Friday, October 1, 1999

1999 No. 4

Inflated Expectations for the Fed

by Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Michael J. Boskin believes the public asks too much of the Fed, expecting Alan Greenspan to keep the good times rolling on his own. Here Boskin explains why responsibility for sound economic policy still lies overwhelmingly with Congress and the president—and details what they must do to keep our economy growing.

Capitalism and Its Discontents

by Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Socialism and central planning do not work. Capitalism and free markets do. Hoover fellow Michael J. Boskin on the outcome of one of the most important debates of the century.

Why America Is Working

by Michael Baronevia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Visiting America in the 1830s, Alexis de Tocqueville encountered a nation that, although rude and in some ways backward, was nevertheless egalitarian, individualistic, decentralized, religious, property loving—and lightly governed. One hundred and sixty years later, Tocqueville’s rude, backward democracy has become the model for all the world. By Hoover media fellow Michael Barone.

Capitalist Culture

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Capitalism may make us all rich, but what does it do for our cultural life? According to Hoover fellow David R. Henderson, quite a lot.

Give It Back

by Amity Shlaesvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Washington has pronounced the era of big government dead. So why do we still find ourselves saddled with a tax system more worthy of socialist Europe than the land of the free? By Hoover media fellow Amity Shlaes.

What Trust Fund?

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell exposes the accounting sleight-of-hand known as the Social Security trust fund.

Save Some of the Surplus for Medical Research

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Hoover fellow and Nobel laureate Gary S. Becker seldom calls for increased government spending. But he has found a worthy cause: basic medical research.

When Discrimination Makes Sense

by Dinesh D’Souzavia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Police have been known to stop suspects because of their race, and cabdrivers have been known to refuse riders for the same reason. According to Hoover media fellow Dinesh D’Souza, we should outlaw the one but permit the other.

How to Police the Police

by Joseph D. McNamaravia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Do aggressive police tactics reduce crime in our largest cities? Despite what you may have heard, Hoover fellow Joseph D. McNamara argues, they don’t. An urban myth exposed.

The International Monetary Folly

by Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, Hilton L. Rootvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Despite its instability, Russia shows no signs of adopting prudent economic policies. Yet the IMF recently agreed to lend the country another huge sum of money. Hoover fellows Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, James D. Morrow, and Hilton L. Root on a gigantic act of folly.

How to Replace the IMF

by Lawrence J. McQuillanvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

The International Monetary Fund’s cumbersome, bureaucratic decision-making process may have been suited to the financial markets of 1944, the year the IMF was created, but in the financial markets of 1999 the IMF looks like a dinosaur. Hoover fellow Lawrence J. McQuillan offers a proposal to deal with the IMF by making it . . . extinct.

My Luncheon with Bono

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

It’s not every day that a professor of economics gets invited to dine with a rock star. Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro on meeting a superstar who proved pleasant, well meaning—and surprisingly well versed in economics.

The Global Prospect

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

At the dawn of the new millennium, Hoover fellow Larry Diamond reviews the global prospects for democracy.

And Now the Bad News

by Edward D. Mansfieldvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Democracy may be, as Churchill put it, “the worst form of government except all the others that have been tried.” But the process of becoming a democracy is fraught with more danger than is usually acknowledged. By Hoover visiting fellow Edward D. Mansfield.

Stealing Secrets, Then and Now

by Edward Tellervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

In the wake of reports of Chinese nuclear espionage, Hoover fellow Edward Teller draws on his own experience to argue that there is one sure way to protect American technology from foreign spies: develop new technology.

Preventive Defense

by William J. Perry, Ash Cartervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

The post–Cold War era is in many ways proving more dangerous and unpredictable than the era of the Cold War itself. Hoover fellow and former secretary of defense William J. Perry and Ashton B. Carter offer a defense strategy for the scary new world.

Missile Deception

by Bill Gertzvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

U.S. intelligence learned as long ago as 1995 that China was selling nuclear technology to Pakistan—yet Washington did nothing. Hoover media fellow Bill Gertz explains how corporate interests waylaid the national interest.

The Euro and That Sinking Feeling

by Melvyn B. Kraussvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Melvyn Krauss explains why the euro is faring so poorly in its first year—and why its future looks, if anything, worse.

Kosovo Joyride

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Russian foreign policy has become as erratic and unpredictable as the nation’s notoriously capricious leader—witness the Russian army’s ridiculous dash into Kosovo ahead of NATO troops last spring. As long as Boris Yeltsin remains in power, Hoover fellow Michael McFaul argues, Russia will continue to make a diplomatic spectacle of itself.

The Wild, Wild East

by John B. Dunlopvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Any nation that wants a democratic government and a free market economy must have leaders who respect the rule of law. Alas for Russia, Boris Yeltsin doesn’t. By Hoover fellow John B. Dunlop.

Asia Gets Back on Its Feet

by Charles Wolf Jr.via Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Just two years after the economic crisis laid them low, the economies of Asia are back up and dusting themselves off. By Hoover fellow Charles Wolf Jr.

The Next Great Leap

by William McGurnvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

The Western media tell us that China’s leaders haven’t changed much in the past twenty years, and they may well be right. What has changed is the China around them. By Hoover media fellow William McGurn.

The Rough Road to Democracy

by Larry Diamond, Doh Chull Shinvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

South Korea has been rocked during the past two years by both government corruption scandals and the nation’s worst economic crisis in half a century. Can South Korea remain a functioning democracy? Hoover fellow Larry Diamond and Doh Chull Shin offer their assessment.

Flying Down to Rio

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Recently Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro traveled to Brazil to assess the country’s economic policies. He was not impressed.

The Future of Foreign Policy

by Condoleezza Rice, Haim Zaltzmanvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Condoleezza Rice serves as the chief foreign policy adviser to Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush. Recently she sat down with Haim Zaltzman to explain the way she sees the world.

The Cold War over CNN’s Cold War

by Richard Pipes, Robert Conquest, John Lewis Gaddisvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Earlier this year, CNN broadcast a twenty-four-hour television documentary on the Cold War, supplementing the documentary by publishing a companion book. The series created a furor. Critics charged that the series was inaccurate and—to use a phrase from the Cold War itself—soft on communism.

Herewith a debate among three historians. Richard Pipes explains what the television documentary got wrong. Hoover fellow Robert Conquest takes apart the companion book. Then John Lewis Gaddis, who served as an adviser to CNN, explains what CNN got right.

Save This Date

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Reflecting on the tenth anniversary of “the most important historical event of our lifetime,” Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman explains why we should forever commemorate November 9, 1989.

Reagan’s Plan

by Kiron K. Skinnervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Albeit slowly and grudgingly, historians of the Cold War are finally beginning to acknowledge that one of the reasons our side finally triumphed was that we had . . . Ronald Reagan. By Hoover fellow Kiron Skinner.

A Clarion Call for Freedom

by Douglas Brinkleyvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Historian Douglas Brinkley on the speech he considers “the most patriotic delivered by an American president in this century”—the Berlin Wall address delivered in June 1987 by Hoover honorary fellow Ronald Reagan (and composed by Hoover fellow Peter Robinson).

The Day Cornell Died

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

As gun-wielding black students seized control of a campus building in April 1969, Cornell University descended into anarchy. An account thirty years later by Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell, who was teaching at Cornell at the time.

Cracking the Kremlin Files

by Bernard Butchervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

When seventy-four years of communist rule suddenly ended, Hoover Institution deputy director Charles G. Palm saw an opening. Here’s how he brought 25 million pages of once-secret Soviet history to the Hoover Institution Archives. By Bernard Butcher.

On the Cover

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

Hoover archivist Elena S. Danielson describes the origins of the art on the front cover.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.