Thursday, October 1, 1998

1998 No. 4

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A Social Security Reserve Fund? Don’t Bet Your Retirement on It

by John F. Coganvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Proposals now in Congress call for the creation of a large reserve fund to keep the Social Security system solvent. A reserve fund? Could Congress be trusted not to spend it? Hoover fellow John F. Cogan has his doubts.

Don’t Tinker with Social Security. Reinvent It

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

How to reform Social Security? Simple. Privatize it. By Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro.

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Will Conservatives Ever Get It?

by Terry Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

How conservatives can save environmentalism from the environmentalists. By Hoover fellow Terry L. Anderson.

The Entrepreneur as Moral Hero

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

The profit motive is good—for more reasons than you might think. By Hoover fellow David R. Henderson.

Whither the Tax Revolt?

by Amity Shlaesvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Poll after poll shows that Americans today feel overtaxed, frustrated, and ready for change. So why hasn’t there been a tax revolt? By Hoover media fellow Amity Shlaes.

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Why the GOP Is Doomed

by Chris Caldwellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Captive to its southern base, the Republican Party has become “obsolescent.” A provocative essay by Hoover media fellow Christopher Caldwell.

The Big Enchilada

by Michael Baronevia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Who will govern the Golden State? Hoover media fellow Michael Barone examines the gubernatorial race between Democrat Gray Davis and Republican Dan Lungren—and concludes that on one issue, education, the returns are already in.

Big Government: The Perpetual Motion Machine

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Despite media hoopla about a Republican revolution, little has changed in Washington since the GOP took control of Congress in 1995. Voters tend to blame politicians for the gridlock. Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell blames the system itself.

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Families under Pressure

by Peter Brimelowvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Is the average American worker better off today than thirty years ago? Yes—and no. By Hoover media fellow Peter Brimelow.

Why the Market Can’t Raise Our Children for Us

by Jennifer Roback Morsevia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Neither the government nor the marketplace is any substitute for mothers and fathers. By Hoover fellow Jennifer Roback Morse.

The Battle over the Battle of the Bulge

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

A new fat-free cooking oil called olestra could radically reduce fat consumption in American diets. Why is the government restricting its use? Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller reports.

School Vouchers: The Next Great Leap Forward

by Amity Shlaesvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Milton and Rose D. Friedman have made a career of advocating radical changes in public policy and economic thinking. Hoover media fellow Amity Shlaes recently spoke with the Friedmans about their latest cause.

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How Progressive Education Gets It Wrong

by Williamson M. Eversvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

John Dewey invented progressive education a hundred years ago. It was wrong then and hasn’t gotten better. By Hoover fellow Williamson M. Evers.

Information Technology as a Force Multiplier

by William J. Perryvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Technology helped American forces outpace Saddam Hussein in Desert Storm. But can the Pentagon keep its high-tech edge? By Hoover fellow and former U.S. secretary of defense William J. Perry.

Why Economic Sanctions Don’t Work

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Congress has gotten in the habit of imposing economic sanctions in order to punish foreign governments. It is a habit Congress should break. By Hoover fellow David R. Henderson.

What Happened?

by Jongryn Mo, Chung-in Moonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

In January 1997, the South Korean economy was the envy of much of the world. Twelve months later, it lay in ruins. Hoover fellow Jongryn Mo joins Chung-in Moon in explaining what happened.

Inside the Gulag

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

North Korea — the world’s last Stalinist dictatorship — is home to some of the harshest political prisons and labor camps in the world. Hoover fellow Larry Diamond recently met several people who escaped from the North Korean gulag.

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It’s Time to End Sanctions against North Korea

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

U.S. economic sanctions against North Korea have failed for forty years to bring down the regime. Hoover fellow Thomas H. Henriksen argues that it’s time for another approach.

The Handover Hangover

by Alvin Rabushka, David Newmanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

How has Hong Kong fared during the first fifteen months of Chinese rule? In almost every respect, its people are worse off. By Hoover fellow Alvin Rabushka and David Newman.

A Euroskeptic Speaks Out

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

The euro is coming—and with it more centralized power for the bureaucrats in Brussels. Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker wishes it weren’t so.

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Stop the Bailout

by Alvin Rabushka, Michael S. Bernstamvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Teetering on the verge of collapse, the Russian banking system is threatening to bring the entire Russian economy down with it. Hoover fellows Michael S. Bernstam and Alvin Rabushka argue that Russia’s banks need to be reformed, not bailed out.

The Islamic Threat

by John B. Dunlopvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

The war between Russia and Chechnya has been over for more than a year, but the trouble is far from ended. Hoover fellow John B. Dunlop describes the continuing Islamic threat to Russia’s southern flank.

Russia Needs Reform, Not Higher Taxes

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Mismanagement plunged Russia into the present economic abyss. Hoover fellow Michael McFaul explains what the country must do to climb out.

Rose and Milton Friedman at the Nobel ball, 1976

One Week in Stockholm

by Milton Friedman, Rose D. Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Milton and Rose D. Friedman recall what it was like when Milton received the Nobel Prize in 1976: The Nobel Committee was gracious enough, but the demonstrators in Stockholm were another matter. An excerpt from the Friedmans’ new memoir, Two Lucky People.

Milton and Rose D. Friedman, 1937

Tribute on the Quad

by Milton Friedman, Robert J. Barro, Gary S. Becker, Rose D. Friedman, Walter B. Wristonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Milton and Rose D. Friedman recently published their memoirs, Two Lucky People. Herewith tributes paid to the Friedmans at the dinner the Hoover Institution hosted in their honor on the Stanford Quad.

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Faith and Reason, Together Again

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Who says it’s possible to believe in science and God? Scientists do. Hoover fellow Peter Robinson reports.

Fateful Decision

by Edward Tellervia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Fifty years ago nuclear scientists from Robert Oppenheimer to Enrico Fermi advised President Truman against developing the hydrogen bomb. Only one nuclear scientist disagreed, instead advising the president to go ahead. Hoover fellow Edward Teller looks back on his decision to break ranks.

Culture and Equality

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

What accounts for the enormous disparities in economic, social, and political development among nations and peoples? Not race or genes—but culture. Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell reflects on the findings of his masterwork, the trilogy made up of the volumes Race and Culture, Migrations and Cultures, and Conquests and Cultures.

An Autopsy of the Soviet Economy

by Gordon M. Hahnvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

Soviet documents now in the Hoover Archives reveal seventy years of economic bungling. By Gordon M. Hahn.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Friday, October 30, 1998

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.