Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Elizabeth Warren’s Unconstitutional Wealth Grab

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas
Monday, February 4, 2019

A tax can be so confiscatory that it counts as a taking of private property.

Featured

The One Topic That Won't Be Discussed At The State Of The Union

by Daniel Heilvia Budget Matters, America Off Balance
Monday, February 4, 2019

President Trump is set to deliver his second State of the Union Address. Pundits are already guessing what will happen. Will the hour-long speech focus entirely on the nation’s southern border? Will the president extend an olive branch to the new Congress? How many audience members will fall asleep?

Featured

How To Improve California’s Education, Housing Affordability

by Lee Ohanian, John B. Taylor mentioning Eric Hanushek, Hoover Institutionvia San Francisco Chronicle
Monday, February 4, 2019

Gov. Gavin Newsom’s first budget comes when California is the most challenging state in the country for low- and middle-income households: California has the highest poverty rate of any of the 50 states. California also ranks 49th in both housing affordability and cost of living. It ranks 50th in homelessness, 40th in the overall tax burden and 42nd in how well it is educating its kindergarten through high school-age young people.

Featured

America’s Misbegotten Cyber Strategy

by Amy Zegartvia The Atlantic
Saturday, February 2, 2019

The Trump administration’s National Cyber Strategy rests on a pair of convenient fictions.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Remodeling America

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, February 5, 2019

The Jacobins of today take up the tools of France’s 18th-century radicals.

Analysis and Commentary

California’s Governor Should Declare War On Regulations —Not Cities—For State’s Housing Crisis

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Last month, newly elected California governor Gavin Newsom advised the state attorney general to file a lawsuit against the city of Huntington Beach, a California community that is about 35 miles south of Los Angeles and home to about 200,000 residents. Huntington Beach was once a sleepy beach community made famous in the 1960s by the Beach Boys for its remarkable surfing locations, but the city is now being sued by Newsom for not building enough housing. 

Analysis and Commentary

Does Trump Need A State Of The Union To State His Case?

by Bill Whalenvia Forbes
Monday, February 4, 2019

At 9 p.m. sharp on the East Coast Tuesday night, tens of millions of Americans will take part in an annual political ritual: the presidential State of the Union Address.

Analysis and Commentary

Shift Job Paradigm Without Fail

by Chirantan Chatterjee mentioning Amit Seru via DNA India
Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Recent reports suggest that the Government of India may have withheld data of latest unemployment figures, post the 2016 Indian demonetisation.

Analysis and Commentary

Greg Mankiw Responds

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Last week, I challenged Harvard economics professor Greg Mankiw’s interpretation of Mr. Potter in the classic movie It’s a Wonderful Life. Greg has responded by email and given me permission to quote it. (By the way, he was a junior economist when I was a senior economist with President Reagan’s Council of Economic Advisers and, although we see each other rarely, get along well. He’s a genuinely good guy and so none of my criticism reflects any animus towards him.)

Analysis and Commentary

Ask What Changed

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Monday, February 4, 2019

When you try to understand change, whether in economics or in the rest of life, one good rule is to ask what other factor or factors changed. To explain a change in one variable, we have to point to another variable that changed, not to one that stayed the same.

Interviews
Interviews

Larry Diamond: How Chinese Sharp Power Takes Aim At American Democracy

interview with Larry Diamondvia War on the Rocks
Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Larry Diamond breaks down Beijing’s efforts to direct “sharp power” against democratic institutions in the United States. The key battleground appears to be American educational institutions and China’s main instrument is its United Front Work Department, a critical part of the Communist Party apparatus that aims to enlist, coerce, and induce support for the party around the world.

Interviews

Terry Anderson On The John Batchelor Show (Part 1)

interview with Terry Andersonvia The John Batchelor Show
Monday, February 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Terry Anderson discusses his Defining Ideas article "Restoring Tribal Economies."

Interviews

Terry Anderson On The John Batchelor Show (Part 2)

interview with Terry Andersonvia The John Batchelor Show
Monday, February 4, 2019

 Hoover Institution fellow Terry Anderson discusses his Defining Ideas article "Restoring Tribal Economies."

Interviews

Richard Epstein On The John Batchelor Show (Part 1)

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Monday, February 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses his Defining Ideas article "Farewell To Title IX’s Kangaroo Courts."

Interviews

Richard Epstein On The John Batchelor Show (Part 2)

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Monday, February 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses his Defining Ideas article "Farewell To Title IX’s Kangaroo Courts."

Interviews

Shelby Steele On The Laura Ingraham Show (59:18)

interview with Shelby Steelevia The Laura Ingraham Show
Thursday, January 31, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Shelby Steele dissects the left's obsession with faux-racism.

In the News
In the News

The Unquiet American

featuring Michael McFaulvia The American Interest
Monday, February 4, 2019

Michael McFaul’s memoir throws into sharp relief the failures of America’s Russia policy.

In the News

Global Uncertainty Gauge Enters 2019 At Record High Level

quoting Steven J. Davisvia Bloomberg
Monday, February 4, 2019

Chatter surrounding the 2020 presidential election, the government shutdown and tax policies are making Americans nervous. And the rest of the world feels uneasy too.

Stanford Oval
In the News

Colleges And Income Mobility: Undermatched, Overmatched And More

quoting Caroline M. Hoxbyvia Forbes
Monday, February 4, 2019

A potential academic contretemps between some giants in the economics profession has emerged relating to the issue of the role that colleges play in promoting intergenerational income mobility --the ability of lower-income Americans to use education as a means of achieving prosperity and sharing in the American Dream. One remarkable thing about this dispute is that it is led largely by women and nonwhite males, not the white males who dominate most of modern economics.

In the News

Today’s Threats To Global Democracy Are Coming From Democracies Themselves

quoting Larry Diamondvia Slate
Monday, February 4, 2019

When it comes to the threats to global democracy, the call is coming from inside the house. U.S.-based NGO Freedom House’s annual Freedom in the World report, released Monday, found that for the 13th straight year, global freedom has declined. (The report scores countries on 25 indicators—factors like rule of law and freedom of the press—and categorizes them as “free,” “partly free,” or “not free.”) 

In the News

State Of The Union: Trump To Call For Unity As He Tries To Reboot Presidency

quoting Bill Whalenvia The Guardian
Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Trump will tout economic strength and border security as he faces an audience with an unprecedented number of women.

In the News

Cyberattack Fears On The Rise After Shutdown, Intel Testimony

quoting Jamil Jaffervia The Hill
Friday, February 1, 2019

Lawmakers fear that increased threats from foreign actors, combined with lingering effects from the government shutdown, are making the U.S. more susceptible to cyberattacks.

In the News

Josh Harder ’08 Represents Central Valley In New Congress

mentioning Stephen Habervia Stanford Daily
Monday, February 4, 2019

Representing his home district in the Central Valley just over 30 miles east of campus, Josh Harder ’08 began his first term in Congress in January. His platform of Medicare for All and economic development for Central Valley helped the Stanford alum and former Silicon Valley venture capitalist edge out four-term incumbent Republican Jeff Denham in one of the tightest congressional races of the 2018 elections.