Saturday, January 1, 2000

2000 No. 1

The Public Revolution Private Money Could Cause

by Terry M. Moevia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

School vouchers offer an unprecedented opportunity to improve educational opportunities for children in our inner cities. So why does the left oppose them? By Hoover fellow Terry M. Moe.

Smaller Class Size No Magic Bullet

by Edward Paul Lazearvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Smaller classes may be touted as the best way to improve our public schools, but what our schools really need is better teachers. By Hoover fellow Edward P. Lazear.

Cheating America’s Schoolchildren

by Pete Wilsonvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Everyone agrees on the need to reform our public schools—everyone, that is, except the teachers’ unions. Hoover fellow and former governor of California Pete Wilson argues that the teachers’ unions are putting their own interests above the interests of our children.

The Case for Vouchers

by Paul E. Petersonvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Critics argue vouchers would make the income and racial disparities in our schools even worse. Paul E. Peterson reports on a pilot program in San Antonio, Texas, that proves them wrong.

We Shall Overcome—by Merit

by Shelby Steelevia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

The trouble with affirmative action is that it assumes that membership in a minority group is a handicap in itself. Hoover fellow Shelby Steele argues that the best way to level the playing field is to insist on the same rules for everyone.

What Revolution?

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Thirty-five years after the presidential candidacy of Barry Goldwater, Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell examines the proposition that America has become more conservative. His findings may surprise you.

How Not to Reform Campaign Finance

by James C. Miller IIIvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

How should we reform the way America finances its political campaigns? Hoover fellow James C. Miller III explains what not to do.

The Quest for Cosmic Justice

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

If we could create the universe from scratch, we’d all make sure that no one ever suffered misfortunes or disadvantages. The problem is that we don’t get to create the universe from scratch. Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell argues that the quest for cosmic justice is ultimately at odds with the administration of true justice.

Social Insecurity

by John Shovenvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Its current surpluses notwithstanding, the Social Security system is still sliding toward insolvency. How can the system be saved? Hoover fellow John B. Shoven offers a plan.

Guess What? Welfare Reform Works

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Four years after the nation’s welfare system was overhauled, we have indeed seen the end of welfare as we knew it. By Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker.

A System Gone Bad

by Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

America’s liability laws are completely irrational—for everyone but trial lawyers. Hoover fellow Daniel Kessler on ways to restore the system to at least a modicum of sanity.

Global Food Fight

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

With concern over genetically altered food already at levels of near hysteria in Europe, the anti-biotechnology lobby is now focusing its campaign of disinformation on the United States. Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller explains why we have nothing to fear from high-tech food.

Are We Hurting or Helping the Disabled?

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker reveals the true beneficiaries of the Americans with Disabilities Act—not the disabled, but America’s trial lawyers. (Why are we not surprised?)

An Electrifying Proposal

by Lawrence J. McQuillanvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Deregulation has made airline travel, telephone service, and natural gas much cheaper for consumers. So why not dismantle another set of monopolies—electric utilities? By Hoover fellow Lawrence J. McQuillan.

Trickle-Down Economics (and We Mean Trickle)

by Terry Anderson, Clay J. Landryvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Thanks to government overregulation, the distribution of water in much of the United States is grossly inefficient. Hoover fellow Terry L. Anderson and Clay J. Landry offer a plan that would lead to more efficient water use, discourage wasteful overconsumption, and lessen the impact of droughts.

The War America Lost

by Joseph D. McNamaravia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

The war on drugs hasn’t just failed to reduce drug use, it has actually made matters worse. Hoover fellow Joseph D. McNamara on why we should call the drug war off.

The Present Threat

by Abraham D. Sofaer, Sidney D. Drell, George D. Wilsonvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

The threat of biological and chemical weapons is already upon us—and in some ways is even more grave than the threat of nuclear weapons. A report by Hoover fellows Sidney D. Drell, Abraham D. Sofaer, and George D. Wilson.

The Lost Decade

by Charles Hillvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

The end of the Cold War presented a rich array of opportunities to make the world freer, safer, and more stable. The Clinton administration has squandered them. Hoover fellow Charles Hill explains what this administration has done wrong—and what the next one must do right.

In the Balkans to Stay

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

We’re doomed to spend the next decade or more policing the Balkans. Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman explains why.

The Flashpoint at the Bottom of the Balkans

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Cyprus has been one of Europe's tinderboxes for years. Could peace finally be at hand? Hoover fellow William Ratliff reports.

Why East Timor Matters

by Charles Hillvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

East Timor has been in foment for decades. Yet last August, when the Timorese voted for independence from Indonesia, the United Nations and the Clinton administration were caught unprepared for the violence that erupted. Why? By Hoover fellow Charles Hill.

Neglecting Latin America

by Timothy Charles Brownvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Latin America matters more and more to our own interests. So why does our government all but ignore it? By Hoover fellow Timothy Charles Brown.

A Death in Berlin

by Dennis L. Barkvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Hoover senior fellow Dennis L. Bark reflects on a gruesome encounter with communist brutality.

How Solidarity Arose

by Zbigniew Brzezinskivia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

A decade after Poles regained their freedom, a prominent Polish American, Zbigniew Brzezinski, explains that they never accepted communism in the first place.

The Last Empire

by Richard Pipesvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Historians may argue over why the Soviet Union collapsed so quickly, but, according to Richard Pipes, the real question is how it survived so long.

The World Turned Right Side Up

by Timothy Garton Ashvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

"All revolutions are failures," George Orwell once wrote. Alas for him, he never lived to see the velvet revolutions of 1989. By Hoover visiting fellow Timothy Garton Ash.

The Man Who Won the Cold War

by Richard V. Allenvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

His critics derided him as naive, but Ronald Reagan set out to win the Cold War all the same—to win it, we repeat, not just manage it. Who looks naive now? By Hoover fellow Richard V. Allen.

Remembering Karl Popper

by Piers Norris Turnervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

A reflection on the life of former Hoover fellow Karl Popper, one of the past century’s greatest thinkers. By Piers Norris Turner.

Where’s the Rest of Him?

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

Just how bad is Edmund Morris’s new biography of Ronald Reagan? Very, very, very—well, you get the idea. Hoover fellow Peter Robinson weighs in.

Ten Years of Freedom

by Cissie Dore Hillvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

A photo essay on life after communism. By Cissie Dore Hill.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2000

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.