Wednesday, October 15, 2008

2008 No. 4

Patrick Moynihan Daniel Patrick

What Neoconservatism Is—and Isn’t

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

Where neoconservatism came from, what it stands for, and how it became associated with the war in Iraq. An intellectual movement considered. By Peter Berkowitz.

What a “Change Candidate” . . . Can’t

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

Our new president will face familiar friends and even more familiar foes. By Victor Davis Hanson.

Evasion and Consequences

by Daniel Pipesvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

A short answer to the long war’s most urgent question: who is the enemy? By Daniel Pipes.

Osama bin Laden and Ayman al-Zawahiri.

Fear as a Tax

by Josef Joffevia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

How an overconcern with security can distort the face America shows the world. By Josef Joffe.

Suppose We Caught Bin Laden . . . Then What?

by Benjamin Wittesvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

Seven years after 9/11, the legal aspects of the war on terrorism remain a mess. The next commander in chief must clean it up quickly. By Benjamin Wittes.

Memo to the Next President

by Jack Goldsmithvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

Soft power in the war on terror needs to be much more effective. How to sharpen one of the most important soft weapons: the law. By Jack Goldsmith.

Rocking the Fed’s Boat

by Dino Falaschetti, Michael J. Orlandovia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

Empowering the Federal Reserve to fix problems in the financial services industry may seem the smart thing to do right now, but watch out. Its hard-earned independence is at stake. By Dino Falaschetti. and Michael J. Orlando.

John Taylor's Rule

Taylor’s Rule

by Prakash Lounganivia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

How Hoover senior fellow John B. Taylor condensed a mass of complicated theory about monetary policy into a single lucid equation. By Prakash Loungani.

Federal tax revenue and marginal tax rates, 1950-2007

Hauser’s Law

by W. Kurt Hauser, David Ransonvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

Soak the rich? You can’t. A vital observation, first noted by former Hoover board chairman W. Kurt Hauser, banished this bit of wishful thinking. By David Ranson.

A Tax Revolt, First and Foremost by Rabushka

“A Tax Revolt, First and Foremost”

by Alvin Rabushkavia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

A comprehensive book by Hoover senior fellow Alvin Rabushka shows how newborn America found its financial footing.

A Nation Still at Risk

by Diane Ravitchvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

Twenty-five years ago, there was a clarion call for better education. The clamor for school testing has drowned it out. By Diane Ravitch.

No Child Gets Ahead

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Michael J. Petrillivia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

Is the No Child Left Behind Act supposed to help everyone, or only the disadvantaged? By Chester E. Finn Jr. and Michael J. Petrilli .

Henry Miller's article on food born illnesses

How Green Is My Salad

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

This year’s “killer tomato” scare should put food-safety remedies like irradiation and genetic modification back on the menu. By Henry I. Miller.

Bill Whalen and the wild primary season

Campaign What-Ifs

by Bill Whalenvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

Some of the roads not taken during this year’s wild primary season. By Bill Whalen.

Selfish, Partisan Hypocrite by James Ceaser

I’m OK—You’re a Selfish, Partisan Hypocrite

by James W. Ceaservia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

A Hoover/ Economist survey of political attitudes finds voters in no mood for postpartisan lovey-dovey. By James W. Ceaser.

Less Disorder in the Court

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

The Supreme Court decided Boumediene correctly—but on the wrong grounds. By Richard A. Epstein.

Supreme Court Justice Kennedy is the swing vote

Power Misdirected

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

Did the Boumediene decision represent a victory for separation of powers? Hardly, despite what the Supreme Court majority claimed. Instead, it was judicial overreach. By Peter Berkowitz.

Who Will Stand Up to the tanks

Who Will Stand Up to the Tanks?

by Janine di Giovannivia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 12, 2008

Hoover senior fellow Larry Diamond looks for places where democracy can still arise, and may yet flourish. By Janine di Giovanni.

Who’s in charge, Vladimir Putin or Dmitry Medvedev? By Paul Gregory

Moscow’s Leading Question

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 15, 2008

Who’s in charge, Vladimir Putin or Dmitry Medvedev? There is no simple answer. By Paul R. Gregory.

China Calling

by Colonel Christopher Starlingvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

China has come to Africa. Can U.S. policy makers find ways to mesh, not clash, with Beijing’s interests? By Christopher C. Starling.

Into Africa

Into Africa

by James J. Hentzvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

A new military command takes a broad, sophisticated view of the U.S. role in a neglected continent. Its job won’t be easy. By James J. Hentz.

The Young and the Restless by William Damon

The Young and the Restless

by William Damonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

How can we guide our young people toward a meaningful life? Research by Hoover senior fellow William Damon suggests a critical answer: by giving them a sense of purpose.

Racial Parity Hits the Wall

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

After many hopeful years, progress in bridging black-white gaps— health, education, achievement—has stalled. By Gary S. Becker.

Caretaker of Chinese History

by Richard Sousa, He Lidanvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

What makes Hoover an essential stop for China scholars? An interview with Richard Sousa, director of the Hoover Archives. By He Lidan.

What the Fastest-Growing Countries Can Teach Us

by Michael Spencevia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

After leading a two-year study of the world’s surging economies, Hoover senior fellow Michael Spence wants to put their example to work.

Adapt or Perish By Peter Robinson.

Adapt or Perish

by Philip Bobbitt, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

To succeed in the war on terror, Philip Bobbitt insists, the West needs an entirely new conceptual framework.

By Peter Robinson.

Explaining 1968

Explaining 1968

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

Was it a revolution? No. More like a baby-boomer coming-out party— with a rough morning after. By Niall Ferguson.

May the Best Ideas Win By J. William DeMarco.

May the Best Ideas Win

by Lieutenant Colonel Joseph William "Bill" DeMarcovia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

Eisenhower took office at a time of wars both cold and hot. One of his first actions was a complete rethinking of foreign policy. Our next president could learn from Ike’s example. By J. William DeMarco.

A Tale of Two Generations

by Timothy Garton Ashvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

Timothy Garton Ash compares the Europeans who came of age in 1968 with those whose barricades fell during the velvet revolutions of 1989.

Cultivated Collaborator by David Jacobs

A Cultivated Collaborator

by David Jacobsvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

The French writer Jacques Benoist-Méchin never quite repented of his enthusiasm for his Nazi masters. A new glimpse at a complex personality. By David Jacobs.