Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

The Death Of The Healthcare Market

by John H. Cochrane via Grumpy Economist
Wednesday, January 30, 2019

People really do not need health insurance for regular small expenses, as they do not need car insurance to "pay for" oil changes. And any insurance system relies on an underlying cash market to find what the right prices are. Collision insurance works reasonably well because there is a supply and demand market for auto repair in which people pay their own money and there are competitive suppliers and free entry, offering services along a wide quality-price spectrum.

Featured

The Hidden Costs Of The LA Teachers Strike

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Unions are monopolists that work against the public good.

Featured

There Is No Sino-American Trade War

by Martin Feldsteinvia Project Syndicate
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Chinese negotiators recently offered to buy enough American products to reduce the bilateral trade deficit to zero by 2024. Why, then, have US negotiators rejected that as a way to end the dispute?

Featured

New Stanford Exhibit Showcases Propaganda Posters Made During China’s Cultural Revolution

featuring Hoover Institutionvia Stanford News
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

About 50 posters, on view at the East Asia Library through April 24, show propaganda messages and artwork produced during Mao Zedong’s rule in China.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

The Libertarian: Harold Demsetz And The Legacy Of The Chicago School

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The Libertarian
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

How a group of renegade academics reshaped our understanding of economics.

Analysis and Commentary

Conflating Ideas Weakens Constitutional Principles

by Peter Berkowitzvia Real Clear Politics
Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Like an individual mixed up about his convictions, a nation perplexed about its principles is prone to self-inflicted wounds. Both are likely to wander aimlessly and choose friends poorly while falling for the blandishments of adversaries. They are prone to misjudge their interests and misconstrue justice. A nation perplexed about its principles exacerbates citizens’ muddle about their convictions. 

Analysis and Commentary

Arbitration With Uninformed Consumers

by Mark Egan, Amit Seru via Harvard Law School
Monday, January 28, 2019

Arbitration is a private mechanism for resolving disputes outside of the court system. In arbitration the contracting parties present their case to a private arbitrator who then issues a legally-binding resolution to the dispute. When consumers purchase a product or service, the purchase often contains a pre-dispute arbitration provision, which legally mandates that the consumer must resolve any related dispute using arbitration.

Analysis and Commentary

Who Do You Sue?

by Daphne Kellervia Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

This essay closely examines the effect on free-expression rights when platforms such as Facebook or YouTube silence their users’ speech. The first part describes the often messy blend of government and private power behind many content removals, and discusses how the combination undermines users’ rights to challenge state action. The second part explores the legal minefield for users—or potentially, legislators—claiming a right to speak on major platforms. The essay contends that questions of state and private power are deeply intertwined. To understand and protect internet users’ rights, we must understand and engage with both.

Analysis and Commentary

Diversity, Part 5. The Who, What, When, Where, Why, And How

by Alvin Rabushkavia Thoughtful Ideas
Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Part 2 set forth the racial/ethnic categories used by the Census Bureau and universities in the Common Data Set. These categories are the basis for quantifying the degree of Diversity in universities, and every other social, economic, and political organization. Including non-Whites, or People of Color, in White groups and women in male groups becomes the measure for quantifying Inclusion. 

Analysis and Commentary

Greg Mankiw Gets It Partly Right

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

In a blog post titled “Who is the prototypical rich person?” Greg Mankiw responds to a pretty bad New York Times op/ed by Emmanual Saez and Gabriel Zucman. I was waiting for someone to spot a pretty big error in Greg’s piece, but no one has. So I’ll point it out.

Interviews
Interviews

Larry Diamond: Chinese Influence, American Interests

interview with Larry Diamondvia The Diplomat
Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Larry Diamond discusses the trajectory of Chinese influence in US technology innovation and whether Chinese influence is a threat to US democracy.

Interviews

Elizabeth Economy: The Third Revolution: Xi JinPing and the New Chinese State

interview with Elizabeth Economyvia The Lionel Gelber Prize
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Elizabeth Economy discusses her book The Third Revolution: Xi JinPing and the New Chinese State.

Interviews

Lanhee Chen On Forward Thinking Politics (10:35)

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia Forward Thinking Politics
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Lanhee Chen discusses the government shutdown and whether we will see the government shut down again in the next few weeks.

In the News
In the News

The Magazines Publishing One Another’s Work

quoting Morris P. Fiorinavia The New York Times
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Polarization is everywhere. But it’s being challenged in Poland by a handful of magazines across the political spectrum. They’ve begun sharing articles, to show readers a variety of viewpoints.

In the News

Why Has Emotion Replaced Reason In America?

quoting Victor Davis Hanson, Niall Fergusonvia The Trumpet
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

“Facts are stubborn things.” That’s what American founding father John Adams famously said. But in modern America, facts are not so stubborn, and you don’t get famous by clinging to them. You get famous by being stubborn with your emotions. In modern America, more stubborn than facts, truth and logic are emotions, feelings and “personal truth.”

In the News

Lessons For India: How Alibaba Uses Tech To Give Employment To Unskilled Villagers

quoting Michael Spencevia Financial Express
Monday, January 28, 2019

Alibaba -- the Chinese e-commerce giant -- helps people learn relevant job skills at work so that even those who don't possess formal education could be employed.

In the News

Powell Faces Early Reckoning On Fed's $4-Trillion Question

quoting Darrell Duffievia Reuters
Monday, January 28, 2019

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has a problem: how to explain that the Fed may soon begin to taper its ongoing asset-shedding operation without looking like he’s hunkering down for a coming recession, or caving to U.S. President Donald Trump.

In the News

Law’s Influencers

quoting Jack Goldsmithvia Harvard Law Today
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Jack Goldsmith didn’t plan on building a behemoth. When the Harvard Law professor teamed up with University of Texas at Austin law professor Robert Chesney ’97 and Brookings Institution writer Benjamin Wittes to start the Lawfare blog in 2010, it was launched, he says, with “very modest ambitions and no planning.”

In the News

Why Cyberwar Is Contributing To A Potential Doomsday

quoting Herbert Linvia Fifth Domain
Friday, January 25, 2019

A wave of new cyberattacks and an increase in information warfare tactics are helping to create an existential threat to humanity, according to the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, who said in their annual report that its Doomsday Clock “is two minutes to midnight.”

In the News

Kamala Harris And The US State Looking To Take Down Trump

quoting Bill Whalenvia BBC News
Monday, January 28, 2019

The propulsion of senator and lawyer Kamala Harris to front-runner status among the Democrats hoping to take on President Donald Trump in 2020 has underlined the resurgent political power of her home state.

In the News

In Their Own Words

mentioning Jack Goldsmithvia Harvard Law Today
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Excerpts from the recent and forthcoming faculty article by Jack Goldsmith, "Strengths Become Vulnerabilities: How a Digital World Disadvantages the United States in Its International Relations."