Saturday, April 1, 2000

2000 No. 2

How Home Schooling Will Change Public Education

by Paul T. Hillvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

More than 1.2 million students are now being taught at home, more students than are enrolled in the entire New York City public school system. Hoover fellow Paul T. Hill reports on the pros and cons of learning at home—and the effects home schooling will have on public schools.

Why Johnny Can’t Add

by Williamson M. Eversvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

The U.S. Department of Education continues to endorse “fuzzy math”—proof of fuzzy thinking. By Hoover fellow Williamson M. Evers.

The Little Engine That Could

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Bruno V. Manno, Gregg Vanourekvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

Although few in number, charter schools represent a powerful engine for reforming our entire system of public education. By Hoover fellow Chester Finn Jr. and his coauthors Bruno Manno and Gregg Vanourek.

A Dime’s Worth of Difference?

by Gerald A. Dorfmanvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

Despite all the overheated election-year rhetoric, less separates our two main political parties than is often supposed. By Hoover fellow Gerald A. Dorfman.

Why Are Minimum Wages So Popular?

by Thomas E. MaCurdyvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

Think the minimum wage helps the poor? Think again. By Hoover fellow Thomas Macurdy.

The Indispensable Institution

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

Hoover fellow Milton Friedman has long argued that “you cannot have a free society without private property.” A decade after the implosion of communism, the word is finally beginning to spread. By Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell.

How to Put Unemployment Insurance to Work

by Edward Paul Lazearvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

The nation’s unemployment insurance program isn’t working. Here’s how to fix it. By Hoover fellow Edward P. Lazear.

Why Health Care Reform May Be Bad for Your Health

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

Central planning has failed everywhere else—so why do so many want to apply it to our health care system? By legal scholar Richard A. Epstein.

Saving Money by Taking Lives

by Melvyn B. Kraussvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

How socialized medicine is creating a “culture of euthanasia” in the welfare states of Europe. By Hoover fellow Melvyn Krauss.

What Price Pollution? Let the Market Figure It Out

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

Hoover fellow and Nobel laureate Gary S. Becker explains why the Kyoto Protocol, which is intended to reduce worldwide greenhouse emissions, may actually increase pollution.

Neither Snow nor Sleet . . . Can Dampen This Monopoly

by Rick Geddesvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

Once the federal government completes its antitrust case against Microsoft, perhaps it should set its sights on another communications industry monopoly—the United States Postal Service. By Hoover national fellow Rick Geddes.

Crime Goes High Tech

by Abraham D. Sofaervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

The crime stats for cyberspace are up—way up. Hoover fellow Abraham D. Sofaer explains how to battle the recent rash of cybercrime.

Beware the Brave New World

by Charles J. Sykesvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

You’ve got mail—and Big Brother wants to read it. Hoover fellow Charles J. Sykes explains why the government wants to be able to get into your computer.

Covert Operations, Now More Than Ever

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

With its increased reliance on high-tech “smart” bombs, Washington seems to have forgotten a much less costly, more humane, and often more effective form of warfare—the covert operation. By Hoover fellow Thomas H. Henriksen.

The New World Disorder

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

The bloody ethnic conflicts in Kosovo, Chechnya, and East Timor are symbols of the new world disorder, as small-scale civil wars become the new threat to international peace. By Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman.

Blundering toward a Second Cold War?

by Charles Hillvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

The Cold War has been over for nearly a decade, yet tensions between the United States on the one hand and Russia and China on the other remain extremely high. Hoover fellow Charles Hill explains how we can avoid a second Cold War.

Let’s Get Real

by John Lewis Gaddisvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

In its post–Cold War role as the world’s sole superpower, the United States still has much to learn about how to use its power and influence abroad effectively. Hoover fellow John Lewis Gaddis explains why even superpowers need a coherent geopolitical strategy.

How to Pursue the National Interest

by Condoleezza Ricevia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

The United States faces a rare opportunity to promote its values around the world. A foreign policy adviser to presidential candidate George W. Bush, Hoover fellow Condoleezza Rice explains how to grasp the moment.

Are “Asian Values” Really Unique?

by Charles Wolf Jr.via Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

When the Asian economies were booming, certain Asian leaders credited the region’s growth to a unique set of Asian values. When in 1997 the Asian economies crashed, many Western critics attributed the fall to . . . a unique set of Asian values. Who was right? Both were wrong. By Hoover fellow Charles Wolf Jr.

The Specter Haunting Russia

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

Hoover fellow Robert Conquest explains why Russia’s past, present, and future remain dangerously intertwined. “The collapse of communism has left a heritage of ruin.”

Winning the Balkans to Lose Them

by Timothy Garton Ashvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

Hoover visiting fellow Timothy Garton Ash reports from a recent trip to Kosova. He finds that although the West won the war, it risks losing the peace.

Further Reflections on a Ravaged Century

by Karl Zinsmeister, Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

As one of the world’s foremost historians of Soviet communism, Hoover fellow Robert Conquest knows all about the dangers of government centralization. After the publication of his latest book, Reflections on a Ravaged Century, he sat down with Karl Zinsmeister to discuss the dangerous impulse toward centralization, which, Conquest reminds us, is still alive and well.

Still the Exceptional Nation?

by Seymour Martin Lipsetvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

As social democratic parties the world over shift toward the free market, the differences between the United States and other Western democracies are growing increasingly narrow. Does it still make sense to speak of the United States as the exceptional nation? By Hoover fellow Seymour Martin Lipset.

In God We Trust

by Michael Novakvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

The history books tell us that the founders of this country were heavily influenced by the principles of the Enlightenment. True enough. But the history books neglect an influence that proved even more important—religious principles. Michael Novak explains.

Bell illustration by Drue Kataoka.

“I Ring Only For Peace”

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

The main bell in the Hoover carillon bears the inscription uno pro pace sono, “I ring only for peace.” A history of the carillon—which is now being restored—by Hoover Institution archivist Elena S. Danielson.

"The Beautiful Names of God"

On The Cover

by Edward A. Jajkovia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

Edward A. Jajko describes the origins of the art on the front cover.

Remembering Katyn

by Brian Croziervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

In Soviet documents recently obtained by the Hoover Institution, the details of one of the bloodiest crimes of Stalin’s reign of terror have come to light. By Hoover fellow Brian Crozier.

Collecting the Twentieth Century

by Cissie Dore Hillvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

A photographic history of the Hoover Institution Library and Archives. By Cissie Dore Hill.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2000

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.