Sunday, January 1, 2006

2006 No. 1

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Speaking Their Language

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

The U.S. government could go a long way toward building understanding in the Middle East by backing the study of Arabic. By Peter Berkowitz.

Divide et Impera

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Divide et impera—divide and conquer—is an ancient strategy. Thomas H. Henriksen explains how to adapt it to the war on terror, exploiting the ideological and religious differences of our enemies.

Shareholders Don’t Shoot Each Other

by Charles Wolf Jr.via Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Iraq will not be peaceful, prosperous, and democratic until all Iraqis—including Sunnis—believe they have a stake in the new order. Let’s start by giving them ownership shares in Iraq’s oil reserves. By Charles Wolf Jr.

The New Realism

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

We’ve removed Saddam Hussein, established a democratic government in Iraq, and transformed the dynamics of the Middle East. “Muscular idealism is the new American realism.” By Victor Davis Hanson.

Income Mobility: Alive and Well

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Has income mobility in America stalled? No way. It hasn’t even slowed. By David R. Henderson.

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The High Price of Oil—and of Demagoguery

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Big Oil may be an easy target for politicians, but every investigation into high gas prices turns up a single culprit—supply and demand. Go figure. By Thomas Sowell.

Give Me Your Skilled and Capable

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Skilled workers from all over the world want to come to the United States. And when we allow them to become U.S. residents and citizens, they enrich our nation in many ways. So why are we so stingy with visas? By Gary S. Becker.

The Father of Modern School Reform

by Milton Friedman, Nick Gillespievia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Fifty years after he first proposed school vouchers, Milton Friedman is still on the case. An extended interview with Nick Gillespie of Reason magazine.

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No Child Left Behind: The Bad and the Good

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

The report card on the No Child Left Behind Act is in, and the grades are passing—barely. By Chester E. Finn Jr. and Michael J. Petrilli.

Katrina and Vouchers

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

The private market can provide schooling for the children now returning to post-Katrina schools n New Orleans faster—and better—than can the state. By Milton Friedman.

How Educators Hide the Sorry Truth

by Paul E. Petersonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Minority dropout rates are scandalous—and a well-kept secret. Paul E. Peterson on the smoke and mirrors used by the public education cartel to conceal this sad fact.

A Politically Incorrect Guide to Science

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

More taxpayer money will not give us better science. Why is this so hard for the federal government to understand? By Tom Bethell.

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That Rarest of Opportunities

by Edward Paul Lazear, James M. Poterbavia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Opportunities for true tax reform come along rarely, but the time is at hand. A report from two members of the President’s Advisory Panel on Federal Tax Reform, Edward P. Lazear and James M. Poterba.

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What Happened to Arnold?

by Bill Whalenvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Can Arnold Schwarzenegger recover from his special-election train wreck? What the Governator must do to get back on track. By Bill Whalen.

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Revenge of the Rugrats

by Mary Eberstadtvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

“Today’s kids and young adults are openly nostalgic for that mother of all scapegoats, the nuclear family itself.” Mary Eberstadt on the shortcomings of progressive happy-talk about the family.

The Meaning of the French Riots

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

France suffers from a more advanced case of ethnic Balkanization than does the United States, but the disease is evident in this country as well. How to treat it? By returning to the “ideal of a multiracial society under the inclusive aegis of Western culture.” By Victor Davis Hanson.

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Food Stamps: The Never-Ending Story

by Jeffrey M. Jonesvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Amid the poverty of the Great Depression, government programs such as food stamps may have made sense. But today this runaway entitlement is impossible to justify. By Jeffrey M. Jones.

Making Sense of Drug Labeling

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

How the FDA makes medicine labels incomprehensible—and what’s good, and bad, about the newest proposals for reform. By Henry I. Miller.

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Too Busy to Worry about Democracy

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

The Chinese are too busy getting rich to worry about democracy. But when China suffers a recession, watch out. By Niall Ferguson.

A China Policy for This Century

by Scott Taitvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Can the United States and China be partners, rather than antagonists, in the twenty-first century? The road ahead will be treacherous, but the rewards could be enormous. Scott Tait explains.

Grim Relic

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

If Russians ever decide to hold Lenin accountable for his crimes, they could start by dismantling Lenin’s tomb and burying this monster in a lonely field far, far away from Red Square. By Arnold Beichman.

The Gas War

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

The dispute over gas prices between Russia and Ukraine lasted just long enough to offer a disquieting glimpse of the future—Russian extortion of the West. By Michael Mcfaul.

The Legacy of Ariel Sharon

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

From soldier to statesman, by way of most vilified leader in the world. By Peter Berkowitz.

The Continuing Peril of Darfur

by Tod Lindbergvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

The government in Khartoum continues to get away with murder, literally. Will the international community ever act? By Tod Lindberg.

Get Serious, Amigos

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Do the nations of Latin America really want economic development? By William Ratliff.

Hayek in War and Peace

by Kurt R. Leubevia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Austria’s proud intellectual tradition suffered an enormous blow from Nazism and World War II. Kurt T. Leube on the postwar efforts of Friedrich von Hayek to revive that tradition, especially in economics.

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Robert Conquest: An Enduring Testament

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

The president of the United States reflects on the historian who told the truth about the Soviet Union.

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Noam Chomsky, Closet Capitalist

by Peter Schweizervia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Chomsky talks an anti-capitalist game, but what does he practice? Market economics at their most profitable. By Peter Schweizer.

On the Indispensability of Think Tanks

by John Raisianvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Gather intellectuals, add funding for research, and mix thoroughly—good ideas are bound to result. John Raisian on the vital role of the modern think tank.

Keith Eiler

Keith Eiler, Officer and Gentleman

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

The virtues of a quiet hero. By Tom Bethell.

How World Communism Worked—and Failed

via Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Far from liberating the masses, communism introduced oppression on a scale that defies comprehension. The sorry tale of world communism, as seen in the documents of the Hoover Archives. By Robert Service.