Tuesday, October 1, 1996

1996 No. 2

Property Law 101

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

What causes economic growth? Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell surveys commonplace theories and finds many of themincomplete. What do they overlook? Property rights.

The Numbers Tell The Story: Economic Freedom Spurs Growth

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Nobel Prize–winner and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker surveys the evidence from more than a hundred countries.

Is Democracy Good for Growth?

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

It sounds nice to try to install democracy in places like Haiti and Somalia, but does it make any sense? Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro has his doubts.

Risk and Return

by Paul M. Romervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Economic growth does more than raise living standards; it calls forth the best in the human spirit. A meditation (including a good economist joke) by Hoover fellow Paul M. Romer.

Fear Not a Tax Cut

by David Tellvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Former Hoover media fellow David Tell examines the case against a tax cut--and refutes it. A primer for this political season.

Why Our Tax System is Good for Government But Bad for People

by W. Kurt Hauservia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

The federal tax code does a good job of redistributing income and rewarding special interest groups. It does a lousy job of promoting economic growth. Vice Chairman of the Hoover Institution Board of Overseers W. Kurt Hauser explains why.

Workfare, Not Welfare

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

The main welfare initiative of the Clinton administration has been the enlargement of the earned income tax credit program. "Mr. Clinton's support," Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro argues, "is not sufficient reason to regard the program as mistaken."

The Squabble over the Minimum Wage

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Why did so many economists back the hike in the minimum wage earlier this year? In part because of a study based on lousy data. Hoover fellow David R. Henderson explains.

How to End Welfare--and Help the Working Poor

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

We should stop tinkering with the welfare system and forget about the minimum wage. We already have a way to help the working poor: the earned income tax credit. An analysis by Nobel Prize–winner and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker.

The Minimum Wage Was High in the First Place

by Thomas E. MaCurdy, John F. Coganvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Hoover fellows John F. Cogan and Thomas E. MaCurdy argue that when Congress and the president hiked the minimum wage last summer, they were making a dumb mistake. The hike hurt those it was intended to help and helped those who didn't need it. And the effective minimum wage rate was already at a historic high in the first place.

How We Adopted A Soviet-Style Health Care System--and How We Can End It

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Health care delivery in the United States has become so depersonalized as to be virtually Soviet. Don't believe it? Nobel Prize–winner and Hoover fellow Milton Friedman proves the point by quoting Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, a Hoover honorary fellow. The way to end depersonalized care? Friedman argues for medical savings accounts.

The California Civil Rights Initiative

by Robert Zelnickvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

ABC News correspondent and Hoover media fellow Bob Zelnick examines the issues at stake and the personalities involved.What does Ward Connerly think of Willie Brown? Read on.

The Case for Colorblind Justice

by Terry Eastlandvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Affirmative action was supposed to be a temporary measure limited to blacks. It was soon made permanent and extended to Hispanics, women, and others. Editor in Chief of Forbes MediaCritic magazine and former Hoover media fellow Terry Eastland argues for ending affirmative action once and for all.

Is This the Year?

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell surveys challenges to affirmative action now taking place throughout the country. "Neither in courts of law nor in the political process can affirmative action stand on its merits."

Cover Charge

by Edward Paul Lazearvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Current immigration policy establishes annual quotas for countries of origin--just so many French each year, just so many Mexicans, just so many Nigerians. Hoover fellow Edward P. Lazear has a better idea. Sell the slots outright.

How to Keep Nuclear Weapons out of Terrorists' Hands

by Jessica Sternvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Nuclear smuggling has become a grave problem. National Fellow Jessica Stern tells how to prevent a calamity.

A Muddle Wrapped in a Mystery

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Robert Conquest examines the prospects for peace and prosperity in Russia. His conclusion? "Cross your fingers."

Boris Yeltsin's Bellicose Backers

by Richard F. Staarvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Is the United States financing the very Russians who want to start a new cold war? Hoover fellow Richard F. Staar thinks it might be.

Five Months that Shook Russia

by John B. Dunlopvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

From October 1994 to February 1995, Russian militants--the "party of war"--sought to block free-market reforms and to reestablish an imperial foreign policy. They almost got away with it. Hoover fellow John B. Dunlop tells the story.

Why Some Latin Countries Prosper and Others Don't

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Why do some Latin countries grow more quickly than others? Argentina, for example, more quickly than Venezuela? Hoover fellow David R. Henderson suggests a one-word answer. Freedom.

Fujimori Speaks

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori almost never grants interviews to Americans. For Hoover fellow William Ratliff, he made an exception. How one man is attempting a revolution--and how his critics are responding.

The NonThreat of North Korea

via Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

North Korea represents one of the last Stalinist nations on earth--a powerful military, a poor populace, and rulers who can appear deranged. Will North Korea attack South Korea, as it did in 1950? Relax, says Hoover fellow Robert J. Myers.

The Right Kind of Corruption

by Hilton L. Rootvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Payoffs and slush funds may be rampant in Asian countries such as South Korea and Taiwan, but they don't seem to have interfered with economic growth. Hoover fellow Hilton L. Root explains why.

Nobody Here But Us Liberals

by Seymour Martin Lipsetvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Think America is a conservative country? Think again. Hoover fellow Seymour Martin Lipset explains that there are no true conservatives here--or, for that matter, any true socialists either--just different shades of classical liberals.

How Little England Beat Big France

by Barry R. Weingast, Kenneth A. Schultzvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Authoritarian states hold an advantage over democratic ones because they can act quickly and decisively, right? Wrong. Hoover fellow Barry R. Weingast and his coauthor, Kenneth A. Schultz, argue that every time an authoritarian state and a liberal state get into a protracted fight, the liberal state wins. Here Weingast and Schultz examine the century and a quarter of conflict between England and France during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Shelby Steele: The Content of His Character

by Shelby Steele, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Shelby Steele talks about his opposition to affirmative action, his upbringing, and his hopes for black Americans. An interview with Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

Rose and Milton Friedman: Our Early Years

by Milton Friedman, Rose D. Friedman, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

"If you don't want to be forgotten," Benjamin Franklin wrote in Poor Richard's Almanac, "do something worth the writing, or write something worth the reading." Rose and Milton Friedman decided to do both, leading extraordinary lives, then composing their memoirs, on which they are now working. Here they pause from the hard labor of writing to talk with Hoover fellow Peter Robinson about their early years.

The Economics of Ideas

by Kevin Kellyvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Only forty, Hoover fellow Paul M. Romer has already stood a great deal of economic theory on its head. A profile of Romer and his work. By Kevin Kelly.

An Outside-the-Box Economist

by Claire Menckevia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Nobel Prize–winner and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker has spent a career applying the discipline of economics to noneconomic problems, such as drug addiction and family formation. A glimpse of one of the profession's most intriguing thinkers. By Claire Mencke.

I Voted for Bobby Kennedy

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

In this wry account, Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro describes his journey from modern liberal to classical liberal. The confessions of a free-market economist

Eyewitness to a Cataclysm

by Terence Emmons, Bertrand M. Patenaude, Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Frank Golder--professor of Russian history and the first curator of the Hoover War Collection--founded the extraordinary Slavic collection now housed in the Hoover archives. Golder visited Russia repeatedly during the first three decades of the century, witnessing Russia's entry into the Great War, the Revolution, the early workings of Lenin's government, and the changes in Soviet society after Lenin's death. Herewith excerpts from Golder's historic diary and letters, selected by Acting Archivist Elena S. Danielson.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.