Monday, July 1, 1996

1996 No. 1

About Herbert Hoover and the Hoover Institution

by John Raisianvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

The Hoover Digest was conceived as a new and important vehicle to reach out to an informed public interested in knowledge and ideas about public policy. To set the stage and to describe the roots and purpose of the Hoover Institution, Director John Raisian offers background for the thinking and writings that will appear in this and future volumes.

How to Think about Taxes

by Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Michael J. Boskin presents a succinct analysis of the principal tax reform proposals of the day. A straightforward guide to a complicated subject.

How a Flatter Tax Could Have Kept the Cleveland Browns in Cleveland

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker won the Nobel Prize for applying the discipline of economics to social problems, including crime, education, and drug addiction. Here he applies economics to major league sports.

A 1962 Flat-Tax Proposal Revisited

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Most of the flat-tax plans being bruited about in Washington today derive from the proposal that Hoover fellows Robert E. Hall and Alvin Rabushka made over a decade ago. As it happens, Hoover fellow Milton Friedman wrote about a flat tax more than three decades ago. Here Friedman presents that original plan.

Why the Flat Tax Isn't Nuts

by Robert J. Barro, Milton Friedman, Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

When presidential candidate Steve Forbes championed a flat tax virtually identical to the one first proposed by Hoover fellows Robert E. Hall and Alvin Rabushka, critics hooted, calling the flat tax a nutty idea. The Wall Street Journal asked a group of renowned economists, including Hoover fellows Robert J. Barro, Gary S. Becker, and Milton Friedman, to comment.

Race and the Curse of Good Intentions

by Shelby Steelevia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Racists treat whites and blacks differently in the name of white supremacy. President Bill Clinton does so in the name of affirmative action. According to Hoover fellow Shelby Steele, one is as wrong as the other.

How to Fix Social Security

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

There has been a great deal of interest lately in privatizing Social Security--presidential candidate Steve Forbes even went so far as to make Social Security privatization one of the planks of his platform. But how, exactly, can privatization be accomplished? In this essay, which he first published in 1972, Hoover fellow Milton Friedman tells how to get from here to there.

The Surprising Politics of School Choice

by Terry M. Moevia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Terry M. Moe describes the surprising political alliances now being forged in the school choice movement--and argues that the movement is gaining strength.

Abolish Superfund

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller, M.D., looks at the Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund program. Established more than a decade and a half ago as a five-year project, Superfund has never been shown to have done any good but has without question caused a great deal of harm. So what keeps Superfund going? "Dogs bark, cows moo, and regulators regulate."

Israel's War on Terrorism

by Abraham D. Sofaervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Israel has declared war on terrorism. Hoover fellow Abraham D. Sofaer tells the new prime minister how to wage it.

Korea Opens Its Markets . . . Slowly

by Jongryn Movia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Reporting on two Hoover conferences on Korea, Hoover fellow Jongryn Mo asserts that Koreans are, slowly, opening their markets. And growing feisty.

RED FLAG OVER HONG KONG

by Alvin Rabushka, Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, David Newmanvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

On July 1, 1997, the British Crown Colony of Hong Kong will cease to exist, becoming instead the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China. Will the new Hong Kong continue to flourish or stagnate? Hoover fellows Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alvin Rabushka and their coauthor, David Newman, assert that we will all be able to learn a great deal by watching the value of a single, critical item, the Hong Kong dollar.

A Brutal Debacle

by Richard F. Staarvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Richard F. Staar portrays the 1994-1996 war that mighty Russia has waged on tiny Chechnya, a breakaway ethnic enclave on Russia's southern flank. This conflict has claimed some forty thousand civilian lives--and it continues to fester.

Trotsky, the Fugitive

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Although a leader of the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, the brilliant theorist and orator Leon Trotsky was expelled from the Communist Party in 1927 and then, in 1929, banished from the Soviet Union. His crime? Opposing Stalin. In 1940, Stalin's secret police murdered Trotsky in Mexico. Reviewing a new biography of Trotsky, Hoover fellow Robert Conquest reflects on a man characterized both by ruthlessness and by "the glamor of the Lost Cause."

Operation Osoaviakhim

by Norman M. Naimarkvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

In The Russians in Germany, Hoover fellow Norman M. Naimark has written a definitive account of the Soviet occupation of eastern Germany (later the German Democratic Republic, or East Germany) in the years immediately after World War II. All the Allies engaged in a postwar scramble for German scientists and technology, Naimark argues, but the Soviets, particularly dependent on acquiring German know-how, ordered German scientists rounded up and shipped to the Soviet Union. Here Naimark describes one such Soviet exercise.

Judicial Reform in Latin America

by Edgardo Buscaglia, William Ratliff, Maria Dakoliasvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

The movement toward democracy and free markets in Latin America can only go so far if the courts remain corrupt and inefficient. Hoover fellow William Ratliff joins Edgardo Buscaglia Jr. and Maria Dakolias in describing the principal problems and in offering an outline for reform.

History and Culture

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell offers a brilliant meditation on the grand theme of his new book, Migrations and Culture, and indeed of much of his life's work, history as "an anchor in reality."

Thoughts of a Philosophical Fighter Pilot

by James Bond Stockdalevia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Congressional Medal of Honor winner and Hoover fellow James Bond Stockdale reflects on the highest ideals of the ancient Greeks and the unlikely way in which he encountered those ideals--during his seven years of confinement and torture in a North Vietnamese prison.

The Outlook for Civil Comity

by Seymour Martin Lipsetvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Seymour Martin Lipset looks at the data and concludes that the melting pot is still melting--but that American politics are at an angry boil.

George P. Shultz on China and Bosnia

by George P. Shultzvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Hoover fellow and former Secretary of State George P. Shultz recently spent a morning talking about the challenges posed to U.S. foreign policy by China, one of the biggest countries on earth, and Bosnia, one of the smallest. Shultz answered questions put to him by Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

Vladimirov's Russia

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Ivan Alekseevich Vladimirov led two lives. In public, he painted propaganda pictures, becoming a master of socialist realism. In private, he painted harrowing scenes of the Russian Revolution and its aftermath, achieving true realism. Scores of his sketchbooks and canvases are in the Hoover Archives. Here archivist Elena S. Danielson describes Vladimirov's life and work.

Moscow's Secret Gold

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

In 1992, Boris Yeltsin outlawed the Communist Party, declaring it a criminal organization. Party leaders challenged Yeltsin in court. Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman has been examining the documents in this historic case.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.