Thursday, January 1, 1998

1998 No. 1

A Budget Only the Beltway Could Love

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Despite the hurrahs among Republicans and Democrats alike after last summer's budget agreement, Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro sees little cause for celebration. A critique of a big deal.

Illustration by Karen Stolper

If Only the United States Were as Free as Hong Kong

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Hong Kong may be back in the hands of mainland China, but direct government spending in Hong Kong remains less than 15 percent of national income--versus some 40 or 50 percent here in the United States. Hoover fellow and Nobel Prize winner Milton Friedman considers these facts worth pondering.

A Novel Suggestion

by Martin Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Sometime early in the next century the federal government is likely to begin taking in more money than it spends, going into surplus for the first time in decades. What to do with the billions of dollars that will begin piling up? Hoover fellow Martin Anderson has a suggestion.

We're All Fat Cats Now

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

You may not have made the Forbes 400, but there's still a good chance the government thinks you're rich. By Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell.

The Rich—and Poor—Are Getting Richer

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

The gap between rich and poor is neither as large nor as ominous as many would have us believe. By Hoover fellow David R. Henderson.

Two Jeers for Democracy

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

The more democracy the better? According to Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell, not necessarily. An argument for restricting the franchise.

Why You Can't Fire Anybody

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

A commercial pilot flies a jet while legally drunk. He's fired. And? And the courts force the airline to rehire him. Hoover fellow David R. Henderson examines the surreal world of American labor regulations.

At the University of California, the Sky Has Not Fallen

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

The regents of the University of California voted in 1995 to end affirmative action on all nine UC campuses. Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell has looked at the results, and he concludes that the educational climate for minorities has gotten better, not worse.

Percent Foreign-Born, 1990

The Life and Death of American Cities

by Stephen Moorevia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Stephen Moore examines the proposition that immigrants impose burdens on the cities where they live, acting as an economic drag. The facts, he finds, suggest otherwise.

Why Set New Standards if You're Going to Set Them Low?

by Williamson M. Eversvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Attempting to develop new standards for its public schools, California has formed an Academic Standards Commission. One of its members is Hoover fellow Williamson Evers, and he's not altogether happy about the commission's work.

Happiness Is a Warm Planet

by Thomas Gale Moorevia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

At the recent conference in Kyoto, Japan, representatives from dozens of nations tried to figure out what to do about global warming. Apparently, it didn't occur to them that global warming might be good. By Hoover fellow Thomas Gale Moore.

Illustration by Karen Stolper

The Rise of the Enviro-Capitalists

by Terry Anderson, Donald R. Lealvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

If you believe only government can save the environment, prepare to change your mind. Hoover fellow Terry L. Anderson and his coauthor, Donald R. Leal, describe an entirely new kind of environmentalist.

Sunscreen for Planet Earth

by Edward Tellervia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Global warming is too serious to be left to the politicians. Hoover fellow Edward Teller suggests a scientific solution to the problem. (If there is a problem, that is.)

The Rising Cost of Getting Well

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Regulation by the Food and Drug Administration is pushing up the price of medicine and delaying the introduction of new drugs. Think the era of big government is over? Look in your medicine cabinet. By Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller, M.D.

Too Many Cops Think It's a War

by Joseph D. McNamaravia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

When New York City police were accused of torturing a Haitian immigrant recently, the city's police commissioner claimed that the incident was an "aberration." Hoover fellow Joseph D. McNamara doubts it. An essay by the former San Jose chief of police.

Illustration by Karen Stolper

The Productivity Revolution

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Computers have made the entire economy vastly more productive--a fact that government accounting happens to have missed. By Hoover fellow David R. Henderson.

George Shultz

Diplomacy, Wired

by George P. Shultzvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Hoover fellow and former Secretary of State George P. Shultz considers diplomacy in the age of the World Wide Web. His conclusion? Less has changed than you might think.

Toxic Alert in Russia

by Richard F. Staarvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

The United States is about to pour money into Russian toxic weapons labs. The intention? Converting the labs to peacetime purposes. At least that's the American intention. The Russians may have other ideas. By Hoover fellow Richard Staar.

William J. Perry

Weimar Russia

by William J. Perryvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

If Germany's first attempt at democracy, the Weimar Republic, had proved successful, the Second World War would never have taken place. Now Russia has embarked on its own first attempt at democracy. We dare not let it fail. By Hoover fellow and former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry.

How to Square the Asian Circle

by Charles Wolf Jr.via Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

The United States wants a military alliance with Japan and a policy of engagement with China, aims that happen to be in conflict. Hoover fellow Charles Wolf Jr. tells how to pull the policy off.

Why Asia Needs a NATO of Its Own

by Ramon H. Myersvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Despite looming troubles--a divided Korea and a divided China--the United States has only two military treaties in Asia, one with Japan, one with South Korea. Hoover fellows Ramon H. Myers and Robert J. Myers make the case for collective security agreements in the Pacific.

Supply-Side Success As China's tax burden has fallen its GDP has soared

The Great Tax Cut of China

by Alvin Rabushkavia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Care for definitive proof that supply-side policies spur economic growth? Take a look at communist China. By Hoover fellow Alvin Rabushka.

The Present Danger

by Margaret Thatchervia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

The evil empire may have toppled, but new dangers loom. Honorary Hoover fellow Lady Thatcher tells why NATO deserves our continued allegiance.

Illustration by Karen Stolper

Weapons of Mass Destruction:

by Henry S. Rowenvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

How many nations possess nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons--or might soon do so? Hoover fellow and former Assistant Secretary of Defense Henry S. Rowen knows the answer. It isn't particularly reassuring.

We Won. Now What?

by Dennis L. Barkvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

With the Cold War over and done, the Atlantic alliance has given birth to a new world of peace and prosperity. Yet the Europeans suddenly think ill of us, while we hardly think of them at all. Hoover fellow Dennis L. Bark presents a portrait of postpartum blues.

Russia's Ominous Void

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

After more than six decades as a one-party state, Russia today has in effect become . . . a one-party state. Hoover fellow Michael A. McFaul explains why the Yeltsin government lacks an opposition--and why the lack is so dangerous.

What Should Be Done

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Throughout Latin America, free market reforms are in peril. Hoover fellow William Ratliff explains how reformers can nevertheless prevail--and why they must.

Illustration

Why Fragile Economies and Floating Currencies Just Don't Mix

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

The currency crisis in Thailand showed how irresponsible government policy could thwart an economic boom. Hoover fellow and Nobel Prize winner Gary S. Becker argues that developing nations can avoid such economic shocks by abandoning free-floating exchange rates.

WW II recruiting poster calls for the good of the motherland

You Are Strong, You Are Weak, Mother Russia

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

When the Soviet Union collapsed, Poland, the Czech Republic, and Hungary made quick transitions to democracy and free markets. Yet Russia itself failed to do so. Why? Hoover fellow Robert Conquest explains, drawing on eight centuries of Russian history and his own lifetime of study.

Vasili Azhaev's Far from Moscow

The Soviet Lit Biz

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman examines one of the darker corners of Soviet history, describing how the Communists "annexed the written word--fiction, nonfiction, plays, essays, short stories, everything--to the party apparat."

Traditional Asia Meets the Modern West

by Alex Inkelesvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

How economic growth is forcing the placid stream of traditional Asian culture to merge with the turbulent stream of modernity. By Hoover fellow Alex Inkeles.

Thomas Macurdy

Is Welfare to Work Working?

by Thomas E. MaCurdy, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

Two years after Congress passed welfare reform, are we any nearer to seeing the end of welfare as we knew it? Hoover fellow Thomas MaCurdy recently gave Hoover fellow Peter Robinson an early assessment.

Minutes of the Soviet Communist Party Politburo meeting held on March 22, 1990

Fond 89 and the Fall of the Soviet Union

by Gordon M. Hahnvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

The Hoover Institution is engaged in a major effort to salvage archives from the Soviet Union. Archivist Gordon Hahn describes the effort--and discusses a trove of records that dates from the Soviet Union's final months.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 1998

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.