Monday, October 1, 2001

2001 No. 4

Sidebar: This Is an Act of War

by George P. Shultzvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

This is an act of war, remarks by former secretary of state and Hoover fellow George P. Shultz.

The New Terror

by Abraham D. Sofaervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

September 11 changed everything. How should the United States respond? By Hoover fellow Abraham D. Sofaer.

Who Trained the Terrorists?

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

Looking for clues in the aftermath of the deadly attacks. By Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman.

Should We Send in the Marines—or the Cops?

by Bruce Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

In the post–Cold War era the line between national security and law enforcement has become increasingly blurred. Hoover fellow Bruce Berkowitz explains why this is a problem.

Give Choice a Chance

by George P. Shultzvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

Hoover fellow George P. Shultz helped make possible the triumph of freedom abroad. Now he’d like to see it triumph in America’s schools.

Blaming the Messenger

by E. Donald Hirsch Jr.via Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

Critics of the SAT have chosen the wrong target. Instead of attacking a fair and valid achievement test, they should level their ire at our dismal public schools. By Hoover fellow E. D. Hirsch Jr.

The Bush Administration Deals a Blow to Biotechnology—and to Itself

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

Scientists worldwide agree that adding genes to plants doesn’t make them dangerous either to the environment or for human consumption. Would someone please tell that to the EPA? By Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller.

How Gore Bush Won Florida

by Robert Zelnickvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

Hoover fellow Robert Zelnick offers a behind-the scenes look at the political battle of battles: Bush v. Gore.

Big Brother Is Watching

by Charles J. Sykesvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis suggested some 70 years ago that personal privacy—the right to be left alone—is the right we Americans value most. Alas, in the information age that right is constantly being eroded. By Hoover fellow Charles J. Sykes.

How to Defuse the Population Bomb

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

While birthrates continue to fall sharply in rich nations, they continue to rise sharply in poor nations. This growing demographic divide is increasing poverty and suffering. Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker explains what we can do.

In, Out, and Down: Games Nations Play with America

by Charles Hillvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

It’s not easy being the world’s sole superpower. Hoover fellow Charles Hill reflects on the challenges of confronting a contentious post–Cold War world.

On Leadership and Listening

by John Lewis Gaddisvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

On September 11, 2001, the post–Cold War era came to an abrupt and violent end. How should the United States respond to this bleak new world? Hoover fellow John Lewis Gaddis offers some foreign policy advice for the post-post–Cold War world.

A "Yankee Imperialist" Offers Asia a Little Help

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

How Asian nations, still suffering from the economic meltdown of 1997, can revive their economies at last. By Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro.

Who’s Afraid of Kim Jong Il?

via Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

As the Bush administration struggles to find a way of dealing with North Korea and its enigmatic leader, Kim Jong Il, longtime Korea watcher and Hoover fellow Robert J. Myers offers some suggestions of his own.

Russian Federalism: A Contradiction in Terms

by Barry R. Weingast, Rui J. P. De Figueiredo Jr.via Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

The prospects for a stable democracy and a successful economy in Russia? Grim. Rui J. P. De Figueiredo Jr. and Hoover fellow Barry R. Weingast explain.

Pull Russia West

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

Engaging in an unremitting effort to get the Russians to agree to a missile defense, the Bush administration has neglected the most important aspect of our relations with Russia—integrating Russia into the West. By Hoover fellow Michael McFaul.

A Nation under Siege

by William Ratliff, Edgardo Buscagliavia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

Colombia is under siege, with left-wing rebels and right-wing paramilitaries in control of more than half its territory and a government incapable of restoring order. U.S. policy is only making things worse. By Hoover fellows Edgardo Buscaglia and William Ratliff.

Semper Fidel

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

At 75, Fidel Castro has survived 10 American presidents, a 40-year American economic embargo, the collapse of communism, the loss of his principal benefactor, and the utter ruination of his country. Hoover fellow William Ratliff on a man too mean to die.

Why Orwell Matters

by Timothy Garton Ashvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

The world of Nineteen Eighty-Four may have ended in 1989, the year the Berlin Wall came down, but George Orwell’s writing remains as relevant today as ever. Hoover Fellow Timothy Garton Ash explains why.

The Man Who Planned the Victory

by Keith Eilervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

A special full-length online version of Keith E. Eiler's interview with A.C. Wedemeyer.

An Uncommon Soldier

by Keith Eilervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

A reflection on the remarkable career of General Albert Coady Wedemeyer, "one of America’s most distinguished soldiers and patriots." By Hoover fellow Keith E. Eiler.

Voices of Hope: The Story of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty

by Cissie Dore Hillvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

Stabbings, bombings, umbrellas armed with poison pellets—the media called it a Cold War, but in the Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty complex in Munich, the war could get downright hot. By Cissie Dore Hill.

The Man Who Saved Orwell

by David Jacobsvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

Harry Milton served with George Orwell in the Spanish Civil War. His papers recall the trauma of opposing Franco’s forces on the battlefield—and of fleeing Stalin’s forces in revolutionary Barcelona. By David Jacobs.