Thursday, October 18, 2007

2007 No. 4

Signs of Hope

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, October 18, 2007

Violence is taking its toll on America’s enemies, too—and the final outcome in Iraq, Iran, and Palestine may still be better than anyone now expects. By Victor Davis Hanson.

The Day After

by William J. Perry, Ash Carter, Michael M. Mayvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, October 18, 2007

Why we can, and must, plan for a nuclear attack on the United States. By William J. Perry, Ashton B. Carter, and Michael M. May.

Stalling the Start-Ups

by Clark S. Judgevia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act was bad legislation in even more ways than you might suppose. By Clark S. Judge.

Have Skills, Will Travel

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, October 18, 2007

Rising high-tech wages in India may reverse some high-tech outsourcing. Talent emigrates in all directions. By Gary S. Becker.

Ship and containers labeled with economic terms

The Global Savings Puzzle

by Mohamed A. El-Erian, Michael Spencevia Hoover Digest
Thursday, October 18, 2007

We Americans save very little while borrowing a lot from abroad. Should we worry? Not necessarily. By Mohamed A. El-Erian and Michael Spence.

Number of returns owing AMT

Bracket Creep

by Richard Sousavia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

A tax created to snare the superrich will soon burden tens of millions of ordinary filers. Why the AMT is neither fair nor rational. By Kyoko Oishi and Richard Sousa.

How to Tame the AMT

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

There’s a silver lining to the alternative minimum tax: tweak it the right way, and you can establish a flat tax. By David R. Henderson.

Equalizing the Schools

by Paul E. Petersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

Now that race-based school assignment has run aground in the Supreme Court, here’s a better idea: let parents choose the schools their kids attend. By Paul E. Peterson.

Hungering to Learn

by Diane Ravitchvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

Stop scapegoating teachers. Ask instead why so many students have no drive to succeed. By Diane Ravitch.

All in the Family

by Richard Sousavia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

Why does homeschooling work? In a word, family support. By Richard Sousa.

Managing the Health Care Myth

by Scott W. Atlasvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

If it’s a free market, why does the U.S. health care system keep its patients in the dark about costs? By Scott W. Atlas.

Through a Glass, Darkly

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

Despite the environmental benefits of getting more milk from fewer cows, the very idea of enhancing milk genetically has activists all afroth. By Henry I. Miller.

Tragically Wrong

by Arthur Allenvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

Thousands of parents are convinced that a routine vaccination made their children autistic. Now, many of those parents are taking their claims to court. Unfortunately, emotion, not science, may prevail. By Arthur Allen.

No Gain in Democratic Voter Registration since 1994

Purple Voters in the Golden State

by Morris P. Fiorina, Samuel J. Abramsvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

California’s Republican Party has drifted off the centrist track. But its voters haven’t. By Morris P. Fiorina and Samuel J. Abrams.

Listen to Latinos

by Clint Bolickvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

Should Republicans court Hispanic voters? Only if they want to survive. By Clint Bolick.

Fatal Falsehoods

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

The recent attempt at immigration reform? Thomas Sowell bids it good riddance.

Beyond Closed Borders

by Jeffrey M. Jonesvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

Look at the biggest antipoverty success story of recent years—welfare reform—and you might see the makings of a solution to illegal immigration. By Jeffery M. Jones.

Don't Trust Me

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

How we guard our guardians. By Richard A. Epstein.

Earned Fortunes

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

Bill Gates's efforts to help the poor are praiseworthy, but his real success at worldwide wealth creation is Microsoft itself. By Robert J. Barro.

cartoon map of southern South America

The Far Shore

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

If common sense were to reign over the Falkland Islands, Argentina and Britain might finally come to see their common interests. By William Ratliff.

picture of Angela Merkel and Nicolas Sarkozy

The French Correction

by Melvyn B. Kraussvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

Nicolas Sarkozy needs new models for his country. He need only gaze across the Rhine. Why France should become more like Germany. By Melvyn B. Krauss.

Putin Needed to Hear It

by David Sattervia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

If President Bush told his recent Russian houseguest a few uncomfortable truths, then Bush was only behaving as a friend. By David Satter.

picture of Chinese soldier statues

Mutual Needs

by Alvin Rabushkavia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

How to get along with the 1.2 billion people behind the world's soon-to-be largest economy. By Alvin Rabushka.

Multiculturism as a Failed Cure

by John Cracevia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

One country that tried to heal divisions only made them deeper, as Hoover senior fellow Paul Sniderman discovered. By John Crace.

Words as Weapons

by Peter Schweizer, Wynton Hallvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

Peter Schweizer and Wynton C. Hall tell how they captured history in their new book, a look at oratory that was powerful bot on the podium and in society.

Music for the Post-9/11 World

by John J. Millervia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

John Ondrasik's “Superman” touched a grieving America after September 11. Recently, the unusual pop rock star took a cue from Hoover senior fellow Victor Davis Hanson.

picture of Josef Stalin riding in a car

Watching Stalin Win

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, October 18, 2007

Transcripts of power sturggles in the Politburo, unseen for more than 70 years, are about to be published. Paul R. Gregory on a major historical find.

Hungarians with dead Soviet soldier in 1956 uprising

To the Barricades

via Hoover Digest
Thursday, October 18, 2007

Did Radio Free Europe inflame the Hungarian revolutionaries of 1956? Exploring one of the Cold War's most stubborn myths. By A. Ross Johnson.