Sunday, April 1, 2001

2001 No. 2

Failing Grades

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

How race and ethnicity still affect party allegiance. By Hoover media fellow Michael Barone.

How Can We Fix Our Public Schools? By Making Them Private

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

The widening gap between the cognitive elite and unskilled workers is threatening to transform America, in effect dividing the Republic into two nations, one in the first world, the other in the third. How can we prevent such a division? Only by providing good schools for all our children—which in turn means making our public schools private. Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Milton Friedman explains.

School Choice: The Evidence Comes In

by Hanna Skandera, Richard Sousavia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

Critics of school choice have long asserted that it would lead the best and brightest students to desert public schools, confronting such schools with an even worse crisis than the one they already face. Milwaukee has had a voucher program for 10 years. The result? Milwaukee’s test scores are up—way up. By Hoover public affairs fellow Hanna Skandera and Hoover associate director Richard Sousa.

The Private Can Be Public

by John E. Chubbvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

Businesses have always played an important role in public schools, whether publishing textbooks or managing payrolls. Now businesses are offering to manage entire schools on behalf of public school boards, hiring principals and teachers—and taking responsibility for the results. Will the profit motive benefit kids? The answer, according to Hoover fellow John E. Chubb, is yes.

Private Property, Freedom, and the Rule of Law

by Richard Pipesvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

Juxtapose the history of England with that of Russia. What emerges? The importance of private property. By Richard Pipes.

The Dollar Club

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

In countries throughout the world, the dollar has long served as an unofficial currency. Now quite a few of those countries are deciding to make the greenback official. Here’s why. By Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro.

Stalemate in the Drug War

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

Under Plan Colombia, the United States will provide the government of Colombia with nearly $1 billion to use in fighting the drug trade. Yet if the war on drugs has already proven a dismal failure here at home, why should we expect it to succeed anywhere else? Hoover fellow William Ratliff reports from Bogotá.

The Battle for Color-Blind Public Policy

by Robert Zelnickvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

According to Hoover media fellow Robert Zelnick, the government should end racial preferences as a matter of principle. "The ultimate political question," writes Zelnick, "is whether whites and Asians in this democracy have the same constitutional rights as blacks, Hispanics, and other favored groups."

Saving Souls—and Cities

by John J. DiIulio Jr.via Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

How much worse would our inner cities be today were it not for black churches? Much worse. By John J. DiIulio Jr., director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives.

E Pluribus Unum—Sooner or Later

by Michael Baronevia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

How race and ethnicity still affect party allegiance. By Hoover media fellow Michael Barone.

The Greening of U.S. Foreign Policy

by Terry Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

The environmental movement has managed to place its agenda smack in the middle of American foreign policy. This is not good news. By Hoover fellow Terry L. Anderson.

How Not to Protect Wildlife

by Ike C. Suggvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

Under the Endangered Species Act, once a species is listed as endangered, it is more likely to go extinct than to recover. If only the act itself would become extinct. By Ike C. Sugg.

Fueling High-Tech Industries

by Paul M. Romervia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

Hoover fellow Paul M. Romer argues that our universities place far too much emphasis on preparing students for careers in academia and far too little on preparing them for careers in the private sector. He proposes a remedy.

Strategies of Containment, Past and Future

by John Lewis Gaddisvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

Our policy of containment helped win the Cold War. Does the policy have any relevance today? By Hoover fellow John Lewis Gaddis.

Keeping Secrets in the Digital Age

by Bruce Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

To prevent the transfer abroad of sensitive technology, the United States has imposed drastic export controls. They don’t work. Hoover fellow Bruce Berkowitz offers a more sensible approach.

NATO Ten Years from Now

by Peter J. Duignanvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

The Europeans want a bigger share in running NATO—and a smaller U.S. presence on their continent. Hoover fellow Peter Duignan explains why nothing would serve our interests better.

Confronting the Post–Post–Cold War World

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

The geopolitical vacuum of the immediate post–Cold War years is quickly being filled, with the United States now facing a neoimperializing Russia, an ascendant China, an emerging India, a restive European Union, and a rising—and often militant—Islam. By Hoover fellow Thomas H. Henriksen.

The Europeanization of the United States

by Charles Hillvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

Why some bad ideas simply refuse to die. By Hoover fellow Charles Hill.

Moscow, Misreading Bush

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

Vladimir Putin and his inner circle quietly rooted for George W. Bush last November, assuming that a Bush administration would overlook Russia’s human rights record. Now it’s time for the Bush administration to set the Russians straight. By Hoover fellow Michael McFaul.

And Now: The British Election

by Gerald A. Dorfmanvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

This year’s British general election looks as though it will be a replay of the American presidential election—the 1996 election, that is. By Hoover fellow Gerald A. Dorfman.

Incroyable!

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

Incredible but true: tales from Canada’s language wars. By Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman.

Friedman on the Surplus

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

What should the Bush administration do with the surplus? Give it back to the American people, of course. In an interview with Hoover fellow Peter Robinson, Hoover fellow and Nobel laureate Milton Friedman explains why he is "in favor of any tax cut, under any circumstances, in any way, in any form whatsoever."

A Personal Odyssey

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

In this excerpt from his new book, Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell reflects on his early years. A memoir by the man the Washington Post recently called "our most valuable public intellectual."

Mount Reagan

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

One speechwriter’s experience with "the largest and most magnificent American of the second half of the twentieth century." By Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

How Reagan Did It

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

What made Reagan Reagan. By Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

Reagan, in His Own Hand

by Martin Anderson, Annelise Anderson, Kiron K. Skinnervia Hoover Digest
Monday, April 30, 2001

From 1975 to 1979, Ronald Reagan wrote more than 600 radio addresses in his own hand, planning every plank in what would become his presidential platform. Herewith, a sampling of classic Reagan, compiled by Hoover fellows Kiron K. Skinner, Annelise Anderson, and Martin Anderson.