Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Single Payer’s Misleading Statistics

by Scott W. Atlasvia Wall Street Journal
Monday, December 17, 2018

[Subscription Required] Critics of American heath care—and advocates of single-payer insurance or other forms of socialized medicine—point to poor U.S. rankings in infant mortality and life expectancy. It turns out both are grossly flawed calculations that misleadingly make the U.S. rank low.

Featured

Our Political Theologies

by Russell A. Bermanvia The Caravan
Tuesday, December 18, 2018

It has been seventeen years since the September 11 attacks, a defining moment not only for America but for our allies as well, and the response of one of them can help understand some of the underlying cultural aspects of contemporary political debate.  When the news reports spread through Paris, the initial reaction of profound shock quickly gave way to vigorous expressions of solidarity with the United States. “We are now all Americans” Le Monde declared famously. France, itself so often scarred by terrorism from the Middle East since the Algerian War, felt threatened as well, as painful national memories reemerged. 

Featured

Only In California: Taxing Texting, And Why This Is A Really Flawed Idea

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, December 18, 2018

The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) was scheduled to vote next month on levying a new tax on cell phone texting. Yes, the state that is constantly looking to increase tax revenue thinks it has found a new tax revenue base in our increasing reliance on cell phone texting. The motivation for this proposal is that revenue from voice calls is declining as texting is becoming an increasingly important form of communication, and the CPUC wants to restore at least part of that lost revenue.

Featured

The Liberal Arts Weren’t Murdered — They Committed Suicide

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, December 18, 2018

The great culture wars on the campuses of the 1980s were largely lost by traditionalists. And the question then became not if but when the liberal arts would die off as a result. What is strange nearly 40 years later is that the apparent outrage over what was clearly foreordained is now becoming fact. What did academia expect, given its years of academic specialization and politicized indoctrination?

Featured

The Three Blind Spots Of Politics

by Russell Robertsvia Medium
Sunday, June 25, 2017

One of the shortest, simplest yet deepest books I have read on politics is The Three Languages of Politics by Arnold Kling.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Obamacare Remains An Unsettled Law, And Will Continue To Be

by David Davenportvia Washington Examiner
Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Have you noticed that some laws seem to settle the matter in question while others do not? Some expected Republican President Dwight Eisenhower to reverse Democratic President Franklin Roosevelt’s sweeping New Deal initiatives, including Social Security, but he did not. President Richard Nixon accepted his predecessor President Lyndon Johnson’s vast expansion of the welfare state with Medicare and his war on poverty.

Analysis and Commentary

Why Vladimir Putin Is A Terrible Strategist

by Michael McFaulvia The Washington Post
Monday, December 17, 2018

President Vladimir Putin has carefully crafted an image as a strong man of action — one whose will and power have single-handedly restored Russia’s status as a great power.

Chicago Skyline
Analysis and Commentary

Chicago's New Obama Burden

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas
Monday, December 17, 2018

The public trust doctrine should keep the Presidential Center out of Jackson Park.

Analysis and Commentary

The Middle Eastern Christian Dilemma

by Samuel Tadrosvia The Caravan
Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Writing in his famous book, What Went Wrong, the Middle East’s eminent historian, Bernard Lewis remarked that “according to Islamic law and tradition, there were three groups of people who did not benefit from the general Muslim principle of legal and religious equality – unbelievers, slaves, and women …. the rise of Western power and the spread of Western influence brought important changes to all three groups.” But while the drive for the emancipation of the three groups elicited fierce opposition, the reason was hardly the same. 

Analysis and Commentary

We Need A Better Definition Of ‘Refugee’

by Ayaan Hirsi Alivia The Washington Post
Tuesday, December 18, 2018

The global asylum and refugee system is no longer fit for purpose. As a beneficiary of that system, I do not make such a statement lightly. The reality is that it is outdated and can no longer cope with the challenges posed by mass violence and global migration today.

Analysis and Commentary

A Bon-Bon For Marlborough Buffs

by Giselle Donnellyvia Military History in the News
Monday, December 17, 2018

It may be stretching the limits of this feature to offer a movie review as “Military History in the News,” but, given the temper of our times, any film even slightly to do with Britain’s greatest soldier, John Churchill Duke of Marlborough, ought to be welcomed. And in fact, The Favourite has been widely acclaimed as one of the best offerings of the year. Deliciously filmed by director Yorgos Lanthimos, The Favourite tells, albeit in a gossipy way, the tale of Queen Anne’s epic feud with Sarah Churchill, the duke’s wife, the queen’s longtime “favorite,” and ruthlessly Machiavellian power behind the throne. 

Analysis and Commentary

Diversity: The Who, What, When, Where, Why, And How

by Alvin Rabushkavia Thoughtful Ideas
Tuesday, December 18, 2018

A specter is haunting America--the specter of Diversity. Diversity has become the most important movement of our time, infusing evert aspect of social, educational, economic, and political life.

Analysis and Commentary

Ain't A Dime's Worth Of Difference?

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Monday, December 17, 2018

There ain’t a dime’s worth of difference between the Republicans and the Democrats. This quote is attributed to the late George C. Wallace, governor of Alabama in the 1960s and again in the 1980s, and frequent candidate for President of the United States.

Interviews
Victor Davis Hanson: The Postwar Order’s Decline
Interviews

'He's Become A Comic Figure': Victor Davis Hanson On Comey Denying Blame, Ripping Fox

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Fox News
Monday, December 17, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses James Comey and his behavior as Director of the FBI.

Interviews

John Yoo: Obamacare Ruling Under Fire From Democrats And Republicans

interview with John Yoovia Fox News
Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow John Yoo discusses the recent Obamacare ruling by a US District Judge.

In the News
In the News

Book Review: ‘Political Risk: How Businesses And Organizations Can Anticipate Global Insecurity’ By Condoleezza Rice And Amy Zegart

featuring Condoleezza Rice, Amy Zegartvia Financial Express
Sunday, December 16, 2018
When companies plan for the future they look at various potential downsides, which include market, operational and credit risk. They could also look at the regulatory side, where any structural change can take place that can disrupt the apple cart. But does one ever look at political risk, which has grown in importance in recent times? This is where Condoleezza Rice and Amy Zegart add value in their book titled Political Risk.
In the News

An Antidote To Idiocy In ‘Churchill’

featuring Andrew Robertsvia The New York Times
Friday, December 14, 2018
In this season of giving, get (and give) Andrew Roberts’s brilliant new biography.
In the News

A 50-Cent Trick To Help Save The American Dream

quoting Caroline M. Hoxbyvia The Washington Post
Monday, December 17, 2018
The American Dream is in such bad shape that it’s even been losing what should be one of its easier battles in the war against our new Gilded Age: getting poor kids with good grades into the right schools.
In the News

Transfer Of Excess Reserve May Pull Down Credit Rating Of RBI: Raghuram Rajan

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia The Economic Times
Monday, December 17, 2018

Former RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan has cautioned that transfer of excess reserve to the government may bring down rating of the central bank.

USS Bataan (LHD-5), a Wasp-class amphibious assault ship.
In the News

Chinese Deal May Change US Navy Ops At Israel’s Port In Haifa

quoting Admiral Gary Rougheadvia World Tribune
Monday, December 17, 2018
A Chinese company with close ties to the communist government will assume control of the civilian port in Israel’s largest port city in 2021.
In the News

Stocks Swing Lower | Google Invests In NYC | Malaysia Charges Goldman Sachs

quoting Kevin Warshvia CNBC
Monday, December 17, 2018
U.S. stock futures were both positive and negative as the recent volatility on Wall Street continues. Friday's 2-percent declines in the Dow, S&P 500, and Nasdaq turned all three measures negative for the week, and sent the Dow and S&P 500 back to May and April lows, respectively. (CNBC)
In the News

ConocoPhillips Backs Carbon Tax Plan

mentioning George P. Shultzvia The Hill
Monday, December 17, 2018
Oil and natural gas giant ConocoPhillips Co. is backing an effort to impose a tax on carbon dioxide emissions.
In the News

The Education Essays That Sparked Debate This Year: Our 19 Most Shared Columns And Commentaries From 2018

mentioning Michael J. Petrillivia The 74 Million
Monday, December 17, 2018
Here at The 74, we love a good debate. Just about every day, we publish an array of essays that take critical looks at, or offer innovative approaches to, schools, standards, practice, and policy. They’re often our most shared, circulated, and debated links of the week. We went back through the archive to look at which essayists stirred up the most discussion across 2018; here are the nine top standouts of the year, along with the following 10 runners-up.