Hoover Daily Report
Featured
General Jim Mattis bio photo
Featured

Former Secretary Of Defense, General Jim Mattis, US Marine Corps (Ret.), Returns To The Hoover Institution At Stanford University

Tuesday, March 19, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Hoover Institution at Stanford University is pleased to announce the appointment of Secretary Jim Mattis, US Marine Corps (Ret.), as the Davies Family Distinguished Fellow effective May 1, 2019. Mattis returns to Hoover after having served with distinction as the nation’s 26th Secretary of Defense in the current administration.

Press Releases
Featured

The Risky Business Of Public Pensions

by Joshua D. Rauhvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

State and local governments all around the country have failed to set aside enough money to pay for the pensions they have promised to workers in the public sector. They’re also making unrealistic assumptions about their future investment returns, further risking their budgets and the ability to pay for promised pension benefits. Confronting the true cost of future pension payments would force state and local governments to save more now and prevent budget problems in the future.

Featured

A Return To Economic Liberty

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas
Monday, March 18, 2019

Lochner should not be likened to decisions that validated slavery, segregation, and internment. 

Featured

College In Light Of The Bribery Scandal: The Economics Of Admission To An “Elite College”

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Last week, the world of colleges was rocked by a scandal in which some students were alleged to have gained admission to universities including Yale, Wake Forest, and Georgetown, as well as the California campuses of Stanford, USC, and UCLA through $25 million in bribes. This occurred through a complex process that often involved admitting students through athletic channels, in which admissions criteria may be considerably different.

Featured

The Caravan: Toward a Middle East Strategy

via The Caravan
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Issue 1921 of The Caravan is now available online. The journal is a periodic symposium on the contemporary dilemmas of the Greater Middle East.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Monopoly In History

by John H. Cochrane via Grumpy Economist
Monday, March 18, 2019

Timothy Taylor, the Conversable Economist, tracks down the oft-told story of William Lee and his knitting machine.

Analysis and Commentary

Ivy-League Schools Wither

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Higher-ed institutions have long ignored merit and squelched freedom, all while failing to educate.

Analysis and Commentary

Americans Don’t Believe In Meritocracy — They Believe In Fake-It-Ocracy

by Niall Fergusonvia Boston Globe
Monday, March 18, 2019

Americans believe in meritocracy in principle. Polls show that significant majorities — between 67 percent and 70 percent since Gallup began asking the question in 2003 — believe that, when it comes to university admissions, “applicants should be admitted solely on the basis of merit.”

Analysis and Commentary

The Collapsing Strategic Context

by Charles Hillvia The Caravan
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

In designing an optimal American strategy toward the Middle East, two factors stand out.  One is that now, as most always in the past, the climate of opinion is both “this is the last chance for peace” and “this is a time when nothing can be done”.  The second is that whatever happens in the region at this point in the 21st century will affect and be affected by negative and dangerous new trends in the other power centers of the world: China, Russia, the U.S., and even the European Union.

Analysis and Commentary

Emmanuel Macron: The Man Who Would Be King Of Europe

by Josef Joffevia The American Interest
Monday, March 18, 2019

Emmanuel Macron and Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer represent two competing visions for Europe: one top-down and protectionist, the other diffuse and decentralized.

Partial map of the Internet based on the January 15, 2005 data found on opte.org
Analysis and Commentary

Sovereign Difference And Sovereign Deference On The Internet

by Jack Goldsmithvia Yale Law Journal
Monday, March 18, 2019

A theory of global internet governance underlies Andrew Woods’s analysis of how judicial comity doctrines should apply to cross-border data disputes. First is the principle of sovereignty. Nations are sovereign in the sense that they wield legitimate and usually effective authority within a territory, including authority over data and data infrastructure in the territory, and over the people and firms in the territory that use the data and infrastructure. Second, national boundaries roughly reflect differences in the histories, commitments, cultures, norms, and individual and aggregate preferences that governments roughly want to preserve. 

Analysis and Commentary

Technology And The Fourth Amendment

by John Yoo, James C. Phillipsvia National Review
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

We close our series on the new Roberts Court and restoration of the Constitution’s original understanding with the issue most distant from the Framing: the rise of a new high-tech world. We now hold the equivalent of yesterday’s supercomputers in our pockets. Communications occur instantly, from encrypted messages to Twitter blasts that reach millions. Entrepreneurs make fortunes by analyzing and harvesting the 2.5 quintillion bytes of data produced each day.

Analysis and Commentary

What We’re Learning From The Slate Of Democratic Presidential Candidates

by Lanhee J. Chenvia Townhall
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

The 2020 Democratic presidential field continues to take shape, and what’s been more revealing are the people who have decided not to run, as opposed to those who have. Mike Bloomberg, the former Mayor of New York City, would have been a formidable candidate with his wealth and moderate positions on economic issues.  He’s not running.

Analysis and Commentary

Alan Krueger RIP

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Monday, March 18, 2019

Shocking news today: Noted Princeton University economist Alan Krueger died this weekend. He was only 58 years old. Alan was the chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers from 2011 to 2013. He was also co-author, with David Card, of the famous book that challenged the conventional wisdom on the effects of moderate increases in the minimum wage.

Interviews
Interviews

Santelli Exchange: John Taylor On The Fed

interview with John B. Taylorvia CNBC
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow John Taylor discusses the Fed’s balance sheet, inflation, and monetary policy.

Interviews

Scott Atlas: What Can Americans Do About The High Cost Of Prescription Drugs?

interview with Scott W. Atlasvia Lars Larson National Podcast
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Scott Atlas discusses why drug prices in the US are so high and what can be done to reduce the high cost of prescription drugs.

Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson On The Bob McLain Show (19:17)

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia The Bob McLain Show
Monday, March 18, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses his latest book The Case for Trump.

Interviews

Paul Peterson: Over 50 Years, One Study Finds No Progress Has Been Made To Close Achievement Gap

interview with Paul E. Petersonvia WBUR
Monday, March 18, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Paul Peterson discusses a new study which shows that the national achievement gap between low and high-income students has failed to close over the past 50 years.

Interviews

Niall Ferguson On The Lars Larson National Podcast (54:04)

interview with Niall Fergusonvia Lars Larson National Podcast
Monday, March 18, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Niall Ferguson discusses whether humanity should look at the past to solve the problems of the present.

Interviews

Larry Diamond On The Lars Larson National Podcast (1:20:40)

interview with Larry Diamondvia Lars Larson National Podcast
Monday, March 18, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Larry Diamond discusses what needs to happen to make an economic agreement with China.

Interviews

David Henderson On The Lars Larson National Podcast (1:29:45)

interview with David R. Hendersonvia Lars Larson National Podcast
Monday, March 18, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow David Henderson discusses whether an increase in legal immigration would help the US.

In the News
In the News

Mattis Returning To Stanford Months After Pentagon Resignation

featuring General Jim Mattisvia The Hill
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Former Defense Secretary James Mattis, who resigned from the Pentagon's top post in December, is returning to the job he had before joining the Trump administration, Stanford University's Hoover Institution announced Tuesday. Mattis will start May 1 as the Davies Family distinguished fellow at the Hoover Institution.

In the News

For Nearly 50 Years Student Achievement Gap Fails To Close

featuring Eric Hanushek, Paul E. Petersonvia EducationNext
Monday, March 18, 2019

Differences in the performance on math, reading, and science tests between disadvantaged and advantaged U.S. students have remained essentially unchanged for nearly half a century. In a new article for Education Next, Eric A. Hanushek, Paul E. Peterson, Laura M. Talpey, and Ludger Woessmann report that the achievement gap is as wide today as it was for children born in 1954.

In the News

After The Cold War, An Uncertain Peace

featuring Michael McFaulvia MIT News
Monday, March 18, 2019

In MIT talk, Michael McFaul, former U.S. ambassador to Russia, explores tensions between the two countries.

In the News

Raghuram Rajan: The Central Banker Trying To Save Globalisation From Itself

featuring Raghuram Rajanvia City AM
Monday, March 18, 2019

Political and economic debate generally divides around two pillars: markets and state.

In the News

The Leonid Slutsky Collection: A Rare Window On Life In Soviet Penal Colonies

Monday, March 18, 2019

The Leonid Slutsky collection contains a number of personal documents relating to Profesor Slutsky’s ancestors’s careers in the USSR, such as a government-issued ...

News
Grigorii Sukhov (aka Gregory Soohoff)
In the News

The Grigorii Sukhov Papers: A New Collection In The Hoover Institution Archives

Monday, March 18, 2019

Sukhov (aka Gregory Soohoff) edited and published the San Francisco–based Russian-language newspaper Novaia zaria (or Novaya zarya, 1928–1973). His wife, Matrena, assisted him in this work.

News
In the News

Former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis To Return To Hoover Institution

featuring General Jim Mattisvia US News
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

After an acrimonious split with the Trump administration, Mattis will return to the conservative-leaning think tank where he found a home after leaving active duty service.

In the News

Student Achievement Gap Unchanged In Nearly 50 Years, Study Says

featuring Eric Hanushek, Paul E. Petersonvia The Harvard Gazette
Monday, March 18, 2019
But at least it’s not getting wider, say authors, who cite decline in teacher quality as offsetting programs like Head Start.
In the News

Our School System May Be One Of The Worst, But That Makes It Easier To Improve

quoting Caroline M. Hoxbyvia The Telegraph
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

By learning from the world's best, we can go far — unless we believe that all that is best was invented in India.

In the News

Removing Statues Would Censor City's History

quoting Condoleezza Ricevia Richmond Times-Dispatch
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Though this may not be perfect, there is a recent quote attributed to Condoleezza Rice: “I am a firm believer in ‘keep your history before you’ and so I don’t want to rename things that were named for the slave owners. I want us to have to look at those names, and realize what they did.’” Richmond was founded in 1737. London is more than 2,000 years old, as is Paris; Rome was founded in 753 B.C. European cities are beautiful and worthy of visiting because of their history and beautiful monuments. 

In the News

Sorry, Sandy, Capitalism Needs No Redemption

quoting Thomas Sowellvia American Thinker
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Addressing an audience at Austin’s South by Southwest conference, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez called capitalism an “irredeemable system.” “Capitalism is the ideology of capital,” she says. “The most important thing is the concentration of capital and to seek and maximize profit.” 

In the News

Deflating College Degrees

quoting Harvey C. Mansfieldvia The Patriot Post
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

What is a college degree really worth these days, as opposed to how much it costs? One of the Democrats’ favorite policy platforms recently has been the call for “free college.” That this message is so popular with the younger generation may be an indication that the increasing cost of a college degree and the ballooning student debt associated with it (now more than $1.5 trillion) has not placed graduates on the fast track to the higher-paying jobs educated professionals once enjoyed.

In the News

What Medicare For All Means For Doctors And Hospitals

quoting Charles Blahousvia KXLH.com
Monday, March 18, 2019

Americans generally don’t like the idea of giving up their private health insurance. Hospitals and doctors don’t want them to, either. Private insurers typically pay medical providers a whole lot more than Medicare and Medicaid. And that’s one of the main reasons why many hospitals and doctors oppose Medicare for all proposals that would eliminate or minimize private insurance.

In the News

Thomas Sowell Makes A Clear Point About Medicare-For-All

quoting Thomas Sowellvia NOQ Report
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

How was the left able to take heat away from their Medicare-for-All proposal, and more specifically the estimated $32 trillion price tag over a decade? They tripled down with the Green New Deal, which some estimate would cost upwards near $100 trillion.