Hoover Daily Report
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Andrew Nagorski at the Berlin Wall, early 1990, shortly after it fell
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The Outside World Will Bring Down China's Great Firewall

by Niall Fergusonvia Boston Globe
Monday, November 4, 2019

Thirty years ago, I was in love — with Berlin. As an impoverished British graduate student paid in weedy pounds not mighty deutschmarks, I could live there more cheaply than in Hamburg or Munich, and so I spent the summer of 1989 in a friend’s apartment in the Kurfürstenstrasse, dividing my time between the archives and journalism. West Berlin was not only inexpensive, it was fun. But the real attraction was the parallel world of “real existing socialism” next door, on the other side of the Berlin Wall.

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Warrencare

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Heavy taxes for wasteful health expenditures is the road to economic ruin.

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The Trump Doctrine: Deterrence Without Intervention?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, November 5, 2019

The president bets that a booming economy, a beefed-up military, and U.S. energy dominance will deter enemies without the need for preemptive invasions.

Featured

The Fall Of The Wall And My Years As The Spectator’s Man Behind The Iron Curtain

by Timothy Garton Ashvia The Spectator
Monday, November 4, 2019

Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, but to be young was strictly optional. Most of the heroes of 1989 were middle-aged. The leaders of the velvet revolutions, the Vaclav Havels and Lech Walesas, had been through prison, tough times and many a defeat before this incredible victory. Sure, there were often students in the front line — blithe, unattached, unafraid; but what was most moving to me, as I talked to people in the crowds in Leipzig, Gdansk or Prague, were the older men and women who had endured so much and never believed they would see this day.

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Governance In An Emerging New World: Emerging Technology And Nuclear Non-Proliferation

Tuesday, November 5, 2019
Hauck Auditorium, Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The existential threat posed by nuclear weapons is unique, and states have continuously managed that risk across decades of profound global change. How might changing global demographics and emerging 21st-century technologies redefine the nature of nuclear weapons proliferation and their use? Leaders from the Nuclear Threat Initiative will explore potential impacts on nuclear proliferation challenges and on counter-proliferation strategies, and panelists will consider the particular risks in the India-Pakistan nuclear standoff.

The Hoover Institution hosts a public panel discussion "Emerging Technology and Nuclear Non-Proliferation" on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 from 4:00pm - 5:15pm PST. The event will be livestreamed and can be viewed below.

Event
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Area 45: Joe Felter: The Pentagon’s National Defense Strategy

interview with Joseph Felter via Area 45
Monday, November 4, 2019

In an era of competitive influence with China and Russia, what are the policy implications for the Indo-Pacific region? 

Analysis and Commentary

Colin Dueck Makes The Case For Conservative Nationalism

by Michael R. Auslinvia National Review
Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Neither isolationist nor interventionist, it’s a foreign-policy tradition that dates to the Founding.

Analysis and Commentary

How Should Universities Respond To China’s Growing Presence On Their Campuses?

by Larry Diamondvia China File
Monday, November 4, 2019

Over the last several months, opponents of the ongoing protests in Hong Kong have clashed with protest supporters at universities across the world. In Australia and New Zealand, pro-Beijing students have occasionally shoved, doxed, and threatened peaceful protesters. In some cases, these activities seem to have been directed by Chinese embassies and consulates, while others appear to have been spontaneous actions, undertaken by students from mainland China.

Analysis and Commentary

Randal O'Toole's Slam Dunk

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Monday, November 4, 2019

Randal O’Toole’s recent book, Romance of the Rails, is a slam-dunk. Actually, that is an understatement. The book is full of slam-dunks. In chapter after chapter, O’Toole, a long-time fan of railroads, puts his fandom aside and shows what a disaster government subsidies to, and regulations of, rail transportation have been.

Interviews
George Shultz
Interviews

A Conversation With Former Secretary Of State George Shultz

interview with George P. Shultzvia C-SPAN's The Weekly
Friday, October 18, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow George Shultz talks about climate change, diplomacy, and his life in public service.

Interviews

Free Exchange: Tim Kane On The Decline Of Great Powers

interview with Timothy Kanevia CapX
Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Tim Kane discusses why great powers decline and collapse.

Interviews

Jack Goldsmith: Buried Treasure: "A New Take On The Hoffa Mystery"

interview with Jack Goldsmithvia Skullduggery
Monday, November 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Jack Goldsmith discusses his new book In Hoffa's Shadow: A Stepfather, a Disappearance in Detroit, and My Search for the Truth.

Interviews

What Happened to Jimmy Hoffa? | Robert Wright & Jack Goldsmith [The Wright Show]

interview with Jack Goldsmithvia The Wright Show
Monday, November 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Jack Goldsmith discusses his new book In Hoffa's Shadow: A Stepfather, a Disappearance in Detroit, and My Search for the Truth.

Interviews

John Yoo On The John Batchelor Show: "Impeachment Or Bust!"

interview with John Yoovia The John Batchelor Show
Monday, November 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow John Yoo discusses his Washington Post article "It’s now impeachment or bust. As it should be."

Interviews

Amy Zegart: Secretary Pompeo Defends Treatment Of State Dept. Staff

interview with Amy Zegartvia Andrea Mitchell Reports (MSNBC)
Monday, November 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Amy Zegart talks about why she thinks Secretary of State Mike Pompeo didn't do more defend diplomats serving under him.

In the News
In the News

New Book: A Window Into Modern Iran

Tuesday, November 5, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The world-renowned Hoover Institution Library & Archives presents A Window into Modern Iran, The Ardeshir Zahedi Papers at the Hoover Institution Library & Archives. The never-before-published records of Ardeshir Zahedi, Iran’s ambassador to the United States and minister of foreign affairs during the 1960s and 1970s, reveal the inner workings of the shah’s government before the Iranian Revolution. The Zahedi Papers form the richest collection relating to modern Iranian politics and diplomacy anywhere in the world outside of Iran.

Press Releases
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In the News

Coronado’s David Davenport Authors Third Book: “How Public Policy Became War”

featuring David Davenportvia Coronado Eagle & Journal
Monday, November 4, 2019

Proving once again that it’s a small world, David Davenport, the former president of Pepperdine University and now a Coronado resident, grew up in a suburb of Kansas City at the same time I did. He attended Shawnee Mission North High School and graduated a year ahead of me. I went to Shawnee Mission East and another member of the Coronado Community, Village Theatre Owner and Operator Lance Alspaugh attended Shawnee Mission West. Among the three of us, we covered the majority of the educational compass on the Kansas side of the border.

In the News

Remarks By Director Iancu At The European Patent Office (EPO) Patent Information Conference

quoting Stephen Habervia United States Patent and Trademark Office
Monday, November 4, 2019

Remarks delivered at the EPO Patent Information Conference.

In the News

“First Amendment Is First For A Reason.” The Wisdom Of Dave Chappelle

quoting Thomas Sowellvia Independent Institute
Monday, November 4, 2019

On college campuses, the new film No Safe Spaces explains, the First Amendment, intellectual freedom, and the very idea of free speech are under attack with threats, bans, and even violence. That threat has come to the attention of comedian Dave Chapelle, latest winner of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor.

In the News

5 Lessons We Learned From The California Wildfires

quoting Bill Whalenvia The New York Times
Monday, November 4, 2019

This year’s fire season in California has been affected by blackouts, climate change and a destructive fire two years ago.

In the News

Senator Elizabeth Warren’s Looney Medicare-For-All Scheme

quoting Charles Blahousvia People's Pundit Daily
Monday, November 4, 2019

I’ve always considered Senator Bernie Sanders to be the most clueless and misguided of all presidential candidates.

In the News

Notre Dame Student Voting Up Nearly 20 Points In 2018

mentioning Condoleezza Ricevia Notre Dame News
Monday, November 4, 2019

The numbers of student voters at the University of Notre Dame rose nearly 20 percentage points in last year’s midterm elections, according to the new 2014 and 2018 Campus Report from the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement (NSLVE).

Larry Diamond: Confronting Authoritarian Challengers—China and Russia
In the News

Larry Diamond: Democracy In Crisis

mentioning Larry Diamondvia FairVote Minnesota
Thursday, November 14, 2019

Join us for a special conversation and reception featuring Stanford professor and renowned democracy expert...

Michael Auslin 2018
In the News

Single-Day Luminary: Michael Auslin

mentioning Michael R. Auslinvia Indiana University, Bloomington: College Luminaries Program
Thursday, November 7, 2019

The Luminaries Single-Day Experience is a one-day event where influential alumni, called Luminaries, return to campus to share their personal and professional advice. The day features classroom visits, small group interactions, and student and faculty connections.