Tuesday, July 1, 1997

1997 No. 3

What's So Favorable About a Favorable Balance of Trade?

by Melvyn B. Kraussvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Hoover fellow Melvyn Krauss explains why there is nothing inherently good about running a trade surplus or inherently bad about running a trade deficit. A lovely exercise in clear thinking.

Double Your Money Back

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Hoover fellow David R. Henderson explains how to replace Social Security with personal retirement accounts--a step he believes would create vast new wealth for all Americans.

Pyramid Scheme

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Social Security has been "a hoax since day one." By Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell.

How the Fed Slew Inflation

by Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Plenty of economists doubted that it could be done, but the Federal Reserve Board managed to cut inflation from the double-digit rates of the 1970s to the modest single-digit rates of today. Hoover fellow Michael J. Boskin explains how Paul Volcker and Alan Greenspan slew the dragon--and taught consensus opinion a lesson.

Four Facts

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

It takes just four simple facts to make the case for a flat tax. By Hoover fellow David R. Henderson.

When Public Schools Compete With Public Schools

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Smarter students for less money? In public schools? Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro reports the results of a new study showing that competition doesn't hurt public schools but improves them.

Black Studies Revisited

by John H. Bunzel, Anita Susan Grossmanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Some goings-on perhaps best described asodd have been discovered by outside observers in some black studies courses at San Francisco State University. A report on the classroom by Hoover fellow John H. Bunzel and his coauthor Anita Susan Grossman.

Brainwashing the Children

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Grade-schoolers used to be assigned themes such as "What I Did on My Summer Vacation." Now they get themes such as "How God Messed Up." What's happening in our public schools? Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell has a name for it: brainwashing.

Free Market Environmentalism

by Terry Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Hoover fellow Terry l. Anderson knows how to break the gridlock in environmental policy. (A two-word hint: "property rights.")

For Sale By Owner

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Every month dozens of people die while waiting for organ transplants.Why? A classic case of demand outweighing supply. Nobel Prize–winner and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker proposes a solution.

Who Owns Thought?

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

What once took a scribe in a monastery a year to copy can now be copied in a nanosecond--which poses a few problems for copyright law. Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell offers an easy-to-understand primer on a not-so-easy-to-understand subject.

The Costs of Getting Tough

by Joseph D. McNamaravia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

In November 1994, California voters passed Proposition 184, the "three strikes" ballot initiative. The initiative required criminals to receive life sentences for third felony convictions. How has the law been working? According to Hoover fellow and former San Jose chief of police Joseph D. McNamara, not well at all.

What Beijing Wants

by Charles Wolf Jr.via Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Hoover fellow Charles Wolf Jr. explains how Beijing intends to use its growing strength--and how the United States should respond.

It's the Economy, Stupid

by Ramon H. Myersvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Although you wouldn't know it from reading the Western press, says Hoover fellow Ramon H. Myers, dramatic economic reforms in China are still under way--and the future of Asia depends on their success.

Speak Softly and Carry a Big Umbrella

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

When Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman listens to President Clinton on China, what he hears is Neville Chamberlain. Appeasement, anyone?

Where the Press Will Still Be Free

by Edward Neilanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Now that Hong Kong has reverted to the control of mainland China, Hoover media fellow Edward Neilan believes, Western correspondents will begin leaving Hong Kong to base themselves instead in Taiwan. A report from Taipei.

Map of China and Hong Kong

Promises, Promises

by Alvin Rabushkavia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Before taking over Hong Kong on July 1, mainland China promised to permit Hong Kong a wide degree of autonomy.Will China keep its promises? Hoover fellow Alvin Rabushka says no—and argues that it has already begun breaking them.

Ship Ahoy (Shh!)

by Edward Neilanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Hoover media fellow Edward Neilan reports on Japan's quiet naval buildup.

Paid Misbehavior

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Kim Jong Il was young and untried when in 1994 he succeeded his father as dictator of North Korea. Yet using bluffs, threats, and provocations, he has played the Clinton administration like an old pro. An assessment by Hoover fellow Thomas H. Henriksen.

Asia in 2015

by Charles Wolf Jr.via Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

China, Japan, India, Korea, Indonesia: In the next fifteen to twenty years, Hoover fellow Charles Wolf Jr. argues, each is destined to become a great deal richer and much more powerful. The ascent of Asia--and what it means for the United States.

The Big Cats

by Henry S. Rowenvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

After the Second World War, the nations of East Asia were all poor--in economic terms, mere mewing cats. Hoover fellow Henry S. Rowen explains just how they turned into roaring tigers.

Russia and the Islamic States of the Mideast

by Richard F. Staarvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

In its dealings with the Mideast, Russia has dusted off a few of the old Soviet foreign policy tools, including arms shipments and outrageous anti-American propaganda. An analysis by Hoover fellow Richard F. Staar.

What Kind of "Democracy" Is This?

by Alexander Solzhenitsynvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Russia--destitute, dazed, crime-ridden--has even now failed to achieve true democracy. An essay by Nobel Prize–winner and Hoover honorary fellow Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

Aleksandr Lebed the Great

by John B. Dunlopvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Former General Aleksandr Lebed is convinced that the United States wants to take over Europe, that the old USSR must be put back together, and that he himself is a man of destiny, right up there with Peter the Great. Ready for the scary part? By Russian standards, he's sane. A portrait by Hoover fellow John B. Dunlop.

this is an image

The Sun Finally Sets On a British Empire

by Gerald A. Dorfmanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Last spring, despite a robust British economy, the Conservative Party dynasty that had ruled Britain for eighteen years found itself tossed out of office. Hoover fellow Gerald A. Dorfman explains how Mrs. Thatcher's party suffered a crushing defeat--but how Mrs. Thatcher herself still won.

The Present Crisis

by Paul Richvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

The passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement raised Mexican hopes. Now Mexico's own culture of corruption has dashed them. A report by Hoover fellow Paul Rich, who spends half of each year south of the border.

John Shoven

Geezer Boom

by John Shoven, David A. Wise, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Hoover fellow David Wise and Dean of the School of Humanities and Sciences John Shoven recently spent an hour discussing the effects of Social Security on the aging baby boom population. Their conclusions? Without radical reforms, Social Security won't work. And without Social Security, a lot of boomers will go bust. An interview by Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

Campaign Finance: Roll Back the Reforms

by David Brady, Nelson W. Polsby, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Hoover fellow David Brady and Berkeley political scientist Nelson W. Polsby believe we need fewer limits on political contributions, not more. An interview by Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

For The Record

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

No one foresaw the fall of the Soviet Union, right? Wrong. Excerpts from some two decades of Hoover fellow Robert Conquest's own writing amount to an essay in prescience.

Nine Traits That Make Americans American

by Alex Inkelesvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

De Tocqueville and other observers marveled at the traits that made Americans different from other peoples. Hoover fellow Alex Inkeles brings the techniques of modern sociology to bear on nine traits that still set us apart.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.