Friday, January 1, 1999

1999 No. 1

The Loneliness of the “Black Conservative”

by Shelby Steelevia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Shelby Steele on the price of his convictions.

How Black Leaders Are Leading Black Americans Astray

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Black leaders are less interested in leading black Americans than in “extracting what they can from white people.” An essay by Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell.

The Dance of the Lemons

by Peter Schweizervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Why is the quality of teachers so low? Just try getting rid of a bad one. Hoover media fellow Peter Schweizer explains.

A Little School in the Northeast Kingdom

by Amity Shlaesvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Some worry that school vouchers amount to a risky new experiment. They ought to consider Vermont’s St. Johnsbury Academy. Its voucher program has worked just fine . . . for more than 100 years. By Hoover media fellow Amity Shlaes.

Axing the Family Tree

by Jennifer Roback Morsevia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

The welfare state weakens the family in more ways than you might realize. By Hoover fellow Jennifer Roback Morse.

Quantifying the Brave New World

by Michael S. Malonevia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Plant, equipment, inventory—traditional accounting methods can cope with these. But intellectual capital? That poses a problem. Michael S. Malone explains the need for accounting techniques as new as the information age itself.

How Private Property Saved the Pilgrims

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

When the Pilgrims landed in 1620, they established a system of communal property. Within three years they had scrapped it, instituting private property instead. Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell tells the story.

The Welcome Effects of Latino Immigration

by Michael Baronevia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Since minorities can’t rely on the market to provide jobs and safe neighborhoods, the 1968 Kerner Report suggested, they need something like socialism instead. In the thirty years since, Latino immigrants have proved otherwise. By Hoover media fellow Michael Barone.

Merger Mania?

by Peter Brimelowvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

The recent wave of mergers has stifled competition—or so conventional wisdom would suggest. Hoover media fellow Peter Brimelow argues that the mergers may have fueled economic growth instead.

It’s All in Your Head

by Paul M. Romervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Economists used to believe that economic growth arose from sudden, dramatic breakthroughs—the steam engine in the eighteenth century, the transistor in our own. Yet according to Hoover fellow Paul M. Romer, “this account gets things exactly backward.” The founder of New Growth Theory explains himself.

Why the Antitrust Cops Should Lay Off High Tech

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Federal intervention in the computer industry is unwarranted and counterproductive. How not to mince words, by Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro.

You Call That a Case?

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

How weak is the case against Microsoft? Even a Netscape lobbyist considers it wobbly. Hoover fellow David R. Henderson reports.

Sick Process

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Who would have thought that American bureaucrats could learn about efficiency from . . . European bureaucrats? Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller explains why the Food and Drug Administration should imitate its counterpart in London.

Big Brother Is Listening

by Joseph D. McNamaravia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

The FBI and the Department of Justice are proposing tight controls on the production and sale of encryption software. Hoover fellow Joseph D. McNamara argues that the proposals would allow unprecedented government intrusion into our lives, weaken the economy—and actually increase crime.

Five Ways to Beat the Thugs

by Abraham D. Sofaervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Abraham D. Sofaer on steps we must take to counter the terrorist threat.

Britain’s Final Choice

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

With polls showing that the British public still harbors reservations about membership in the European Union, Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman makes a suggestion. Why doesn’t Britain simply drop out of the European Union, joining the North American Free Trade Agreement instead?

What the European Central Bank Needs to Do

by John B. Taylorvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

As the European Central Bank begins making decisions, Hoover fellow John B. Taylor asserts, “a clear guideline, or policy rule, would go a long way toward . . . increasing economic stability throughout the globe.” Taylor modestly suggests . . . the Taylor Rule.

A Tale of Two Nations

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Not long ago, Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker visited two former Soviet states. Georgia, where free market reforms have been instituted, is doing very well. Uzbekistan is another story.

Why We Must Act

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

With Russia once again on the brink of collapse, the United States must do all it can to prop the country up. Hoover fellow Michael McFaul explains why.

How Russia Blundered into Chechnya

by John B. Dunlopvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

When the Russians invaded the tiny province of Chechnya in 1994, they expected to achieve a swift victory. Instead they found themselves fought to a bloody stalemate. Hoover fellow John B. Dunlop on the way ignorance and arrogance led to a tragic miscalculation.

Why China Will Become a Democracy

by Henry S. Rowenvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

China? A democracy? According to Hoover fellow Henry S. Rowen, the question is not whether, but when.

Two Freedoms

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Beijing is attempting to establish economic freedom while stifling political freedom. Can it have the one without the other? Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman has his doubts.

New Thoughts about Fidel

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Three former secretaries of state, including Hoover fellow George P. Shultz, recently called for a commission to rethink American policy toward Cuba. Hoover fellow William Ratliff greets the idea with three cheers—and a first order of business: lifting the embargo.

The Nineteen Sixties: A Long, Strange Trip

by Chris Caldwellvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

What kind of revolutionaries spend their adult lives seeking to undo the revolution they made as children? Hoover media fellow Christopher Caldwell revisits a decade.

Still the Father of His Country

by Seymour Martin Lipsetvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Although we tend to think of him as a stiff, remote, and inaccessible figure, George Washington is nevertheless “the most important figure in American history.” By Hoover fellow Seymour Martin Lipset.

Richard Nixon, LBJ, and the Invasion of Czechoslovakia

by Richard V. Allenvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Three decades ago, the Soviets invaded Czechoslovakia—and Lyndon Johnson placed a telephone call to Richard Nixon. By Hoover fellow Richard V. Allen.

Peter Berkowitz

Virtues and the Making of Modern Liberalism

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 18, 1999

For students of politics, the study of virtue is not a choice but a necessity imposed by the character of their subject matter.

Mr. Market

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Milton Friedman evaluates Alan Greenspan’s job performance, analyzes the role of the International Monetary Fund in the Asian financial meltdown, and explains how to fix Social Security—all in less than three thousand words.

A Fierce, Freedom-Loving Man

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

A founder of the Communist Party of the United States, Jay Lovestone broke with the Soviets—he opposed Stalin to his face—then broke with Marxism itself. Joining the American labor movement, working closely with the CIA, he fought communism for the rest of his life. Hoover archivist Elena Danielson describes Lovestone and his papers.

Two Eras

by Charles G. Palmvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

The Hoover Archives has recently acquired important new materials that document both the history of communism and the difficult transitions to democracy that took place in Russia, Latin America, and elsewhere once the Cold War was finally over. Hoover deputy director Charles Palm reports.

Treasures from the Archives

by John Raisianvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

The Hoover Institution Archives contains more than fifty million items. Herewith Hoover Institution director John Raisian on one of his favorites.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.