Wednesday, April 1, 1998

1998 No. 2

How Fares the American Worker?

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Conventional wisdom says real income for American workers has stagnated or even fallen. Hoover fellow David R. Henderson says think again.

The Ten Causes of the Reagan Boom

by Martin Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

With the exception of a brief lull at the beginning of the 1990s, the American economy has spent the last fifteen years undergoing dramatic growth. Hoover fellow Martin Anderson knows why.

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Free Trade Helps, Not Hurts, Social Programs

by Melvyn B. Kraussvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Opponents argued that the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, would start a "race to the bottom," forcing the United States to lower its environmental standards to equal those in Mexico and forcing Canada to lower its welfare payments to equal those in the United States. Four years later, Hoover fellow Melvyn Krauss notes that neither race ever got started.

Campaign Finance: A Reform to End All Reforms

by Annelise Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Reformers such as Senators McCain and Feingold want to impose new limits on the amounts of money political campaigns are allowed to raise and spend. Hoover fellow Annelise Anderson agrees that the current system is a mess—but she proposes precisely the opposite solution.

Why One Plus One Equals Billions

by Peter Brimelowvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

The education lobby argues that, if we flood public schools with money, the performance of our students will improve. Will it? Hoover media fellow Peter Brimelow looks at the evidence—and discovers that the educators have their math wrong.

The Covenant Marriage

by Chris Caldwellvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

When people say "I do," how can we ensure that they will? Hoover media fellow Christopher Caldwell examines an effort by the state of Louisiana to shore up the institution of marriage.

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Do You Swear to Love, Honor, and Cherish? Then Sign Here

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

There would be little need for divorce law if we made use of compulsory marriage contracts. A proposal by Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker.

It's Time to End the War on Drugs

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

When President Nixon announced a war on drugs in 1972, Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Milton Friedman attacked the program as immoral and counterproductive. Twenty-five years later, Friedman is more convinced than ever.

Medicare Is Bad for Your Health

by Philip R. Alpervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Hoover fellow Philip R. Alper explains how Medicare's convoluted regulations put the nation's health care system at risk.

If You Smoke, Florida Wants to Tax You

by Daniel P. Kessler, Jeremy Bulowvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

The recent settlement between Florida and the tobacco companies amounts to an excise tax on smokers in all fifty states. Anyone for taxation without representation? By Hoover national fellow Daniel P. Kessler and former Hoover national fellow Jeremy Bulow.

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Send Me Your Skilled, Your Trained, Your Electrical Engineers . . .

by Joseph B. Costello, Lance Director Nagelvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Ever heard of an H-1B visa? You would have if you worked in high tech. Hoover fellow Nicholas Imparato joins Joseph B. Costello and Lance Director Nagel in arguing that the computer industry needs immigrants—lots of them.

The Case against Immigration as We Know It

by Peter Brimelowvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

The 1965 Immigration Act changed who is allowed to come to America. It also changed America. By Hoover media fellow Peter Brimelow.

Who Says the Globe Is Warming?

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell notes that the central assumption on which the entire debate over global warming is based—that the globe is growing warmer as a result of human activity—is utterly unproved.

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Report from Kyoto

by Thomas Gale Moorevia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

When Hoover fellow Thomas Gale Moore flew to Kyoto, Japan, last winter for the United Nations Convention on Climate Change, he took along a healthy dose of skepticism about environmental activists. He also took along his sense of humor.

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Kinder, Gentler Recessions

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

The high-tech revolution is giving us a permanently higher rate of economic growth while muting business downturns. Hoover fellow David R. Henderson on why even the bad economic news isn't as bad as it used to be.

March of the Troglodytes

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Scientific illiterates are attempting to bury biotechnology. By Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller.

Let Microsoft Compete

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

The antitrust division of the Department of Justice consists of a few thousand lawyer s. The market for computer software consists of tens of millions of consumers. Which do you think is better equipped to discipline Microsoft? Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker on why the feds should back off.

NATO's Next Mission

by William J. Perry, Warren Christophervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

NATO achieved its first mission—preventing attack from the communist East. Now it must take up its larger mission—ensuring a stable and secure demo-cratic Europe. By Hoover fellow and former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry and former Secretary of State Warren Christopher.

Who Needs the IMF?

by George P. Shultz, William E. Simon Jr., Walter B. Wristonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

The International Monetary Fund has pledged to help bail out the economies of Southeast Asia—thereby making matters worse. Why the IMF is "ineffective, unnecessary, and obsolete." By Hoover fellow, former U.S. secretary of state, and former U.S. secretary of the treasury George P. Shultz; Hoover overseer and former U.S. secretary of the treasury William E. Simon; and former Citicorp chairman Walter B. Wriston.

What Caused the Crash?

by Charles Wolf Jr.via Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Those who championed the so-called Asian development model thought bureaucrats could make better economic decisions than the marketplace. They were . . . mistaken. Hoover fellow Charles Wolf Jr. explains what went wrong and how to fix it.

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How the Tigers Lost Their Tale

by Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

The tale of Southeast Asia has been one of unremitting economic success—until now. Hoover fellow and former Chairman of the president's Council of Economic Advisers Michael J. Boskin on what went wrong and what it means for the United States.

Japanese Monetary Policy in the Driver's Seat

Reviving Japan

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Milton Friedman gives the Bank of Japan step-by-step instructions for resuscitating the Japanese economy. A monetary kiss of life.

The Problem of Chinese Nationalism

by Ramon H. Myers, Thomas A. Metzgervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Its economy thriving, its military growing, will China embark on an expansionist foreign policy? Hoover fellows Thomas A. Metzger and Ramon H. Myers argue that the Chinese are far too realistic for that—and have been for more than a thousand years.

The China Syndrome

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Despite China's stunning economic transformation, American critics still attack Beijing for denying its people democratic rights. Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell says calm down. Democracy is more a response to prosperity than a cause of it.

The Myth of a Russian Dictatorship

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Western analysts portray the Russian government as a virtual dictatorship. Hoover fellow Michael A. McFaul dissents. It would be an odd dictatorship, he argues, that found itself thwarted by a legislature or pushed around by a free press.

A Tale of Two Generations

by Dennis L. Barkvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Despite almost half a century of peace, prosperity, and democracy—and despite the reunification of Germany itself—older Germans are gloomy about the nation's future. Younger Germans aren't. By Hoover fellow Dennis L. Bark.

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Whose Country Is It?

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

The divide between secular and religious Israelis, Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell reports, is profound—and growing.

Il Papa and El Jefe

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

In one of the more astonishing encounters of the post–Cold War era, the unrepentantly communist Fidel Castro invited the immovably anticommunist John Paul II to Cuba. Did the pope's visit have any effect? Hoover fellow William Ratliff offers an assessment.

Soviet premier Vyacheslav Molotov and Uzbek party leaders

Inside Stalin's Darkroom

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Hoover fellow Robert Conquest reviews a new book, The Commissar Vanishes, that documents Soviet doctoring of photographs, paintings, and even sculpture. How the Communists cropped history.

Terry L. Anderson

Free Market Environmentalism Explained

by Terry Anderson, Candice Jackson Mayhughvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Hoover fellow Terry L. Anderson describes the movement he founded. An interview with Candice Jackson Mayhugh of the Stanford Review.

Kellyanne Fitzpatrick

The X Files

by Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, Kevin Harringtonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

The members of Generation X—Americans born between 1965 and 1978—now account for a quarter of the population. In this interview with Kevin Harrington of the Stanford Review, pollster, pundit, and Hoover media fellow Kellyanne Fitzpatrick tells how Gen-Xers are changing American politics.

Admiral Yamamoto Isoroku

Planning Pearl Harbor

by David C. Evansvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Admiral Yamamoto Isoroku opposed war with the United States, but once the decision was made, he did his duty, laying meticulous plans for the attack on Pearl Harbor. Hoover fellow Mark R. Peattie joins David C. Evans in describing how Yamamoto achieved a brilliant tactical success—only to set in train the events that would lead to Japanese defeat.

Milton Friedman, Soothsayer

by Peter Brimelow, Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Boom? Bust? Inflation? Deflation? Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Milton Friedman peers into the future, making predictions on price levels in the United States, stagnation in Japan, and the new currency in Europe. A freewheeling discussion with Hoover media fellow Peter Brimelow.

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The Unknown Opposition to Soviet Rule

by Gordon M. Hahnvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

New documents prove that, even after Stalin's purges, famines, and show trials, the internal opposition to Soviet rule never ended. By Archivist Gordon M. Hahn.

Evita Calendar

The Man Who Made Evita Famous

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

While his wife sang "Don't Cry for Me, Argentina" (well, at least she sang it in the movie), Juan Perón ran the country, becoming one of the most important figures in the history of Latin America. Where is the best collection of materials on Perón? (Hint: It's not Buenos Aires.) Hoover fellow William Ratliff, the curator of the Americas Collection, provides a tour of one of Hoover's most fascinating holdings.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.