Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Secretary Of State Pompeo Addresses Stanford University’s Hoover Institution Following Strike On Iran’s Military Leader

Monday, January 13, 2020

US secretary of state Michael Pompeo delivered an address to an audience of Stanford University students, faculty, and Hoover Institution fellows about the Trump administration’s re-establishment of deterrence in its policy toward Iran, and how it correlates to America’s overarching national security strategy.

News
Featured

A Perverse Way To “Solve” California’s Housing Crisis: People Are Leaving The Golden State

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Almost everywhere you look, you will see somebody talking, writing, or complaining about California’s housing crisis. Choosing to live in San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, or Silicon Valley will cost you about $1,000,000 if you buy, and about $3,000–$5,000 or more a month if you rent. And that is if you are willing to live in something you would not want to post on Instagram.

Featured

Protecting Trade

by Raghuram Rajanvia Project Syndicate
Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Manufacturing jobs have been moving from advanced to emerging economies for decades, but only recently has the challenge posed by emerging economies fueled a broader political response. Elites who long ignored the problem are finally feeling the competitive pressure themselves, and have responded in the most cynical way possible.

Featured

The Race For Big Ideas Is On

by Amy Zegart quoting Herbert Linvia The Atlantic
Monday, January 13, 2020

The United States faces genuinely new global challenges—but tries to understand them using outmoded theories from a bygone era.

Featured

The Crucible Of Citizenship

Tuesday, January 14, 2020
Hauck Auditorium, Stanford University

America was a multiracial, multilanguage, multireligion mixing bowl even before it was the United States. Debates over immigration and citizenship have been part of the American landscape from the start. Citizenship and its most important component— voting rights—have been the most frequent topic of constitutional amendments over the years. Panelists will discuss what it means to be a citizen and what it means to be an American.

Event
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

The NEPA Stranglehold

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas
Monday, January 13, 2020

Trump’s effort to streamline the review process does not go far enough.

Analysis and Commentary

The New Post-Trump Constitution

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, January 14, 2020

The new normal: Impeachment as a routine partisan tool, endless investigations, lying under oath with impunity, surveillance of political enemies, zero accountability…

Analysis and Commentary

Roiling The Waters: Changing Alignments, New Threats, And American Withdrawal Symptoms In The Contemporary Mediterranean

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Friday, January 10, 2020

The Mediterranean is destiny, the cradle of our civilization. Think Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Persia, then Jerusalem, Athens, and Rome. What the Romans called “Mare Nostrum”—our sea—joined three continents. It was the highway of trade and culture, conquest and war. The basin was practically the world then, and a constant object of desire. This is where civilizations clashed and empires rose and fell for millennia.

Analysis and Commentary

The Wrong Side Of The Pillars Of Hercules: The Mediterranean Just Doesn’t Matter Much Anymore

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Friday, December 27, 2019

The United States is an Atlantic and Pacific power by virtue of geography, strategic necessity, and economic opportunity. A forward defense of the far littorals—Europe and the East-Asian barrier states facing China—is the essential requirement for our security. All else is not only secondary or tertiary, but often an ill-advised and grossly costly drain on our resources.

Nobel Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman
Analysis and Commentary

Landsburg's Book On Milton Friedman

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Monday, January 13, 2020

I enjoyed reading Steven Landsburg’s The Essential Milton Friedman, which was recently published by the Fraser Institute. It’s a short quick exposition of Friedman’s work and views by a master expositor.

Analysis and Commentary

Zingers From Ronald Coase

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Tuesday, January 14, 2020

When I was an intern with President Nixon’s Council of Economic Advisers in the summer of 1973, the Law of the Sea was a hot issue and my immediate boss, Robert Tollison, took me to a number of interagency meetings. At one such meeting I received a copy of a piece (I think unpublished) by Ronald H. Coase. It was done for the Department of the Treasury under Purchase Order No. 268-73. 

Interviews
Interviews

Soleimani Strike Puts Focus Back On Iran Nuclear Deal

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Yahoo News
Monday, January 13, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses the Iran Nuclear Deal as well as the death of Iranian Major General Qasem Soleimani.

In the News
In the News

Japan's Top Diplomat Meets With Former U.S. Secretary Of State George Shultz

featuring George P. Shultzvia The Japan Times
Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi met Monday with George Shultz, former U.S. secretary of state under President Ronald Reagan, ahead of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the revised Japan-U.S. security treaty.

In the News

Nations With Allies Thrive, Those Without, Wither

quoting General Jim Mattisvia Antelope Valley Press
Monday, January 13, 2020

Retired Marine Corps Gen. Jim Mattis, the former secretary of defense and an exceptionally well-read warrior, has said, “Throughout history, we see nations with allies thrive, and nations without allies wither.”