Hoover Daily Report
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

The Pigou Club Reconsidered

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Tuesday, November 26, 2013
Analysis and Commentary

The War on Human Nature

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review Online
Tuesday, November 26, 2013

For nations as for individuals, pretending self-interest doesn’t exist is perilous.

Analysis and Commentary

Obamacare's Inept Rollout Reveals What Makes Us American

by David Davenportvia Forbes.com
Tuesday, November 26, 2013

An unplanned national teach-in on government over-regulation and the loss of personal liberty.

Analysis and Commentary

Janet Yellen’s Challenge

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas (Hoover Institution)
Tuesday, November 26, 2013

November 25, 2013

Analysis and Commentary

David Davenport on Townhall's Daily Commentary: Cleansing the Public Square of Prayer

with David Davenportvia townhall.com
Tuesday, November 26, 2013

The Townhall.com Daily Commentary brings concise yet penetrating insight from some of the sharpest minds in the conservative world today: reporter and author David Aikman, Weekly Standard publisher, Terry Eastland, and Salem talk radio hosts Hugh Hewitt, Michael Medved, Albert Mohler. .03/27/2014 10:09:16AM EST.

Analysis and Commentary

The Saudis and Israelis Know Best

by Peter Berkowitzvia Real Clear Politics
Monday, November 25, 2013

Early Sunday morning in Geneva, Switzerland, the United States, the other permanent members of the U.N.

Analysis and Commentary

Swiss Come to Their Senses on Soak-the-Rich Vote

by Josef Joffevia Bloomberg View
Monday, November 25, 2013

Some of my best friends are very rich -- people with condos on Central Park West and tastefully refurbished palazzi in Italy. The puzzle: Why do so many of

Interviews
Interviews

Kevin Warsh on Squawk Box

with Kevin Warshvia Squawk Box (CNBC)
Tuesday, November 26, 2013

How important are housing signals for determining the total economic environment, with former Federal Reserve Governor Kevin Warsh, Hoover Institution. Warsh discusses Bank of Japan's policies.

Interviews

Scott Atlas on Lou Dobbs Tonight

with Scott W. Atlasvia Lou Dobbs Tonight (Fox Business)
Monday, November 25, 2013

Lou Dobbs Tonight on Fox Business Network - follow Lou Dobbs weekdays 7pm ET as he covers the major news stories of the day with a focus on politics and economics.

Interviews

Fouad Ajami on Bill Bennett's Morning in America

with Fouad Ajamivia Bill Bennett's Morning In America
Monday, November 25, 2013
Interviews

Paul Gregory on the John Batchelor Show (19:33)

with Paul R. Gregoryvia John Batchelor Show
Monday, November 25, 2013

Guests: Malcolm Hoenlein, Conference of Presidents. Peter Gregory, Hoover. Bruce Webster, and still I persist dot com. 

In the News
In the News

Schools Not Inspiring Students to Participate in Civic Life, Stanford Scholar Says

with William Damonvia Stanford News
Tuesday, November 26, 2013

November 26, 2013

A new report argues for an overhaul in civics education, saying students aren't being taught how to become engaged in society.

In the News

Obamacare and Health Spending

with Charles Blahousvia Corner (National Review Online)
Monday, November 25, 2013

As their hopes and claims have been dashed in recent weeks, some champions of Obamacare have been clinging to one last assertion: that the law is helping to bring down overall health spending. Harvard’s David Cutler tried to spin this tale a little earlier this month in the Washington Post, and the White House’s Council of Economic Advisers released a report last week that, while not actually claiming as much, tried to enable less careful outsiders to do so. And of course, less careful outsiders have obliged.  Today, Charles Blahous of the Mercatus Center and the Hoover Institution (who is also one of the trustees of Social Security and Medicare), takes on those claims using the available data and projections from the CMS actuaries — the same data source that Cutler and the CEA pointed to. He shows that the evidence simply does not support the idea that Obamacare is reducing health costs and that in fact, taken as a whole, the law seems to be bending the cost curve upward, not downward. He concludes, with admirable restraint:  Public confidence in the ACA took a beating when it was revealed that millions would lose health coverage that they had been told they could keep. Now the public is being told that the ACA is responsible for government actuaries’ improved health spending projections, when an examination of those projections clearly shows that not to be so. If the supporters of the ACA want to win back public support and confidence, they will need to find a stronger case for the virtues of the law.