Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Iran Can Use Cyberattacks Against The U.S. That’s Not Nearly As Bad As It Sounds.

by Jacquelyn Schneidervia The Washington Post
Monday, January 6, 2020

Cyberwarfare can do little short-term damage, although it can have insidious long-term consequences.

Featured

The Soleimani Strike: The President Has The Constitution And Precedent On His Side

by John Yoovia National Review
Monday, January 6, 2020

It’s legal to kill an enemy in combat, and Soleimani was clearly escalating his attacks on U.S. forces.

Featured

Why Did The U.S. Kill Suleimani?

by Elizabeth Cobbs, Kimberly C. Fieldvia The New York Times
Tuesday, January 7, 2020

The attack illustrates America’s lack of a clear grand strategy — and why we need one immediately.

Featured

Boris And Britain After Brexit

featuring Andrew Robertsvia The Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, December 31, 2019

[Subscription required] British historian Andrew Roberts is known for his rigorous yet lyrical biographies of Napoleon and Churchill, along with sweeping histories of World War II and the English-speaking peoples. Then there was his failed attempt at fiction. 

Featured

The Unseen Consequences Of Occupational Licensing

by David R. Hendersonvia PolicyEd
Thursday, January 2, 2020

While occupational licensing is supposed to protect consumers, it ends up preventing new competition in the workforce.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

California Wrecks Its Gig-Economy

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas
Monday, January 6, 2020

Assembly Bill 5 violates the rights of workers and employers.

Analysis and Commentary

The Steele Dossier Bacillus

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Those who trafficked in the dossier’s concocted mess were infected, and their reputations are now declining.

Federal Reserve
Analysis and Commentary

Dudley On Reserves

by John H. Cochranevia Grumpy Economist
Monday, January 6, 2020

Bill Dudley, ex President of the New York Fed, has an excellent Bloomberg editorial on reserves. Reserves are accounts that banks hold at the Fed. The Fed used to pay no interest on these accounts. Accordingly, banks held very small quantities, as little as $10 billion in all, and they managed that quantity very carefully against legal reserve requirements, and having just enough around to make payments.

Analysis and Commentary

In Our 21st Century World, It’s Time To Invest In 21st Century Teaching Materials — & Train Educators To Use Them

by Christopher N. Ruszkowskivia The 74 Million
Monday, January 6, 2020

When I started teaching 17 years ago, the world was a different place moving at a different pace. People still rented their movies at Blockbuster Video, phones weren’t quite as smart and we called for a yellow taxi if we needed a lift. Everything was a little slower — including the sharing of content, ideas and data.

Interviews
Interviews

Niall Ferguson: Margaret Thatcher: The Woman Who Saved Great Britain

interview with Niall Fergusonvia Prager U
Monday, January 6, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Niall Ferguson discusses British Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher, and explains how the Iron Lady earned her status as one of the most important and influential women of the 20th century.

Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson On The Examining Politics Podcast

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Examining Politics Podcast
Monday, January 6, 2020

(13:03) Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses his National Review article "Iranian Analytics."

Interviews

Kiron Skinner On Fallout From US Drone Strike That Killed Iranian Gen. Soleimani

interview with Kiron K. Skinnervia Fox News
Monday, January 6, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Kiron Skinner discusses where we stand after the US drone strike that killed Iranian Gen. Soleimani as well as how to use dilpomacy to get our allies more involved.

Interviews

Paul Peterson: “Parents . . . Shifted Their Definition Of Success”

interview with Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Paul Peterson interviews Diane Tavenner, cofounder and chief education officer of Summit Schools, and the author of Prepared: What Kids Need for a Fulfilled Life.

In the News
In the News

Andrew Roberts’s Leadership In War: An Antidote To Cynicism

featuring Andrew Robertsvia National Review
Monday, January 6, 2020

A slim volume from the master historian and biographer distills lessons from the lives of nine figures who made history.

In the News

Iran’s The One In The Corner

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia New York Post
Monday, January 6, 2020

“For all the current furor over the death of Qassem Soleimani, it is Iran, not the US and the Trump administration, that is in a dilemma,” argues National Review’s Victor Davis Hanson.

In the News

Brace For The Unintended Consequences Of Killing Soleimani

quoting Niall Fergusonvia Bloomberg
Monday, January 6, 2020

A feel-good moment will complicate U.S. strategy from Israel to Africa to Latin America.

In the News

US Airstrike In Iraq: International Law, Self Defence And The Problem Of Conjecture

quoting Niall Fergusonvia Daily Maverick
Tuesday, January 7, 2020

The decision to kill a top Iranian general has been justified as self-defence against imminent threats by Iran. But the United States only has to look at its recent history in Iraq to understand the perils of unilateral action in the name of anticipatory self-defence unauthorised by the UN.

In the News

2019's Rearview Awards II

mentioning Victor Davis Hanson, Herbert Lin, Amy Zegartvia The Standard-Journal
Monday, January 6, 2020

Gauge of the year: Life expectancy in the U.S. dropped for the third straight year. The last time that happened was over a century ago, when we were in the middle of World War I and the worst flu pandemic in recorded history.