Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Could Trump Win 20 Percent Of The African-American Vote In 2020?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, October 18, 2018

The provocative Donald Trump certainly seems to be disliked by a majority of African-American professional athletes, cable-news hosts, academics, and the Congressional Black Caucus. Yet there are subtle but increasing indications that his approval among other African Americans may be reaching historic highs for a modern Republican president.

Featured

Jamal Khashoggi, Mohammad Bin Salman, And The Future Of U.S.-Saudi Relations

Thursday, October 18, 2018
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Jamal Khashoggi, Mohammad bin Salman, and the Future of U.S.-Saudi Relations" on Thursday, October 18, 2018 from 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM EST. 

Event
Featured

In California’s Central Valley, A Supersize Fight For A Senate Supermajority

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, October 18, 2018

To get a sense of California zeitgeist in this election, hop in a car (for now, forget about high-speed rail) and start driving due east from San Jose—away from Silicon Valley, into the Central Valley and California’s 12th State Senate District.

Featured

A Worthy Requiem For Pat Moynihan

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Tragically, the mold seems to have been irrevocably shattered, if not discarded on the ash heap of history. Surrounded by the politics and politicians that plague us today, and the wretched campus climate that we’re living with, to view the great new documentary about the late Pat Moynihan is to weep over what’s practically vanished from American public and intellectual life: independent thinkers, policymakers both intrepid and persistent, respect for data, reverence for the truth, determination to stand up for what’s best about America while acknowledging its failings, and a willingness to cross the lines of party and ideology in pursuit of better outcomes for people who need them.

Featured

World Economic Forum Confirms The US Is Great Again Under Trump

by Paul R. Gregoryvia The Hill
Thursday, October 18, 2018

The World Economic Forum’s (WEF) 2018 World Competitiveness Report ranks the United States No. 1 in global competitiveness, up from No. 3 in the past few years and its first top ranking in a decade. A high ranking matters.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Richard Nixon's 1968 Campaign For President

by David R. Henderson featuring Annelise Andersonvia EconLog
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

"The first thing that Martin did for Richard Nixon—one of the first things—it’s dated July 4, 1967—is to make the argument for abolishing the military draft and moving to an all-volunteer armed force." This is my Hoover colleague Annelise Anderson reminiscing about how she and her husband, the late Martin Anderson, got involved in Richard Nixon’s 1967-68 campaign for president of the United States.

Analysis and Commentary

Kevin Mckenna On Characters, Plot, And Themes Of In The First Circle

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Thursday, October 18, 2018

Russian Literature Professor Kevin McKenna of the University of Vermont talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the characters, plot, and themes of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's masterpiece, In the First Circle. This is the second episode of the EconTalk book club discussing the book. The first episode--a discussion of Solzhenitsyn's life and times--is available on EconTalk at Kevin McKenna on Solzhenitsyn, the Soviet Union, and In the First Circle.

Analysis and Commentary

Proposal For A Cyber-International Committee Of The Red Cross

by Elaine Korzak, Herbert Linvia Lawfare
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

This article proposes the creation of an international organization modeled after the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to provide assistance and relief to vulnerable citizens and enterprises affected by serious cyberattacks. Companies that have signed onto the Tech Accord principles would form the core of the organization, thereby filling an important gap in an increasingly volatile geopolitical environment. In this article, the term “cyber-ICRC” is intended to be suggestive of the role that such an organization might play but not to imply any kind of formal connection to the ICRC. 

Analysis and Commentary

The Argument Against Proposition 6: Don’t Jettison Road And Bridge Safety Projects

by Loren Kayevia Eureka
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

California practically invented the modern transportation system. Without our historic highway and road network, connecting farm and city, factories and ports, California would be Albania—a pretty coastline with an underperforming economy.

Interviews
Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson: Are Democrats Destroying Their Own Midterm Dreams?

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Fox News
Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses how the democrats are hurting their cause by their violent and irrational behavior.

Interviews

Martin Feldstein: Rate Hikes Will Squeeze Economy, Markets

interview with Martin Feldsteinvia Fox Business
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Martin Feldstein discusses the state of the economy and the potential impact of the Federal Reserve raising interest rates.

Interviews

Steven Davis: The Trade War Is A 'Negative' For The U.S.: Professor

interview with Steven J. Davisvia CNBC
Thursday, October 18, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Steven Davis discusses evidence of the trade war reducing the willingness of businesses to invest in the US in the short term.

Interviews

Michael Petrilli: School Choice For English Language Learners

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Education Gadfly
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli discusses the relationship between English language learners and school choice.

In the News
In the News

Students Praise Summer Institute Program

via Hoover IP2
Thursday, October 11, 2018

The 2018 cohort of the Hoover IP² Summer Institute on the Economics and Politics of Innovation overwhelming endorsed the program that ran from August 5 to August 18, 2018, at Stanford University. In a survey of participants administered at the program’s conclusion, all respondents stated that they were satisfied with the institute and they would recommend it to other students and young professionals. In the words of one participant, “the Summer Institute was one of the best experiences I’ve had in my professional and student life.”

Bank Vault
In the News

Is Your Bank Ready For The Next Crisis?

quoting John H. Cochrane via Forbes
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

The campaign for financial deregulation should have you worried. Is bank supervision tight enough to prevent another meltdown? Is it loose enough to let the economy grow? The Trump Administration will tell you that it is scoring on both counts, but you may harbor doubts.

In the News

How We Divide

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia The Epoch Times
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

How divided are we? Victor Davis Hanson wrote this about what the Kavanaugh hearings showed: “The lesson of the hearings transcends the Kavanaugh confirmation. We were presented with two radically different and now competing versions of American jurisprudence and due process, one traditional and constitutional, one fluid and revolutionary. It will be up to Americans, ultimately, to decide by which version they wish to conduct their lives.”

In the News

How Does Economics Help Us Make Better Policy? Here Are Four Examples

quoting Thomas Sowellvia Forbes
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Economics: it’s the study of human action and its unintended consequences, and I think it teaches us a lot about wise Christian stewardship and compassionate, prudent public policy. Here are four examples I recently shared with students in a colleague’s class at Samford University.

In the News

A Me-First President In A #MeToo Era

quoting David Bradyvia The American Interest
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

In less than a month, many Americans will participate in yet another critical election. I say “yet another” because we have recently experienced an unusual spate of critical midterm contests. For most of the post-World War II period, midterm elections were sleepier, less impactful events. The Democrats controlled the House of Representatives for 40 years up until 1994 and the U.S. Senate for 26 years until 1980. Since 1994, the House has flipped twice and the Senate four times. If the polls and projections are correct, the House will change hands once again.

In the News

Condivergence: Convergence Or Divergence Of The Global Economy?

quoting Michael Spencevia The Edge Markets
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Is the world converging or diverging? In 2001, Chicago historian Kenneth Pomeranz wrote about the great divergence between China and Europe in the 18th century, ending up with the West taking over global dominance. In 2011, Nobel laureate Michael Spence argued that the world was again converging in The Next Convergence: The Future of Economic Growth in a Multispeed World — with China, India and the rest catching up with the West.

In the News

A Haven Of Stability For U.S. Homeowners

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia The Villages Daily Sun
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Ten years ago, the national real estate market crashed. Except in The Villages. Sales of high-risk subprime mortgages created a foundation of sand that collapsed as marginally credit-worthy homeowners defaulted under originally cheap adjustable-rate mortgages that ballooned beyond their means and erased all disposable household income.

In the News

Why We Don’t Learn Much From (The Few) Effective Education Policies Or Programs

quoting Williamson M. Eversvia New Boston Post
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

On the face of it, it would seem reasonable to believe that education policy makers could learn much from successful policies and programs. But they often don’t. Here are two relatively clear examples of policy makers failing to learn from effective policies/programs. In both cases, the policy makers were the members of a state board of education. One is from California, the other from Massachusetts. Both sets of policies or programs were known to state policy makers at the time that the Common Core standards in mathematics and English language arts were being developed.

In the News

What California Can Teach Harvard

quoting Thomas Sowellvia Independent Institute
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

A group of Asian-Americans is suing Harvard with backing from the U.S. Department of Justice, which filed papers stating: “The record evidence demonstrates that Harvard’s race-based admissions process significantly disadvantages Asian-American applicants compared to applicants of other racial groups — including both white applicants and applicants from other racial minority groups.” This is a rare case where California policy could provide positive guidance.

In the News

Why Ignorance Prevails In Politics

quoting Thomas Sowellvia The Orange County Register
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

As Americans approach another even-year trip to the polls, those currently running and those positioning themselves for 2020 are revealing their vast ignorance in how they would “fix” what they think are our core problems. The many free lunches (or more accurately, stolen lunches) they promise, all the way up to multi-trillion dollar utopian health care boondoggles-in-waiting, show that few know enough to pass an economics principles course, much less to advance Americans’ general welfare.