Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Is The Base Enough For Democrats In 2020?

by David Brady, Brett Parkervia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Does the ideology of the Democratic nominee matter when in comes to the 2020 general election? As the first Democratic nominating contests draw closer, the debate over that crucial tactical question has begun to take form in journalistic and scholarly quarters. 

Featured

The Politics Of Institutional Reform

by Terry M. Moevia PolicyEd
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

In the New Orleans school system after Hurricane Katrina, we get the rare opportunity to observe what happens when vested interest power—which normally protects bad institutions from change—is removed from the equation, and decision makers are free to do whatever seems to work in seeking real reform.

Featured

The Worst California Law Of 2019—Eliminating Millions Of Independent Contractors

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

2019 saw much new California legislation that will depress economic opportunities and raise the state’s already high cost of living. Despite many candidate bills for worst of the year, it is easy to pick the winner (loser): Assembly Bill 5, which raises government intrusion in private labor relationships to an unprecedented and dangerous level.

Featured

A Russian Under Every Bed

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

After Trump’s election, his opponents took a sudden dislike to the Russians they once saw as peace partners.

Featured

Hoover Institution Fellow Arye Carmon Contends That Israel Needs A Constitution

Tuesday, December 17, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

In the seventy years since its founding, the state of Israel has built all the hardware of a thriving formal democracy—institutions, procedures, and elections—but has yet to fully install the software that will allow it to emerge as a substantive democracy, argued Hoover Institution Distinguished Fellow Ayre Carmon in a discussion with SF Weekly writer Jonathan Curiel at San Francisco’s Commonwealth Club.

News
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Reasonable Disagreements: The End Of The Year; The Start Of An Impeachment Trial

interview with Richard A. Epstein, Adam J. Whitevia Reasonable Disagreements
Monday, December 16, 2019

Impeachment: the House, the Senate, and the role of Chief Justice Roberts.

Analysis and Commentary

Brexit Won. Now It’s Up To Trump To Win In 2020

by Bruce Thorntonvia FrontPage Mag.com
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Then we have a chance to undo the damage done by the technocratic tyrants.

Analysis and Commentary

A Vietnam “Deal” for Afghanistan?

by Bing Westvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

In late November, President Trump announced that peace talks with the Taliban had resumed. “The Taliban wants to make a deal—we’ll see if they make a deal.” Mr. Trump said. The president has said he is tired of American soldiers acting as policemen in a remote country of scant strategic significance. Afghans are tribal, with little loyalty toward the Kabul government awash in factionalism and corruption. 

Analysis and Commentary

The Syrian Front

by Reuel Marc Gerechtvia The Caravan
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Discussing America’s stake in the Middle East has increasingly become a shell game where our “interests” can quickly disappear depending on the changing sentiments of the president. The trajectory for American foreign policy in the Middle East is clear:  down if not out.  And although Democrats can occasionally give the impression that they are in favor of a more vigorous presence, that is probably just an anti-Trumpian reflex:  if the president is in favor of abandoning the Kurds and leaving Syria, then Democrats are in favor of staying and reinforcing the alliance.  

Analysis and Commentary

Our Confused Syria Debate

by Omar Hossinovia The Caravan
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

The policy debate on Syria has unfortunately been reduced to a discussion of whether or not U.S. troops should remain in that country.  What is missing in the debate however is a fundamental reflection on why we should be in Syria at all.  Iran should be at the heart of that question.

Analysis and Commentary

California Government Pensions And Opportunity Costs

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Monday, December 16, 2019

Steven Greenhut over at the Reason blog had an excellent article last week on the really scary state of the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS). It’s titled “What, Us Worry? California Lawmakers Still Ignoring Dark Pension Clouds,” Reason, December 13.

Interviews
Interviews

Securing Tomorrow: A Conversation With Gen. James Mattis (Ret.) And David Ignatius

interview with General Jim Mattisvia Washington Post Live
Monday, December 16, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow James Mattis talks about his book Call Sign Chaos: Learning to Lead, as well as the lessons learned in securing our future.

In the News
In the News

‘The Russian Job’ Review: Feeding The Enemy

featuring Herbert Hoover, Bertrand M. Patenaudevia The Wall Street Journal
Monday, December 16, 2019

Few remember that in the early 1920s America supplied food to a starving Soviet Union, quite possibly preventing its collapse.

In the News

Everyone Knows America Lost Afghanistan Long Ago

quoting Jack Goldsmithvia Foreign Policy
Monday, December 16, 2019

Inflated threats, concealed costs, and lack of accountability for failure—and the complicity of the foreign-policy establishment—have kept the infinity war going for 18 years.

In the News

10 Leaders In Business, Politics And Arts Share Their Favorite Books Of 2019

quoting H. R. McMastervia The Wall Street Journal
Monday, December 16, 2019

Each year we ask more than 50 leaders and luminaries from literature, business, politics and the arts to name the best books they’ve read during the year. You could spend all day reading the full list—and all year reading the books.

In the News

A Witch Hunt, After All And Other Commentary

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia New York Post
Monday, December 16, 2019

Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s report on the origins of Russiagate documented “serious procedural irregularities” so egregious that the probe “clearly should have been shut down,” argues The Arizona Republic’s Robert Robb.

In the News

India, US Set For A Productive 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue: Officials

quoting Joseph Felter via Outlook India
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

The first-ever Indo-US ministerial 2+2 dialogue on American soil is expected to be a "highly qualitative and productive" meeting during which some key agreements that will augment the bilateral security ties could be signed, according to senior officials.

In the News

How To Avoid The Ghost Of The Common Core In Social-Emotional Learning’s Rollout? Emphasize Local Control And Community Connection, Experts Say

quoting Chester E. Finn Jr.via The 74 Million
Monday, December 16, 2019

Students need to be mentally and emotionally well in order to learn at full capacity. As much money and effort have been put into demonstrating that, the need to consider the “whole child” in education was never really the subject of debate.

In the News

No Matter What Happens On Thursday, The DNC’s Debates Are Already A Disaster

quoting Bill Whalenvia Inside Sources
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Call it the Rodney Dangerfield of debates: Thursday’s scheduled campaign contest in California just can’t get no respect. The Democrat’s sixth debate was supposed to be held at UCLA, but a labor dispute involving the local chapter of AFSCME — the union representing thousands of state university service workers — forced the college to cancel.

In the News

Economic Growth Will Top 3% Again Next Year, Trump Advisor Hassett Says

quoting Kevin Hassettvia Denton Daily
Sunday, December 15, 2019

U.S. economic growth will defy expectations again in 2019 thanks to a business investment boom and President ‘s trade strategy, White House economic advisor Kevin Hassett said Wednesday.

In the News

Arizona Asks U.S. Supreme Court To Overrule 'Double Jeopardy' Finding In Murder Case

quoting Clint Bolickvia Arizona Daily Star
Monday, December 16, 2019

Arizona’s attorney general wants the U.S. Supreme Court to rule prosecutors are entitled to multiple attempts to convict someone of first-degree murder even after a jury effectively finds the charge has no legal merit.

In the News

President Trump Wants To Create A National Private School Choice Program. Here‘s How It Could Work

quoting Michael J. Petrillivia Insider Financial
Monday, December 16, 2019

President Trump, in his recent address to Congress, echoed a long-running , urging lawmakers to introduce a “school choice” initiative that would allow “disadvantaged youth” to attend a “public, private, charter, magnet, religious or home school.”

In the News

Courts More Likely To Probe Trump’s Intent In Issuing Journey Ban

quoting John Yoovia Wellston Journal
Sunday, December 15, 2019

Washington state’s attorney general has promised to uncover “what truly motivated” President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration, an approach that could prompt a rare public examination of how a U.S. president makes national security decisions.

In the News

Democrats Want To Show They Can Do More Than Impeachment

quoting Jack Goldsmithvia The Atlantic
Monday, December 16, 2019

“In impeaching Trump, House Democrats are posing a question whose answer they do not want to hear,” one writer argues. Plus: What is Tucker Carlson thinking?

In the News

First-Past-The-Post Won The British Election. Here’s How Progressives Can Defeat It.

cited Jonathan Roddenvia The American Prospect
Monday, December 16, 2019

U.S. and U.K. electoral systems allow evenly spread minorities to beat majorities concentrated geographically. But there are options to counteract that.

In the News

The Top 20 Education Next Articles Of 2019

mentioning Eric Hanushek, Paul E. Peterson, Michael J. Petrilli, Caroline M. Hoxbyvia Education Next
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Our annual look back at the year’s most popular Education Next articles is itself a reader favorite. That’s so perhaps not only because of its status as a kind of “greatest hits” album, but because the list itself can offer some insights into the current state of the education policy conversation.