Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Public Option Kills Private Insurance

by Scott W. Atlasvia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

At the center of Joe Biden’s health-care proposal is the “public option”—a government insurance policy that would compete with private plans. Mr. Biden has obviously seen the polling. By 57% to 37%, Americans reject the idea, put forth by some of Mr. Biden’s Democratic rivals, of abolishing private insurance in favor of “Medicare for All.”

Featured

America’s Values Will Help Win A New Cold War

interview with Niall Fergusonvia The Catalyst
Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Niall Ferguson discusses what he considers an emerging Cold War with China. This Cold War may be more difficult, he says, but the US can prevail by appealing to the Chinese people, many of whom appreciate our democratic capitalism. Our values will also help the US prevail.

Featured

New Issue Of Hoover Digest Online

via Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 17, 2019

The summer issue of Hoover Digest is now available online. The journal focuses on topics both classical—the economy, personal freedom, the role of government—and timely, such as cybersecurity, terrorism, and geopolitical shifts. 

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

“A Simple Accident?” Perhaps, But Not A Political Sliding Door

by Bill Whalenvia Forbes
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

In news not concerning presidential tweeting, we’re experiencing a wave of Camelot nostalgia courtesy of the 20th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s Jr.’s fatal plane crash (July 16 also being the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11’s lift-off and, more ominously, the 229th anniversary of a plot of land along the Potomac River being designated as the future seat of the federal government).

Analysis and Commentary

Perhaps Progress Against Poverty Helped Test Scores Rise

by Michael J. Petrillivia Education Next
Wednesday, July 17, 2019

This is the fourth in a series of posts looking at whether the nation’s schools have improved over the past quarter-century or so—what might be considered the modern “reform era” of American education. The first two posts demonstrated that student outcomes rose significantly from the mid-1990s until the Great Recession —especially in reading and math, but in other academic subjects, too. 

Analysis and Commentary

What NotPetya Tells Us About The New Era Of Cyber Warfare Two Years Later

by Jamil Jaffervia Homeland Security Today
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Last month’s two-year anniversary of the NotPetya cyber attack provides a unique opportunity to assess some of the key strategic lessons learned from the attack and what might be done on a national level to address the threat of similar attacks going forward. Perhaps the most distinctive outcome of the NotPetya attack was the sheer scale of the economic damage it caused worldwide – estimated to be over $10 billion – and the fact that the damage was borne not by intended targets of the attack, but rather by a series of private-sector companies largely unconnected to Ukraine.

Interviews
Interviews

Bill Whalen On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Bill Whalenvia The John Batchelor Show
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Bill Whalen discusses his California On Your Mind article "California Can’t Avoid The Next “Big One” Can It Weather The Political Aftershock?"

Interviews

The Lawfare Podcast: Larry Diamond On 'Ill Winds'

interview with Larry Diamondvia Lawfare
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Larry Diamond discusses his book Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, in which he charts the rise of illiberal leaders across six continents; the growing influence of China and Russia; and how the election of Donald Trump has affected all of this. Diamond argues that, to curb rising despotism, the United States must reclaim its role as an ardent defender of global democracy. 

In the News
Li Rui Papers now available hoover institution
In the News

Li Rui Papers Open For Research

Friday, July 12, 2019

The Hoover Institution Library & Archives is pleased to announce that the papers of prominent Chinese historian and politician Li Rui are now open for research. Consisting of correspondence, diaries, meeting minutes...

News
In the News

The World’s Top 50 Thinkers 2019

quoting Niall Fergusonvia Prospect
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Prospect salutes the scientists, philosophers and writers reshaping our times—and asks for your help choosing our 2019 winners. Never doubt that thoughtful minds can change the world; they are the only things that ever do. Margaret Mead is thought to have said something like that, which chimes with Keynes, who wrote that the self-styled practical men running the world were unwittingly guided by forgotten academic scribblers. For Victor Hugo, meanwhile, the one thing stronger than all the armies in the world was “an idea whose time had come.”

In the News

How Big Data Can Help You Choose Better Health Insurance

quoting M. Kate Bundorfvia Fast Company
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

People have a hard time making choices when it comes to health insurance, so researchers are developing tools to help patients make the best decisions. There are plenty of easy consumer choices. Paper clips: easy. Dish sponges: easy. Those products sit at one end of the spectrum. At the other end, impossibly distant, is health insurance.

 

In the News

How Real History Shaped ‘The Fountainhead’ — And Kept Ayn Rand’s Fans Coming Back

quoting Jennifer Burnsvia Alternet
Monday, July 15, 2019

Fans of Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead consider the novel timeless, with its themes of individual freedom and the heroism of the creator. But the story — about an innovative architect of skyscrapers who grows frustrated by critics skeptical of his vision — is also a direct product of the historical moment leading up to its publication 75 years ago Monday, on May 7, 1943.

In the News

Reining In Government By Dear Colleague Letter: An Update

quoting Charles Calomirisvia Cato Institute
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

For many decades, critics have noted that agencies were using Dear Colleague and guidance letters, memos and so forth — also known variously as subregulatory guidance, stealth regulation and regulatory dark matter — to grab new powers and ban new things in the guise of interpreting existing law, all while bypassing notice-and-comment and other constraints on actual rulemaking.

In the News

Opinion | We Should Not Be Crying Wolf Over Dollar Sovereign Bonds

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia Live Mint
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Even if we assume a falling rupee, there is no reason why some risk cannot be taken on such bonds. It is interesting how committed globalizers suddenly turn near-nationalist when it comes to sovereign borrowings in non-rupee debt.

In the News

Beijing Diplomats Now Tap Into The World Of Tweeting

quoting Elizabeth Economyvia The Standard
Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Chinese diplomats are increasingly turning to Twitter to defend Beijing's policies to the international community, taking combative stances and courting controversy on a platform banned in their own country. While officials typically stay away from sharing views on social media, a tweetstorm from a Pakistan-based diplomat is raising eyebrows.

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In the News

Ilhan Omar Lets Rip Another Outburst Of Anti-Semitism

quoting Ayaan Hirsi Alivia Clarion Project
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Congresswomen Ilhan Omar let rip another outburst of anti-Semitism this weekend at a conference in Philadelphia where she was speaking. Congresswomen Ilhan Omar let rip another outburst of anti-Semitism this weekend at a conference in Philadelphia where she was speaking. Commenting at the Netroots Conference on “the situation in Palestine,” Omar declared, “What we are doing now is having hypocrisy in not celebrating non-violent movements there and condemning it [sic].”

In the News

Study: Maryland Charter Students’ Gains Outpace Those At Traditional Schools; Black, Hispanic Pupils Benefit Most

quoting Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia The Baltimore Sun
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

A new study has found that students at Maryland charter schools, especially those who are black or Hispanic, have on average made greater academic progress than their counterparts in traditional public schools. While the study noted deficiencies in about a third of charter schools, the student gains were the equivalent of them getting about an extra month of learning over the typical 180-day school year, according to Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes, or CREDO.

In the News

India Needs To Tap Into Foreign Capital To Trigger Investment And Growth: CEA Subramanian

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia Money Control
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

He also said that although the goal is a bit of a stretch, achieving $5 trillion economy by 2024-25 is possible. There is a need to consider tapping into foreign capital to trigger a cycle of investment and growth, Chief Economic Adviser (CEA) Krishnamurthy Subramanian said on July 16.