Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

The Restructuring Of The World

by Michael Spencevia Project Syndicate
Thursday, September 27, 2018

Trade protectionism, together with fears over the national-security implications of technological development, are contributing to a balkanization of the world order. This is not good news for the United States as it faces an intensifying rivalry with an increasingly powerful China.

Featured

Fed Is On To A 'New Kind Of Policy,' Stanford's John Taylor Says

interview with John B. Taylorvia Bloomberg
Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow John Taylor talks about Federal Reserve policy including the raising of interest rates.

Featured

Feinstein Runs For A Fifth Term—And Runs Away From A High Note

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, September 27, 2018

To fully appreciate California Senator Dianne Feinstein’s struggles over the past couple of weeks, start with any photo of the Senate Judiciary Committee that features the trio of Feinstein, committee chair Charles Grassley, and her fellow Democrat Patrick Leahy.

Featured

The Truths Behind Our Current Political Turmoil

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, September 27, 2018

Are there any guiding principles that can make sense of the sensational news that now overwhelms the senses seemingly every hour? What is common to blaring headlines about the Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination hearings, an anti-Trump “resistance” buried deep in the permanent bureaucracy, and the improper behavior by top officials of the Obama administration, FBI, and Department of Justice?

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Kazakhstan Is Moving Away From China

by Gordon G. Changvia The Caravan
Thursday, September 27, 2018

Chinese leaders think they can imprison hundreds of thousands of Muslim citizens, attempt to eradicate their religion and culture, and maintain good relations with Central Asian countries and other Muslim-majority societies. The test of this breathtaking proposition is Kazakhstan.

Analysis and Commentary

Tech Firms Are Not Sovereigns

by Andrew Keane Woodsvia Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, September 25, 2018

It is increasingly common to hear that the sovereigns that reign over the Internet are Internet firms—the companies that set user policies and wield enormous influence over the day-to-day functioning of the Internet. The user base of these firms can be larger than many countries. They have foreign policy teams and have even engaged in experiments with user-driven self-governance. In many ways, they look like states. But firms are not sovereigns.  Some public-facing Internet firms may find it expedient to resist some states, some of the time on some issues. But this does not mean that Internet firms are a serious and lasting threat to state sovereignty. Treating them as such is a distraction from the real problem: determining how and with what limits states—sovereign nations—ought to be able to achieve their aims online.

Analysis and Commentary

The Bloodiest Battle In American History

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Military History in the News
Thursday, September 27, 2018

One hundred years ago this week doughboys of the American Expeditionary Forces went over the top in the Meuse River–Argonne Forest region of France, marking the beginning of what would become the bloodiest battle in American history. More than 1.2 million American soldiers took part in the six-week battle, part of a larger Allied effort known as the Hundred Days Offensive. By the time the battle concluded with an armistice on November 11, 1918, more than 26,000 U.S. soldiers—half of American combat fatalities in the Great War—would lie dead on the blood-soaked fields of France, with another 100,000 wounded-in-action.

Analysis and Commentary

The Case For Adding A Second 2nd Grade To High-Poverty Elementary Schools

by Michael J. Petrillivia Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Veteran education analyst Marc Tucker wrote something the other day that stopped me cold. Describing some of the highest performing education systems in the world, he said, “Students do not routinely arrive at middle school from elementary school two or even three years behind. It simply does not happen.”

Analysis and Commentary

Daily Life In The Land Of The Free

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Thursday, September 27, 2018

About a week ago, I did my 12-hour fasting so that I could go to Quest Diagnostics for a blood test. I needed the results for my regular doctor appointment early this week. I got to the place at about 7:05, 5 minutes after it opened. Ahead of me were two other patients who had lined up appointments. The guy just before me went in to the little room for his blood test and said he didn’t care whether the nurse closed the door. So it remained open and I heard the whole conversation.

Analysis and Commentary

Chinese And American Universities Have Much In Common

by Alvin Rabushkavia Thoughtful Ideas
Thursday, September 27, 2018

It is customary to hold a Convocation at the beginning of each academic year to welcome first-year students (frosh, freshers) to campus. The presidents of Chinese universities tell students to follow their interests and passions, so long as they conform with Xi Jinping Thought on Socialism with Chinese Characteristics for a New Era. The presidents of American universities also tell students to follow their interests and passions, so long as they conform with Diversity, Inclusion, Equity, and Social Justice.

Interviews
Interviews

Shelby Steele On The Laura Ingraham Show

interview with Shelby Steelevia Laura Ingraham Show
Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Shelby Steele discusses his Wall Street Journal article "Why the Left Is Consumed With Hate."

Interviews

Michael McFaul: President Trump Will Be Isolated On His Iran Position At Un Security Council (1:29)

interview with Michael McFaulvia undefined
Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Michael McFaul discusses President Trump's speech at the United Nations Security Council.

Interviews

Michael Petrilli: We Aren't Teaching Kids How To Read

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Education Gadfly
Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli discusses with Emily Hanford, a senior education correspondent and producer at APM Reports, her recent documentary on the sad state of reading instruction.

In the News
In the News

Education 20/20 Double Standards On Discipline Will Widen The Racial Divide

Thursday, September 27, 2018
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Education 20/20 Double Standards on Discipline Will Widen the Racial Divide" on Thursday, September 27, 2018 from 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM EDT.

Event
In the News

Who Might Replace Rod Rosenstein And What Would It Mean For The Mueller And SDNY Investigations?: A Deep Dive

quoting Jack Goldsmithvia Just Security
Wednesday, September 26, 2018

There’s now a widespread assumption that President Donald Trump will remove Deputy Attorney General (DAG) Rod Rosenstein, or ask for Rosenstein’s resignation, either later this week or shortly after the November 6 elections.

In the News

The Hate That Consumes

quoting Shelby Steelevia Hugh Hewitt
Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Last weekend, the WSJ carried a piece by Shelby Steele entitled “Why the Left is Consumed With Hate.” It is quite damning, but quite apropos. What else could be driving the despicable and underhanded tactics we have seen vis-a-vie the Kavanaugh hearings? We no longer politically oppose, we despise and hate our political rival. Steele frames his argument entirely in terms of race and his essential thesis is as the sub-head declares it, “Lacking worthy menaces to fight, it is driven to find a replacement for racism. Failing this, what is left?”

In the News

The Fed Will Keep Pumping Interest Rates Up Even More Than They Say

quoting David R. Hendersonvia Forbes
Wednesday, September 26, 2018

The Federal Reserve announced higher interest rates and they shared the policy-makers’ views on the likely path of interest rates through 2021. But the strength of economic growth will lead to more rate increases than the Fed currently thinks likely.

Timothy Garton Ash
In the News

Professor Timothy Garton Ash: White Eagle, Red Background: A Centenary Of Polish Independence, A Century Of Europe

mentioning Timothy Garton Ashvia Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto
Thursday, September 27, 2018

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies, University of Oxford, Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St Antony’s College, Oxford and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is the author of ten books of contemporary history and political writing is which have explored many facets of the history of Europe over the last half-century.