Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Diplomacy In A Time Of Transition

by James Goodbyvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, April 2, 2019

The long-standing state system for bringing order to the world is under pressure. The American-led security and economic commons built up over several decades in the twentieth century is at risk everywhere and in many places no longer exists. In order to prepare for the new global arrangement, America needs to return diplomatic responsibility and accountability to the Department of State. It also needs to raise the stature of the Foreign Service Institute, which trains diplomats and foreign affairs professionals. Now more than ever, America needs to maintain its strong diplomatic presence to preserve and ensure stability and peace.

Featured

Administrative Law In The Crosshairs

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas
Monday, April 1, 2019

The Supreme Court should strike down Auer v. Robbins, which grants agencies too much discretion.

Featured

How Japan Must Pity The Land Of The Setting Sun

by Niall Fergusonvia Boston Globe
Monday, April 1, 2019

Despite the bitter war they fought in the 1940s, Japan and Britain (my native country) have much in common. Both are archipelagos off the vast Eurasian landmass. Both are among the most densely populated countries in the world. Both were once mighty empires. Both are still quite rich. Both are constitutional monarchies.

Featured

New Book Examines US, Global Monetary Policy

Tuesday, April 2, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

In their new Hoover Institution Press book, Currencies, Capital, and Central Bank Balances, economists John H. Cochrane and John B. Taylor and editor Kyle Palermo address big-picture debates affecting US and global monetary policy.

News
Featured

Economic Growth

by John B. Taylor, John H. Cochrane , Michael J. Boskin, John F. Coganvia PolicyEd
Monday, July 23, 2018

America’s economy may seem stable at first glance but that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s doing well. While many believe that our economy is at its best under the circumstances, history shows a different picture.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

The Virtuous Can Never Be Guilty

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, April 2, 2019

Since ancient times, it has always been scary when moral auditors audit their own. Or as the Roman satirist Juvenal put it of male guardians entrusted to shield chaste girls from randy males, Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? (“Who will watch the watchmen?”) When humans sense that there’s neither an earthly nor divine deterrent between them and social acceptance, power, riches, or their appetites, what follows is a foregone conclusion.

Analysis and Commentary

What Joe Biden's Hands Say About His Grip On The Democratic Field

by Bill Whalenvia Forbes
Monday, April 1, 2019

I’m watching what’s transpired in the world of Joe Biden over the past 72 hours – ever since a former Democratic candidate in Nevada publicly asked: “why is the vice-president of the United States touching me?” – and two thoughts come to mind. One is: different campaign, different set of standards. The other: welcome, Mr. Vice President, to your party’s Unwelcome Wagon. Let’s start with the concept of changing standards.

Analysis and Commentary

Court Packing Madness

by David Davenportvia Townhall
Tuesday, April 2, 2019

While the rest of us enjoy basketball’s March Madness, progressives are creating madness of their own. The latest is their proposal to pack the Supreme Court by adding new seats on the Court for the next president to fill. This is clearly a political ploy to change the present 5-4 conservative makeup to a 6-5 liberal one.

Analysis and Commentary

The US Role In The Middle East In An Era Of Renewed Great Power Competition

by Eric Edelmanvia The Caravan
Tuesday, April 2, 2019

What role should the United States play in the Middle East as its attention shifts to the objectives outlined in the National Security Strategy and the National Defense Strategy of competing with near peers like Russia and China?  Today pundits and observers are posing this question against a backdrop of more than a decade and a half of costly, inconclusive and seemingly “endless” wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as the more recent deployment of roughly two thousand Special Forces troops to Syria as part of the counter ISIS campaign.  To President Trump the answer seems clear.  He noted in April 2018 at an Ohio rally “we’ll be coming out of Syria, like, very soon.

Interviews
Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson: Pushing The Limits

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Fox News
Monday, April 1, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson talks about growing up on a multi-generational farm, why he decided to write his new book, and his opinions on today's political landscape.

Interviews

Alex Stamos: Trust, Safety And Privacy In An Era Of Cyber Threats

interview with Alex Stamosvia Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR)
Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Alex Stamos discusses digital privacy at the 2019 SIEPR Economic Summit.

In the News
In the News

The Greco-Persian Wars, Part Five: The Destruction Of Athens

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia The Daily Wire
Tuesday, April 2, 2019

As Xerxes' victorious legions triumphantly marched into Attica, panic swept the countryside. An estimated quarter million women, children, and elderly fled the region in one of the largest mass migrations of the ancient world. Themistocles decreed Athens must be abandoned. The entire population of the city and its immediate surroundings, some 100,000 souls, evacuated to the rugged island of Salamis where, as historian Victor Davis Hanson writes: “They were gambling that their own seaman, along with the still unconquered Greek allies from the Peloponnese, could wreck the Persian fleet before they all starved—and before the onset of autumn.” 

In the News

Manufacturing Returns To Growth

quoting Michael Spencevia ECNS.com
Tuesday, April 2, 2019

The Caixin/Markit Manufacturing Purchasing Managers Index showed that China entered expansion territory in March, indicating a notable improvement in the country's manufacturing sector. Economists said the rise showed policies to bolster growth have begun to pay off, and the world's second-largest economy is likely to achieve steady expansion this year. The PMI, released on Monday, recovered for the second consecutive month and stood at 50.8 in March, versus 49.9 in February.

In the News

Chicago Police Union Protest Jussie Smollett Case: ‘Foxx Must Go!’

quoting John Yoovia Breitbart
Monday, April 1, 2019

The Fraternal Order of Police in Chicago is protesting outside the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office on Monday, demanding the resignation of top prosecutor Kim Foxx after her office dropped all charges against Empire actor Jussie Smollett.

In the News

Does The Macroeconomy Float In Choppy Waters?

mentioning Steven J. Davisvia Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Tuesday, April 2, 2019

In a recent Economic Synopses essay, we discussed how large changes in economic policy uncertainty (EPU) can affect key macroeconomic indicators like GDP and inflation. In that analysis, we considered only shocks that were large enough to push EPU above the recent historical highs. Thus, changes in the EPU do not necessarily have proportional changes on the economy.