Saturday, August 1, 1998

1998 No. 3

Let ’Er Rip

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Ever since Joseph Schumpeter’s work at the turn of the century, economists have understood that entrepreneurial activity—what Schumpeter called creative destruction—creates economic growth. Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker just wishes a few of the world’s finance ministers understood it too.

Five Things We Know for Sure

by John B. Taylorvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Malthus versus Ricardo, Friedman versus Keynes—for more than 150 years the study of economic growth has been a field of battle. Hoover fellow John B. Taylor argues that the smoke has finally begun to clear.

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Social Security and Abracadabras

by John F. Coganvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

President Clinton stated two years ago that the era of “big government” is over. Unfortunately, no one seems to have told his budget director. Hoover fellow John F. Cogan takes a closer look at the latest budget—and doesn’t like what he sees.

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The Era of Big Government Ain’t Over

by Peter Brimelowvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

These days it’s difficult to find an avowed socialist. But Washington is crawling with neosocialists—in both parties. By Hoover media fellow Peter Brimelow.

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The Second Tocquevillian Age

by Michael Baronevia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Postindustrial America looks a great deal more like Alexis de Tocqueville’s America than the industrial America in which most of us grew up. In many ways, that should be reassuring—and in a few ways alarming. An essay by Hoover media fellow Michael Barone.

The First Casualty of Politics

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Americans distrust politicians—and with good reason. Hoover fellow David R. Henderson explains why principles are often the first casualty of politics.

Why Can’t Congress Get More Done?

by David Brady, Craig Voldenvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

The 103d Congress was controlled by Democrats. It didn’t accomplish much. The 104th Congress was controlled by Republicans. It didn’t accomplish much either. Why? Hoover fellow David W. Brady joins Hoover visiting scholar Craig Volden in explaining that there are some very good answers.

Fast Times at Annandale High

by Chris Caldwellvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

The stated goal of President Clinton’s Advisory Board on Race is to heal racial rifts. In practice, it widens them. By Hoover media fellow Christopher Caldwell.

The Modern State as an Occasion of Sin

by Jennifer Roback Morsevia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

The usual defense of the welfare state? That whatever its economic inefficiencies, it accomplishes a great deal of good. Hoover fellow Jennifer Roback Morse begs to differ. A rigorous essay in economics—and moral theology.

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Brave New Beauty

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Advances in genetic engineering may make it possible for people to alter their genetic structure for purely cosmetic purposes. Should the government intervene? Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller thinks not.

New Age Fanatics and the Upper Muddle Class

by S. Fred Singervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Plenty of evidence suggests that global warming is a hoax. Why does no one care? Hoover fellow S. Fred Singer explains.

The Politics behind Global Warming

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Vice President Al Gore and his allies have been able to present global warming to the American public as an accomplished fact only by ignoring scientific controversy. Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell warns us to “prepare for a new wave of lies, dressed up as science.”

The Science behind Global Warming

by Thomas Gale Moorevia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Hoover fellow Thomas Gale Moore concludes that the evidence for a coming global catastrophe is mostly . . . hot air.

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California, High and Dry

by Terry Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

With California on the verge of a major water shortage, bureaucrats are proposing wildly expensive and inefficient responses. Hoover fellow Terry L. Anderson wonders why they haven’t considered the simplest solution of all—letting the market work.

One World, One Bank

by George P. Shultzvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

In an increasingly integrated global economy, the International Monetary Fund has become desperately obsolete. Hoover fellow and former U.S. secretary of state George P. Shultz makes the case for merging it with the World Bank.

High Tech to the Pentagon: Take a Number and Stand in Line

by William J. Perryvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

For decades many of the nation’s high-tech companies were in thrall to the Pentagon for their livelihood. No more. By Hoover fellow and former U.S. secretary of defense William J. Perry.

The Next Threat

by Peter Schweizervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

The Pentagon recently announced that it will begin inoculating troops against anthrax. Hoover media fellow Peter Schweizer says the decision came just in time.

What Went Wrong?

by William McGurnvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

The countries that have suffered the most in the Asian financial meltdown are those that engaged most heavily in state planning. Hoover media fellow William McGurn explains.

The Hong Kong Experiment

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

A controlled experiment in the field of economics? The last fifty years of history have provided just that. The free economy: Hong Kong. The mixed economy: the United States. The socialist economies: Great Britain and Israel. Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Milton Friedman evaluates the results.

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Asia May Be Shaken, but It’s No House of Cards

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

A swarm of revisionists is busy explaining what the Asian Tigers did wrong. Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker points out what the Tigers did right.

NATO Expansion? It’s Just Welfare for Europe

by Melvyn B. Kraussvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Hoover fellow Melvyn Krauss argues that Americans have every right to be wary of the proposed NATO expansion. Under the NATO collective security arrangement, Americans do the securing, Europeans the collecting. Right back at you, Peter Duignan (see above).

The More NATO, the Better

by Peter J. Duignanvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

The Senate has now approved the Clinton administration’s proposal to expand NATO to include Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic. Arguing that NATO has kept the peace for fifty years, Hoover fellow Peter Duignan votes a resounding aye. Take that, Mel Krauss (see below).

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Why Aid to Israel Hurts . . . Israelis

by Alvin Rabushkavia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

The United States gives Israel roughly $4 billion a year. How is it used? “To bail out or prop up every money-losing socialist institution in the country.” By Hoover fellow Alvin Rabushka.

Between Iraq and a Hard Place

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Saddam Hussein still appears determined to develop chemical weapons. Should Israel consider a preemptive strike? Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman considers the options.

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Building a Democratic Africa

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

In Africa, in any given year, twenty civil wars are being fought. The first step toward peace and stability? Establishing the rule of law. Hoover fellow Larry Diamond explains how.

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The High Cost of Castro

by Peter Brimelowvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

How much have Fidel Castro’s economic policies cost the people of Cuba? Hoover media fellow Peter Brimelow reviews the numbers. It might be time to offer the world’s worst manager a golden handshake to retire to Spain.

Another Country

by Michael Baronevia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Hoover media fellow Michael Barone first visited Argentina a dozen years ago. When he returned recently, he discovered that he was in another country—one that free markets had transformed.

Václav Klaus

A Nation Transformed

by Václav Klausvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

After the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Czech Republic made arguably the most successful transition to democracy and free markets in Eastern Europe. How? By managing “the gap between expectations and reality.” By former prime minister Václav Klaus.

Triple Threat

by William J. Perry, George P. Shultz, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

Hoover fellows William J. Perry and George P. Shultz—the former secretaries of defense and state—recently spent a morning talking with Hoover fellow Peter Robinson. Asked about three security concerns—Russia, China, and terrorism—the former secretaries were reassuring, but only on two out of three.

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Documents from the Terror

by Gordon M. Hahnvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

From 1936 to 1938, Stalin conducted a campaign of terror against his own citizens. Documents now in the possession of the Hoover Institution Archives provide grisly details. By Gordon M. Hahn.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.