donald Trump took a big step into the debate over the future of America's health care system with an op-ed column in USA Today on Wednesday that presented a bleak vision of what would happen under plans backed by many Democrats to institute government insurance for everyone.

In the News

Debt: Challenges Ahead

mentioning John B. Taylorvia World Bank Publications
Thursday, October 11, 2018

Public debt is rising in both emerging markets and low income developing countries to levels not seen since the early 1980s. Forty percent of low income developing countries are now either in debt distress or at high risk of default. At the same time, corporate debt in emerging markets is also exceeding historical levels. This situation calls for new efforts within developing countries and the international community to contain vulnerabilities rising from these increasing levels of debt.