Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Perspectives On Policy: Free Market Environmentalism

by Terry Andersonvia PolicyEd
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Most environmental problems result from the tragedy of the commons. The typical response to environmental issues is to turn to government regulation. In contrast, free market environmentalism embraces the lessons of markets by defining and enforcing property rights to prevent overconsumption or other negative outcomes.

Gender Equality?
Featured

On The Basis Of Sex

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas
Monday, January 7, 2019

Ginsburg's gender crusade, while noble, also created market distortions.

Featured

Actual Emergencies Come And Go, But Federal Emergency Declarations Endure

by David Davenportvia Washington Examiner
Tuesday, January 8, 2019

As President Trump considers whether to declare a national state of emergency to build his border wall, few Americans realize they have lived under nearly 30 states of national emergency for most of their lives. Emergencies come and go, but emergency declarations remain. The oldest national emergency still on the books was declared by President Jimmy Carter during the Iran crisis 40 years ago. There are presently national "emergencies" covering everything from vessels in Cuba to democratic processes in Zimbabwe, from exports to cyberwarfare and narcotics trafficking.

Featured

Remembering The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

by Andrew Robertsvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Simcha Rotem, one of the last-known surviving fighters in the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising of April-May 1943, died in Jerusalem on December 23, 2018, aged 94. His death prompted a good deal of global coverage, since the story of the Ghetto Uprising—not to be confused with the Warsaw Home Army Uprising of August-October 1944—is an integral one to the story of Jewish resistance to the Nazis during the Second World War.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Executive Agreements: International Lawmaking Without Accountability?

by Jack Goldsmith, Curtis A. Bradley, Oona A. Hathawayvia Lawfare
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

In a post last month, we described the sharp decline in the presidential use of Article II treaties—reaching a new low in the Trump administration, which so far has submitted only one such treaty to the Senate. This decline does not mean that the United States has stopped concluding international agreements. 

Analysis and Commentary

The Important, Justifiable, And Constrained Role Of Nationality In Foreign Intelligence Surveillance

by Peter Swire, Jesse Woo, Deven R. Desaivia Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, January 8, 2019

This article addresses whether governments ever have a justified basis for treating targets of surveillance differently, in any way, based on nationality. Topics include (1) three ways nationality can matter to surveillance; (2) reasons for stricter rules for law enforcement and domestic collection; (3) reasons for different rules based on the location of collection; (4) the universalist critique of surveillance laws based on nationality; and (5) reasons that can justify stricter surveillance rules based on nationality. Stricter protections are warranted because surveillance of nationals and others with a close connection to the domestic policy poses a special threat to the political opposition and free press of a country, both of which play crucial roles in limiting abuses of state power.

Analysis and Commentary

Diversity, Part 2: The Who, What, When, Where, Why, And How

by Alvin Rabushkavia Thoughtful Ideas
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Who are we talking about in the name of Diversity?  How can we  know the extent of Diversity in meeting goals to increase Diversity unless we know who qualifies as Diverse?

Analysis and Commentary

Cowen Defends Existence Of World Bank

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

"I think America and yes DT [Donald Trump] should pick the next [World] Bank president and should pick an American. How do you think it is going to go the next time the Bank calls for more capital from the US and UK?"

Hoover Institution Archives Poster Collection, JA 120
Analysis and Commentary

The Meiji Restoration

by Michael R. Auslinvia Stanford University Press
Monday, October 1, 2018

For Japan, the Meiji Restoration of 1868 has something of the significance that the French Revolution has for France: it is the point from which modern history begins. In this now classic work of Japanese history, the late W. G. Beasley offers a comprehensive account of the origins, development, and immediate aftermath of the events that restored Imperial rule to Japan.

Analysis and Commentary

China Is Trying To Woo U.S. Allies. The White House’s Response Contains Glaring Failures.

by Jim Hoaglandvia The Washington Post
Sunday, January 6, 2019

Emboldened by the Trump administration’s denigration and threatened abandonment of traditional U.S. allies in Europe and other regions, China has launched a strategic campaign to woo, gain control over or otherwise undermine nations that have long supported U.S. goals and alliance management abroad. 

Interviews
Interviews

Bill Whalen: The Oval Office Gave It A Certain Majesty. Pelosi Goes For The Jugular. The Best: “Politicians Are Forever Putting Up Walls – Not To Keep Out People They Don’t Like, But To Protect People Whom They Love.”

interview with Bill Whalenvia The John Batchelor Show
Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Bill Whalen discusses President Trump's speech about the wall and whether the president helped his case by framing the matter in a humanitarian manner.

In the News
In the News

Hoover Fellow Warns About “Shadow Banking” Threat

Tuesday, January 8, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

“Shadow banks” are capable of the kind of reckless mortgage lending that led to the 2008–09 financial crisis, a Hoover Institution scholar says. Like regular banks, shadow banks lend money to consumers, but these banks are not subject to as many regulations. For example, they do not use bank deposits to finance lending.

News
In the News

Education 20/20 Series With: Mona Charen & Ramesh Ponnuru

Wednesday, January 9, 2019
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Education 20/20 Series with: Mona Charen & Ramesh Ponnuru" on Wednesday, January 9, 2019 from 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM EST.

Event
In the News

New Calif. Governor Proposes Middle-Income Health Premium Subsidy

quoting Lee Ohanianvia Think Advisor
Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Gavin Newsom began his term as California’s 40th governor Monday by proposing that the state provide health insurance premium subsidies for residents earning from 400% to 600% of the federal poverty level.

In the News

Guest Opinion: Can You Go A Year Without Anger?

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia Deseret News (UT)
Tuesday, January 8, 2019

As the holiday season ends and we pack away the warmth and peace that tends to accompany time spent on faith, family and giving, we can feel the collision of re-entry into the world of angry post-holiday headlines and arguments. But is this shocking relapse absolutely necessary? Do we have more power over anger than we realize?

In the News

Team Trump Should Be Careful What It Wishes For On China

by Steven J. Davisvia The Washington Post
Monday, January 7, 2019

For months, President Trump’s economic advisers have cheered Chinese economic suffering, celebrating every sign of weakness — in stock markets, manufacturing, retail sales, investment — since it surely means China is on the verge of a humiliating capitulation to Trump’s demands.

In the News

The Year Of Trump?

quoting Niall Fergusonvia Project Syndicate
Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Time magazine did not choose Donald Trump as its Person of the Year in 2018, but it may do so this year. Trump ended last year facing criticism for announcing troop withdrawals from Syria and Afghanistan without consulting allies (resulting in the resignation of his respected defense secretary, James Mattis) and partially shutting down the government over a Mexican border wall. In 2019, with Democrats having taken over the House of Representatives, he will face increasing criticism of his foreign policy.

In the News

Why Americans And Britons Work Such Long Hours

quoting Lee Ohanianvia The Economist
Saturday, December 22, 2018

The year ahead will, like every year, consist of just under 8,800 hours. Most people will spend about a third of that time sleeping, and another third or so arguing on social media. Much of the remainder will be spent at work.

In the News

Could A Chinese-Made Metro Car Spy On Us? Many Experts Say Yes.

quoting Andrew Grottovia The Washington Post
Monday, January 7, 2019

The warnings sound like the plot of a Hollywood spy thriller: The Chinese hide malware in a Metro rail car’s security camera system that allows surveillance of Pentagon or White House officials as they ride the Blue Line — sending images back to Beijing.

In the News

Gavin Newsom Takes Center Stage

quoting Bill Whalenvia Capitol Weekly
Monday, January 7, 2019

Gavin Newsom, the former San Francisco mayor who roiled Democrats across the country when he issued marriage licenses to same-sex couples, was sworn in Monday as California’s 40th governor. He succeeds the unprecedented, largely successful tenure of four-time governor and fellow Democrat Jerry Brown, who moseyed on back to his 2,500-acre ranch in Colusa.

In the News

The Shutdown's Cybersecurity Costs

quoting Andrew Grottovia Axios
Tuesday, January 8, 2019

The government is on hiatus. Enemies of the U.S. are not.