Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Victor Davis Hanson’s New Book: “The Case For Trump”

Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

In his new book, The Case for Trump, Hoover scholar Victor Davis Hanson tells the story of how Donald Trump’s first two years as president have become one of the most successful early presidential tenures in history, and argues why America needs his agendas now more than ever.

News
Featured

The Green New Deal Is A Pipe Dream, Not A Serious Policy Proposal

by Lee Ohanianvia The Hill
Friday, March 1, 2019

The Green New Deal (GND), which is being spearheaded by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.), is a long list of proposed environmental regulations and goals, combined with several social policies that would redistribute income.

Featured

The Battle For American Minds

by Amy Zegartvia The Atlantic
Monday, March 4, 2019

Russia’s 2016 election interference was only the beginning. New tactics and deep fakes are probably coming soon.

Featured

What's Behind The Disturbing Reemergence Of Anti-Semitism?

by Russell A. Bermanvia The Hill
Monday, March 4, 2019

Anti-Semitism is undergoing a worrisome resurgence. The shootings at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh last October is part of a broader pattern: the anti-Jewish slogans at the Charlottesville demonstration in 2017; violent attacks on Jewish institutions in Belgium and France; attempts to storm two synagogues in Paris during an anti-Israel riot; assaults on Jewish men wearing the traditional kippa in the streets of Berlin.

Featured

Area 45: The 2020 Presidential Field With David Brady And Doug Rivers

interview with David Brady, Douglas Riversvia Area 45
Monday, March 4, 2019

Off to the races for 2020.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Economics 101 In Labor And Housing Markets

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas
Monday, March 4, 2019

The law of supply and demand explains why jobs are plentiful while housing is scarce. 

Analysis and Commentary

Trump’s Future On The Menu

by Niall Fergusonvia Boston Globe
Monday, March 4, 2019

In the entrance to the US Senate Members’ Dining Room, there’s an old menu from March 24, 1941. On the back, presumably to record a bet, seven senators wrote the dates when they thought their country would enter World War II. Theodore G. Bilbo, a Democrat from Mississippi, thought “never.” So did D. Worth Clark, one of the two senators from Idaho. Millard Tydings of Maryland guessed either July 14, 1941 “or 1961.” A fourth senator thought Sept. 17, 1945.

Analysis and Commentary

The Forgotten Foot Soldiers Of The ‘Resistance’

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, March 5, 2019

We are still trying to fathom the apparent but transient palace-coup attempts of Rod Rosenstein and Andrew McCabe. No one has gotten to the bottom of the serial lying by McCabe and James Comey, much less their systematic and illegal leaking to pet reporters.

Analysis and Commentary

Why Do Progressives Reject Policies That Would Achieve Their Aims?

by Bruce Thorntonvia FrontPage Mag.com
Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-Sesame Street) has delivered yet another statement that bespeaks the progressives’ chronic myopia. This time she’s pondering the dilemma about whether or not it’s “still okay to have children,” given the apocalyptic future being created by climate change. The point has nothing to do with demography, as birth-rates in the U.S. are already starting to decline.

Analysis and Commentary

These Women Were Denied Veteran Status For Decades. Congress Can’t Overlook Them Again.

by Elizabeth Cobbsvia The Washington Post
Monday, March 4, 2019

Women were among the last U.S. soldiers to return home from World War I. They will also be among the last honored if an overdue but welcome bipartisan bill pending in the Senate passes.

Analysis and Commentary

Anonymous Strikes — Again And Again

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, March 5, 2019

The premise of efforts to undermine Trump is that the establishment has such power, prestige, and authority to overturn the verdict of the 2016 election.

Analysis and Commentary

Davis On Saez And Zucman

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Monday, March 4, 2019

We can only hope that in their forthcoming book on tax justice, Saez and Zucman will say the things they didn’t say in their op-ed. We can hope that they’ll help us with two empirical questions. First, what was really happening in the era of high rates? Second, why don’t they think we should worry about how taxes will affect growth? Furthermore, we can hope that they will explain their underlying philosophical position—what do they mean by “justice,” and why do they think we should share their views?

Interviews
Interviews

Historian Victor Davis Hanson Makes 'The Case For Trump' In New Book

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Fox News
Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson explains how President Trump won in 2016, and how he continues to win against the media and DC establishment.

Interviews

Lanhee Chen On AirTalk

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia KPCC 89.3 (Southern California)
Monday, March 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Lanhee Chen joins a round table to discuss Michael Cohen, President Trump's national emergency, CPAC, and much more.

In the News
In the News

China Is The 'Absolute Winner' In AI Today

quoting Niall Fergusonvia Financial Review
Tuesday, March 5, 2019

The founder and chief executive of Everledger, Leanne Kemp, has a unique view on the emerging conflict between the United States and China over technological supremacy - in which China could have the upper hand.

In the News

New Hoover Press Book Reveals Boris Pasternak Saga

Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

In the new Hoover Institution Press book, Moscow Has Ears Everywhere: New Investigations on Pasternak and Ivinskayaauthor Paolo Mancosu provides the first examination of what happened after the Nobel Prize was awarded to Boris Pasternak in 1958 for his book, Doctor Zhivago.

News
In the News

The Case For Trump

featuring Victor Davis Hansonvia New York Journal Of Books
Tuesday, March 5, 2019

President Donald Trump is controversial and polarizing. This is not a profound assertion. That President Trump is a “tragic hero” might be. In Victor Davis Hanson’s telling, President Trump maybe something akin to Sophocles’s Ajax or Pike Bishop in The Wild Bunch: “The tragic hero’s change of fortune . . . is due to an innate flaw (hamartia). . . . Nonetheless, in at least some cases, this intrinsic and usually uncivilized trait can be of service to the community, albeit usually expressed fully only at the expense of the hero’s own fortune.” 

In the News

US-China Cold War Far From Over

featuring Niall Fergusonvia Financial Review
Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Sometimes it takes a person of the world to make Australia's position so starkly clear. So it was that on the opening morning of The Australian Financial Review's Business Summit, economic historian Niall Ferguson – with his Scottish accent, Irish first name, United States passport and proudly Australian boots – explained the long-term choice facing Australia and its politicians.

In the News

Inequality Does Not Mean Inequity

quoting Thomas Sowellvia The Standard
Tuesday, March 5, 2019

The world is full of inequalities. I dare say I cannot think of a single human endeavor that has ever been equal by any important measurement. Yet, we are told by politicians and school administrators that inequality is bad and something to be fought. But is this really logical? And what kind of equality is important? Before I answer these questions, let me elaborate on what those who strive for equality of outcome want.

In the News

Security Should Come First In Choices Over China: Costelloa

quoting Niall Fergusonvia The Canberra Times
Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Future Fund chairman Peter Costello said security concerns should ultimately outweigh economic issues in Australia's relationship with China, if the nation were ever forced to choose between the two. With China's role attracting growing scrutiny from security agencies in recent years, Mr Costello said there had been a broad shift in how China was viewed since he was federal treasurer, between 1996 and 2007.

In the News

‘Medicare for All’: The Impossible Dream

quoting Charles Blahousvia The New York Times
Monday, March 4, 2019

The Brits and Canadians I know certainly love their single-payer health care systems. If one of their politicians suggested they should switch to the American health care model, they’d throw him out the window.

In the News

The $1 Trillion Storm: How A Single Hurricane Could Rupture The World Economy

quoting Alice Hillvia Vice
Saturday, March 2, 2019

Climate change and a potentially vulnerable insurance market could cause a disaster that starts in South Florida but spreads over the entire globe.

In the News

History Suggests The Fed Shouldn't Have Paused Rate Hikes

quoting Niall Fergusonvia Financial Review
Tuesday, March 5, 2019

What the hell is going on at the Fed? In December chairman Jay Powell raised rates for the fourth time, and seemed determined to keep lifting rates come hell or high water. The calamitous final few months in markets in 2018 was to a large degree down to investors finally getting to the grips with the fact that the Fed was not about to ride in and save them.

In the News

Trump-Hate Leads Progressives To Back Dictators And Other Commentary

mentioning Victor Davis Hansonvia New York Post
Monday, March 4, 2019

President Trump’s critics are right to be skeptical of his policies in Venezuela, given his “utter indifference” to the suffering under similar regimes in Russia, China, Turkey and Saudi Arabia, argues The Washington Post’s Max Boot. But “the proper response to Trump’s hypocrisy is not to castigate him for opposing the strongman in Caracas but to urge him to do more to oppose other despots.” Yet “some on the far left seem to hate Trump more” than they do Nicolás Maduro. 

In the News

Who Will Be Trump's Next Regs Czar? Here Are 4 Contenders

quoting Adam J. Whitevia Greenwire
Tuesday, March 5, 2019

The agency leading the Trump administration's deregulation agenda could soon be on the search for a new administrator. The current head of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Neomi Rao, may soon be confirmed to replace Justice Brett Kavanaugh on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.