Thursday, April 1, 1999

1999 No. 2

Black History Lesson

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell on a generation of policies that have done black Americans far more harm than good.

Race and Responsibility

by Shelby Steelevia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Thirty-one years after the death of Martin Luther King Jr., Hoover fellow Shelby Steele explains why King’s dream remains unfulfilled.

Book ’Em

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

The biggest improvement in the lives of ordinary Americans during the last couple of decades? According to Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker, the drastic reduction in the rate of crime. The Nobel laureate explains how the United States finally did it.

It Takes a Family

by Jennifer Roback Morsevia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Recent reports claim that raising children in day care centers does them no harm. Hoover fellow Jennifer Roback Morse has a different report to file.

Flatten the Payroll Tax—and Change the World

by Alvin Rabushkavia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Alvin Rabushka offers a tax reform proposal that would save the Social Security system, make the tax system flat and fair, and give taxpayers the opportunity to increase their retirement savings. Not bad for eight hundred words.

The Greedy Hand

by Amity Shlaesvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

The era of big government may be over, but no one seems to have told the IRS. Hoover media fellow Amity Shlaes proposes a tax code overhaul.

Surplus on the Surface, Trouble Underneath

by Peter Brimelowvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Beneath the budget surplus lies a grabby tax collector—and federal spending that is still going up. By Hoover media fellow Peter Brimelow.

They Only Look Dead

by Michael Baronevia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

The media portrayed the election last November as a Republican catastrophe. Yet the GOP did extremely well in races for the seats of real power—governors’ mansions. By Hoover media fellow Michael Barone.

Megamergers—and Megafallacies

by David Bradyvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Is the recent wave of corporate megamergers cause for alarm? On the contrary, argues Hoover fellow David W. Brady. The new corporate giants are incorporating the best management techniques from around the world. Bigger isn’t better. Better is better.

Whose Boom Is It, Anyway?

by Edward Paul Lazearvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

President Clinton and Hoover fellow Edward P. Lazear agree that the president deserves credit for the current economic expansion. They just disagree about which president.

The Best of All Possible Worlds

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Every so often it’s worth pausing to reflect on just how good capitalism has been to us. Hoover fellow David R. Henderson compares average Americans with medieval kings—and concludes that the kings were paupers.

Want High Returns? Take the Risks

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

As the stock market continues its unprecedented boom, Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker suggests that we all recall an economic truism: The greater the returns, the greater the risk.

What We Should Have Learned by Now

by John F. Coganvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Hoover fellow John F. Cogan looks at sixty years of Social Security—and explains how not to save the system.

Social Security Socialism

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Investing Social Security funds in the stock market would be a fine idea, wouldn’t it? President Clinton thinks so. Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Milton Friedman thinks not.

The Biggest Ponzi Scheme on Earth

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

The conventional wisdom regarding Social Security is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of how the system does—and does not—work. Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Milton Friedman explains why it is time to end Social Security as we know it.

Environmental Law 101

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

The best way to protect the environment? Consult common sense—and common law. By legal scholar Richard A. Epstein.

Choke Hold

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

The biotech industry is choking on FDA regulations. Hoover Fellow Henry I. Miller attempts a Heimlich maneuver.

Flying Friendlier Skies

by John E. Robsonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

In an earlier life, Hoover fellow John E. Robson helped to deregulate the American airline industry. The industry has flourished ever since. Yet the industry’s very success has prompted calls for reregulation, to Robson’s considerable chagrin. How deregulation worked—and why reregulation wouldn’t.

Why We're Allowed to Hit Back

by Abraham D. Sofaervia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

The legal basis for attacks on terrorists? In a word, self-defense. By Hoover fellow Abraham D. Sofaer.

It Can Happen Here

by Richard J. Danzigvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

The prospect of a biological or chemical attack is no longer hypothetical. By Secretary of the Navy Richard J. Danzig.

The Politics of Human Rights

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Why do human rights organizations so rarely focus their ire on leftist regimes? By Hoover fellow William Ratliff.

The Myth of Democratic Pacifism

by Thomas Schwartz, Kiron K. Skinnervia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Academics and pundits routinely assert that democracies do not wage wars against other democracies. If only it were so. By Thomas Schwartz and Hoover fellow Kiron Skinner.

Toward a New Foreign Policy

by Ken Jowittvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

The Cold War world was dangerous and hostile but also predictable and tidy. Today’s world is likewise dangerous and hostile—but less predictable and far, far less tidy. Hoover fellow Ken Jowitt offers a new foreign policy for our uncertain times.

A Continent out to Lunch

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Europe’s chronic unemployment is a problem of Europe’s own making. Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker explains.

Thatcherism after Thatcher

by Peter Lilleyvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

A decade has passed since Thatcher and Reagan stepped down. With the Labour Party in power in Britain and a Democrat in the White House, the deputy leader of the British Conservative Party describes what conservatives must do to return to political—and moral—leadership. By the Right Honorable Peter Lilley, MP.

What Might Save Russia Yet

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Can Russia still dig itself out of its economic morass? Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro thinks it can—if it follows his advice.

How Asia Fell

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Had there been no IMF, many argue, the Asian financial crisis would have turned into a global catastrophe. Milton Friedman disagrees. Had there been no IMF, he argues, the Asian financial crisis wouldn’t even have taken place. The Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow explains himself.

Guilty as Charged

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman surveys recently declassified Soviet documents. What Hiss and the Rosenbergs didn’t want you to know.

Sincerely, Mom

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Grandma gets e-mail. By Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

In Celia’s Office

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Robert Conquest on men who fought on opposite sides of the Cold War—George Orwell and Alger Hiss—and on the legacy of their era. “Although the Cold War is over in reality, it is still being waged mentally in certain circles.”

Teller Reflects

by Edward Teller, Lee Munsonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

One of the century’s intellectual giants reflects on America’s past—and future. An interview with Hoover fellow Edward Teller by Lee Munson.

Treasures from the Archives

by Richard Sousavia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Hoover Institution associate director Richard Sousa on a document that looks innocuous—but changed the world.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.